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Forum: Motorcycle Site Feeds
 Topic: Australian MotoGP Results (News) (Race Results)
Australian MotoGP Results (News) (Race Results) [message #6535] Sun, 19 October 2014 23:01
Anonymous
A dramatic Australian MotoGP ended with Yamaha’s Valentino Rossi taking the win over teammate Jorge Lorenzo in second and Bradley Smith (Yamaha) in third. Champion Marc Marquez (Honda) seemed to be cruising out front on his way to his twelfth win of the season (tying Mick Doohan’s all-time record) when he crashed.  Several riders seemed […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Hottest events this week
Hottest events this week [message #6534] Sun, 19 October 2014 20:00
Anonymous

Wonderingggggg what large and interesting motorcycle related events are happening this week? Wonder no more, here’s the CMG list of the week’s hottest (and maybe some not so hot) motorcycle activities. Enjoy.

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 Topic: MotoGP 2014 Phillip Island Results
MotoGP 2014 Phillip Island Results [message #6533] Sun, 19 October 2014 18:54
Anonymous

Simply looking at the final results, the 2014 Tissot Australian Grand Prix appears to have been a clear Yamaha triumph. In fact, it was a demolition derby in which the winners managed to survive, rather than dominate, the proceedings. True, at the end it was an all Yamaha podium, featuring Valentino Rossi on top, followed by Jorge Lorenzo and first-timer Bradley Smith. But with nine riders having crashed out or retired, the phrase “you need to be in it to win it” has never been more true.

The weekend featured the debut of Bridgestone’s latest creation, a asymmetric front tire, one which looked great on paper but proved to be the ruin of several top riders. Designed to withstand the searing temperatures generated on the left side of the tire in high speed lefthanders, it proved ineffective in cool conditions under braking into the rights, causing the shocker of the day – series leader Marc Marquez crashing out of a four-second lead on Lap 18, appearing as though his front tire was made of glass, replicating the almost identical crash Yamaha icon Lorenzo experienced in FP1. Young Pol Espargaro suffered the same fate on Lap 25 while challenging for his first ever premier class podium. From a spectator’s point of view, it appears Bridgestone still has some work to do on this particular model. Plenty of work, in fact.

Phillip Island continues to offer unpredictable racing, with newly-minted 2014 MotoGP World Champion Marc Marquez crashing out on Lap 18.

That the top Honda finisher today was Alvaro Bautista in 6th place demonstrates the scale of the Debacle Down Under for the Minato factory. Repsol #2 Dani Pedrosa got hit in practice by Karel Abraham, then got assaulted again on Lap 6 by crazy Andrea “Maniac Joe” Iannone, who plowed into the rear of Pedrosa’s bike without a prayer of getting through cleanly. Iannone and his Pramac Ducati went flying up and off the track, while Pedrosa managed to stay upright, only to pit on Lap 7 in sheer disgust. The incident will be looked at by Race Direction in Sepang, with a stern slap on the wrist possible for the Italian rider, while Pedrosa’s chances to finish second for the season suffered a serious blow. Iannone appeared to suffer a bump on his knee, which qualifies as “just desserts” in our opinion.

Karel Abraham was one of Phillip Island’s many victims this weekend.

The third bizarre incident took place on Lap 19 and involved LCR Honda defector Stefan Bradl and Forward Yamaha’s Aleix Espargaro, who graduates to the factory Suzuki team next year. Similar to the incident on Lap 6 (and an earlier incident at Indianapolis), Bradl attempted to fit himself into space that didn’t exist, smashing into the rear of Espargaro’s bike. Bradl and bike immediately left the premises, while Espargaro continued on for a few hundred yards before pulling off into the grass and smashing his windscreen in frustration. He was probably irked, in part, by the thought that his little brother would overtake him in their season-long battle for 6th place in the standings. But Smith’s podium and Pol’s own crash means they’re still separated by a single point, only now fighting for 7th, as Smith went through on both of them.

The fourth and final shocker today involved my boy Cal Crutchlow, who had qualified his Ducati GP14 in second place – on a dry track – and had climbed from 9th place on a terrible first lap to third at the end of Lap 22. On the next Lap he blew by Lorenzo into second place and appeared interested in Rossi’s whereabouts, his Desmosedici looking fast, stable and dangerous. On the final lap, with second place firmly in his grasp, and a second podium in three outings his for the taking, he simply lost the front for no visible reason. In doing so, he reminded us of an NFL wide receiver who gets behind the defense, makes the catch, high-steps 30 yards all alone, and spikes the ball on the five yard line. And so it is that Crutchlow, with a higher opinion of his riding ability than almost anyone anywhere, remains stuck at 63 points for the season and, as predicted here last year, sits well behind both of the Tech 3 Yamaha riders, proof that in MotoGP as elsewhere, you gotta be careful what you wish for.

Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo and Bradley Smith shower Lin Jarvis with champagne after Yamaha’s first podium sweep since the 2008 French Grand Prix.

After the race, Rossi was ecstatic, having won in Phillip Island for the first time since 2005. Lorenzo was dejected, complaining that his front tire was destroyed, and that his poor choice prevented him from challenging for the win. Tech 3 pilot Bradley Smith who, from a distance, appears to have no eyebrows, was shocked and elated to discover, only after the checkered flag flew, that he had podiumed, so busy with what was happening around him that he was completely unaware of what had been going on in front. He acknowledged getting pushed around earlier in the race, and was suitably self-effacing during the press conference, attributing his first premier class podium to luck and the work of his team. It is gradually becoming easier to understand why Herve Poncharal chose Smith for his #2 bike back in 2012 rather than Scott Redding, although Redding’s future is exceedingly bright, with the Marc VDS team soon to be in the premier class fold.

Calamity at the Top = Celebration at the Bottom

With the likes of Marquez, Pedrosa, Bradl, et al failing to finish today, it became an all-you-can-eat banquet for the back markers of the premier class. Danilo Petrucci, the heavily-bearded hope of Octo IodaRacing and soon to be Pramac #2, saw his season points total increase by 44%, adding four points to his previous total of nine. For Avintia’s Mike di Meglio it was a 50% increase, the last rider crossing the finish line adding two points to his previous four.

Jack Miller gave the Aussie fans something to cheer about, winning the Moto3 race.

From there, the percentage increases were otherworldly. Alex de Angelis, having taken Colin Edwards’ seat on the Forward Racing team, doubled his point total for the season by finishing ninth, going from 7 points to 14 for the year. Another big winner today, in percentage terms, was Paul Byrd’s hapless Michael Laverty. Seeing his MotoGP career come to an end just as his brother Eugene’s is starting, Laverty experienced a 150% increase in his point total for the season in just one cool, windy afternoon. Coming into Round 16, he had amassed two (2) points in 2014. Today, he earned four. And although this may not sound like much, in truth, well, it really isn’t. Byrd and Laverty have some fierce defenders amongst the readers of this column, but they’re just not terribly good at either the racing or the business of raising money and bamboozling sponsors. Fans of David versus Goliath will applaud every single point these guys earn, but there has to be a better way to make a living than this.

Hector Barbera was the top Open class finisher today, with a career-best fifth-place finish.

The king of the have-nots today, however, was Hectic Hector Barbera, once again propelled by Ducati power for Avintia after a year and a half away from Pramac Racing. Not only was he the top Open class finisher today, but his 11 point, fifth-place finish, on top of the three points he had earned all season before today, represent an almost incalculable increase of 366%.

That, my friends, is some racing. A day of functionality in a season of despair.

The Road to Sepang

The Repsol Honda duo of Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa were the big losers today, Marquez coming back to the pack while Pedrosa dropped from a tie for second for the season to fourth place. We will be traveling to Malaysia this coming week to keep an eye on things at Sepang next weekend, posting a few extra bits between now and then on Facebook (www.facebook.com/MrBruAl) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/mrbrual).

With a third place finish in Australia, Esteve Rabat (53) holds a comfortable 41-point lead in the Moto2 championship over Marc VDS teammate Mika Kallio (36). Rabat can claim the Moto2 championship at Sepang.

Unlike Phillip Island, Sepang is a very Honda-friendly place, and we look for Marc and Dani to get back some of the mojo they left behind in Australia. But Rossi and Lorenzo, each having now won twice this season, both believe they can compete with the Hondas, so it promises to be an exciting “penultimate” round of racing. Watch this space during the coming week for news and views from the self-styled Land of Adventure.

2014 MotoGP Phillip Island Top Ten Results
Pos. Rider Team Time
1 Valentino Rossi Movistar Yamaha -
2 Jorge Lorenzo Movistar Yamaha +10.836
3 Bradley Smith Monster Yamaha Tech3 +12.294
4 Andrea Dovizioso Ducati Corse +14.893
5 Hector Barbera Avintia Racing +30.089
6 Alvaro Bautista GO&FUN Honda Gresini +30.154
7 Scott Redding GO&FUN Honda Gresini +30.158
8 Hiroshi Aoyama Drive M7 Aspar +33.166
9 Alex de Angelis NGM Forward Racing +33.577
10 Nicky Hayden Drive M7 Aspar +34.144
2014 MotoGP Top Ten Standings After 16 Rounds
Pos. Rider Motorcycle Points
1 Marc Marquez Honda 312
2 Valentino Rossi Yamaha 255
3 Jorge Lorenzo Yamaha 247
4 Dani Pedrosa Honda 230
5 Andrea Dovizioso Ducati 166
6 Aleix Espargaro Forward Yamaha * 117
7 Pol Espargaro Yamaha 116
8 Bradley Smith Yamaha 108
9 Andrea Iannone Ducati 102
10 Stefan Bradl Honda 96
* indicates an Open Option entry.

MotoGP 2014 Phillip Island Results appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Church Of MO First Ride: Yamaha BT1100 Bulldog
Church Of MO First Ride: Yamaha BT1100 Bulldog [message #6532] Sun, 19 October 2014 11:40
Anonymous

In this week’s Church feature, we look at the Yamaha BT1100 Bulldog. Not familiar to some of our American readers? That’s because it never came to this side of the Atlantic, possibly a contestant for a future list about bikes we never got in this country. Sharing the same V-Twin engine from the Virago (aka V-Star 1100) we did get here, this naked standard has hints of Buell Lightning and Ducati Monster written all over it. Let’s travel back to 2002 and get Yossef Schvetz’s take on this Euro-only category buster.


First Ride: Yamaha BT1100 Bulldog

Naked urban retro standard cruiser all-purpose love scooter…

02bt110001tSo like many Yamahas before, the BT1100 Bulldog is a tool that resists conventional definition. Yes, it does have Ducati Monster influences, some traces of that sexy MT01 concept bike and maybe a pinch of Buell poise thrown in, yet surprisingly, at the end of the day the result is so original that it earns the privilege of founding a new niche. Original-schmoriginal, the BT1100 is also a fine example of progressive motorcycle design, from its stubby proportions and bold shapes down to the abundance of amazing fine details. Countless approving nods from Milanese motorcyclists showed that at least on the styling front, Yamaha’s designers got it more than right.

Mechanically speaking, it’s a bit of a mixed bag. If that motor looks familiar, that’s because it’s been around for 20 years now, having powered the first ever Japanese V-twins, the Viragos 750 & 920 (and later the 1100 Drag-Star). The air-cooled, two-valve-per-cylinder unit has never won any horsepower contests, so any expectations you should have for easy burnouts on the twist of the throttle would better be shelved. The frame, on the other hand, is one bold and massive piece and holds much promise for rigidity and sporting prowess while enhancing the bike’s looks with its daring mid-tank plunge. Further strengthening that sporty image are those R1 brakes, beefy right-way-up forks and a 170-section rear tire. And then you notice it’s got a nerdy shaft drive and handlebar risers. Confused? So was I.

02bt110004tThings clarify rather quickly upon sitting on the bike and moving on. Any fears of a tough and hard-edged MMI (man-machine-interface) dispel as your butt and feet meet the soft surfaces of the seat and footpegs. Guiding position is true dual-purpose, loads of leg room, high and erect, with the bars feeling at first a tad too close and wrongly angled. A little fumbling with the choke lever under the tank and we have the engine running. There is a deeper rumble coming from the pipes than on the Drag Star, but throttle response already hints at a very mild response. And indeed, after a few stoplights the last hopes that there would be a mean streetfighter hidden in there somewhere, disappear. What a pussycat! Yamaha claims to have raised the peak output of the 1100 mill by three ponies, but with 65 claimed hp, the engine is a real softie. What does make riding the Bulldog a bit more interesting enginewise is that the peak torque point has been shifted from a lowly 2500 rpm in the Drag Star, to some 4500 in the BT1100. So instead of having an engine that pulls from zero revs and runs out of puff by the time the tacho needle crosses the two thirds point; the BT’s engine is much more of a revvier and doesn’t mind hitting the 7000 rpm rev limiter every now and then. In the lower half of the range it’s a nice plodder with the power climbing in linear fashion from 3000 rpm and up.

02bt110003tAlthough disappointing at first, the super friendly power grows on you as you clock more and more urban riding miles. The engine is a real doddle to use, and it’s helped by the cycle side of the equation, which feels really at home in the city. The erect riding position works superbly and allows for easy scanning of the surroundings without any neck breaking contortions needed, an important virtue in the world’s fashion capital, where model types seem to grow on trees. On the countless stone paved streets of Milano, intersected by streetcar rails, the soft fork filters out most of the white noise while the progressive-linked monoshock is a bit less accommodating on bigger bumps. Steering-wise, the wide handlebars produce instant steering response in tight situations and hide well the considerable mass of this well-trained Bulldog. Time to hit the highways and the canyon roads.

With a fully upright riding position and a tiny bikini fairing for wind protection, cruising speed depends mainly on your will to fight the air pressure. The engine is capable of propelling the Bulldog to some 110 mph, but eventually 90 is a far more reasonable proposition. The limited amount of horses in the stable means that quick overtaking requires a downshift or two, but as long as you’re not trying to compete with any squids out there, the BT gets the job done without any perceivable vibration.

Our photo rider surmises if his "lard factor" is worthy of the BT1100.

Our photo rider surmises if his “lard factor” is worthy of the BT1100.

On long freeway stints, the all-too-accommodating saddle becomes more of a pain in the rear. As it often happens these days, it’s another case of a too-sculpted seat that keeps you pinned to just one position. Borrowing a term used by a MO reader, if your “lard factor” is above average, there’s a good chance that things are going to be a bit cramped in the gender-defining zone.

Cramped or not, the Bulldog comes into its own again when the going gets twisty. There, the mixture of great stability and high grip provided by those huge tires, the stiff frame and the ample leverage of the wide bars works really nice, enabling a good rider to maintain an entertaining pace. Just like a good adventure tourer, the Bulldog supplies clean fun in the twisties, but it’s no supermoto.

The 506 pounds Yamaha cites as the bike’s dry weight, and the slightly underdamped fork eventually start to be felt when the pace picks up. Just as well, ground clearance is not one of the BT’s main virtues, although by now it starts to be clear that on the BT1100, if you’re pushing that hard, you are certainly calling the wrong number. In the braking department, the BT1100 doesn’t need any excuses. It’s R1 derived brakes need no introduction and supply ample power and feel in any situation. The rear brake, though, is almost too potent and locks too easily, not the best thing if you are a beginner.

Illegally parked, the Bulldog casts a menacing, yet economical, glare amongst the Italian shoppers.

Illegally parked, the Bulldog casts a menacing, yet economical, glare amongst the Italian shoppers.

Beginner? Who said beginner? Here at MO we are all a bunch of hairy- arsed bikers, aren’t we? Must have been my unconscious playing games. After a few days of riding, the fact that the BT is one docile ride that could be a stepping stone for anybody climbing up the capacity ladder cannot be denied, and that in itself is quite refreshing. Save for Suzuki’s SV650, there hasn’t been a new, true beginner’s mount in quite a long time, certainly not an 1100cc model.

Then we have that design issue. Just like in a cruiser, where performance is secondary to looks (or at least it used to be…), the BT1100 provides a hot conversation topic whenever it is parked in a bike-choked lot. Yamaha is the only Japanese company using the services of an external design office (GK Design) and that reflects on many of its models. The daring and courageous shapes of the Bulldog might have never been born within the confines of corporate design.

Air-cooled twins are back in fashion. This one is twenty-years old.

Air-cooled twins are back in fashion. This one is twenty-years old.

Above all, the Bulldog is one hell of an urban tool. I had a hard time trying to recall a bike that was so much fun to just hop on and go for those little errands–to my lover’s or to get (cigarette!) rolling papers from the corner shop. Weigh in other factors like the low maintenance drive shaft and engine and the BT1100 starts making sense as groovy everyday transportation, beginner rider or not. Last but not least is the price issue. In Europe, the BT is sold in the same price bracket as the H-D Sportster, Triumph Bonneville and Ducati Monster 750. Against that sort of character-laden opposition, the BT1100 is on level battling ground. Will its quirky character appeal to the American riding public? That’s the big question. At the moment Yamaha thinks not.

 
"Ruff!" "Vrroooom"

“Ruff!” “Vrroooom”

BT1100 Tech Spec
Engine
Type: air-cooled 4-stroke V-twin, SOHC
Displacement: 1,063 mm
Bore x Stroke: 95 x 75 mm
Compression ratio: 8.3:1
Maximum power: 65 hp @ 5,500 rpm
Maximum torque: 64 ft-lb @ 4,500 rpm

Seat height: 812 mm
Wheelbase: 1,530 mm

Dry weight, claimed: 506 lb 
Fuel capacity: 5.3 U.S. gallon

Chassis
Front tire: 120/70 ZR17
Front brakes: Dual 298mm discs, four-piston calipers
Front suspension: Telescopic fork
Front travel: 130 mm
Rear Tire: 170/60 ZR17
Rear suspension: single coil-over shock absorber, link type 
Rear travel: 113 mm
Rear brakes: Single 282 mm disc, two-piston caliper

Church Of MO – First Ride: Yamaha BT1100 Bulldog appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Weekend Awesome Bulldog Waves at Other Riders
Weekend Awesome Bulldog Waves at Other Riders [message #6531] Sat, 18 October 2014 20:16
Anonymous

One habit that most motorcyclists pick up is “the wave”: the simple gesture of recognition you give when you encounter another rider approaching. It doesn’t matter if it’s a total stranger, as long as they’re riding on two wheels, you lift your clutch hand and recognize your shared camaraderie.

Or in this rider’s case, you raise your left paw. Sweets the English bulldog knows the code, recognizing another rider’s wave and returning one of her own.

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Weekend Awesome – Bulldog Waves at Other Riders appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Top 10 Things and People at the 2014 Pomona Half-Mile
Top 10 Things and People at the 2014 Pomona Half-Mile [message #6530] Fri, 17 October 2014 22:14
Anonymous

101714-top-10-pomona-f

They’ve been racing motorcycles at the LA County Fairgrounds in Pomona since 1947, but they’d been racing horses even longer; the first county fair, in 1922, included harness racing and even chariot races. With the decision to move the ponies to Los Alamitos this year, it looks as if the 2014 Pomona Half-Mile might be the last one, but for now things are still up in the air. In any event, word got out, and this year’s Grand National Championship season-ender was even more of an event than usual. Relatively anyway. The beauty of flat-track racing is the up-close and personal perspective it allows; this year’s event was a veritable Who’s Who of American motorcycle racing.

Top 10 Things and People at the 2014 Pomona Half-Mile appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha 2015 SMAX Scooter First Look Video
AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha 2015 SMAX Scooter First Look Video [message #6521] Fri, 17 October 2014 16:55
Anonymous

Editor-in-Chief Kevin Duke gives MO readers a quick overview of the 2015  Yamaha SMAX Scooter which was unveiled this week at the AIMExpo in Orlando, FL.

AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha 2015 SMAX Scooter First Look Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Brutish V-Twin Streetfighter Comparo Part 3: 2014 EBR 1190SX vs 2014 KTM 1290 Super Duke R + Video
Brutish V-Twin Streetfighter Comparo Part 3: 2014 EBR 1190SX vs 2014 KTM 1290 Super Duke R + Video [message #6520] Fri, 17 October 2014 16:54
Anonymous

In case you haven’t heard, we here at Motorcycle.com really like the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. I mean, we really like it. Its 1301cc V-Twin is beyond brutish, with a chassis more than capable of supporting that engine both in the canyons and the track. What’s more, its relatively upright ergos are plenty comfy for the daily commute to/from work, school, or a leisurely weekend cruise. So far, it has proved itself as king of the hill in the stacked Super Streetfighter category, as it beat out the BMW S1000R, Ducati Monster 1200S, Kawasaki Z1000 ABS and MV Agusta Brutale in part one of our Streetfighter Shootout. It backed its victory with another win, this time topping the S1000R (again) and nudging the Aprilia Tuono V4R APRC ABS off the top of the Streetfighter hill in part two of our Streetfighter Shootout. The bike’s so good, we named it our 2014 Motorcycle of the year.

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However, since our nominations, yet another contender to the Super Streetfighter throne has emerged. Better still, this one comes from the American heartland. East Troy, Wisconsin, to be exact. The EBR 1190SX embodies everything we love about this class of motorcycle: a big, powerful engine, agile chassis, minimal bodywork and ergos that won’t break your back like a full-fledged sportbike (we’re old, deal with it). At $16,995, the EBR is only four dollars cheaper than the almighty KTM, and even though it’s a first effort from Erik Buell Racing, we felt it to be a worthy challenger to the Super Duke R. So, we pit the two against each other, mano-a-mano.

Erik Buell Racing might be a little late to the Streetfighter party (a category Buell arguably created), but the EBR 1190SX is a worthy competitor to the mighty KTM.

Erik Buell Racing might be a little late to the Streetfighter party (a category Buell arguably created), but the EBR 1190SX is a worthy competitor to the mighty KTM.

If you’re curious about all the specs and details about both bikes, click the links above. For this test, we’ll focus on how each bike performs against each other. Joining yours truly in this contest is our very own John Burns. This mashup of the youngest and, well, shall we say, most mature of the MO staff should give a unique insight about how the two stack up. Ultimately, however, both Burnsie and I came to the same conclusion.

Powerrrrr!

We start in the area that matters most: the engine. The EBR, and its 1190cc, 72-degree V-Twin might have started life as a Rotax mill years ago, but it bears repeating that the engine in the 1190SX is all EBR now. Buell bought the rights to the engine from Rotax, massaged away the Austria, rubbed in some Wisconsin, and came up with a unit that, in our tester, pumped out 156.0 peak horsepower (to the wheel) at 10,700 rpm and 83 lb.-ft. of torque on the MotoGP Werks dyno. You might be surprised to see that the EBR, despite suffering a 111cc displacement deficit, actually makes 3.5 more horsepower than the KTM and its 75-degree, 1301cc V-Twin’s 152.5.

The spec chart jockeys might be quick to claim a victory in the EBR’s favor, considering it technically makes more horsepower despite a smaller engine. However, look at the rest of the graph. The KTM’s displacement advantage properly outguns the EBR in all the areas that count. For instance, the Duke makes 75 lb.-ft. of torque at just over 3000 rpm. The EBR doesn’t get there until 3000 revs later.

The spec chart jockeys might be quick to claim a victory in the EBR’s favor, considering it technically makes more horsepower despite a smaller engine. However, look at the rest of the graph. The KTM’s displacement advantage properly outguns the EBR in all the areas that count. For instance, the Duke makes 75 lb.-ft. of torque at just over 3000 rpm. The EBR doesn’t get there until 3000 revs later.

Look closer and you’ll see the EBR’s power advantage isn’t much of one at all, and only appears at the very top of the rev range. Everywhere below that point and the Super Duke properly trounces the SX, which shouldn’t come as a surprise considering its bigger engine. Where those extra cc’s are really felt is in the thrust department, and this is where the KTM shines. Delivering an absurd 94.1 lb.-ft. of torque at its max, the EBR’s 83.0 lb.-ft. doesn’t even come close. Because of this, “The KTM’s easier to ride because it’s already making over 90 ft-lb of torque at just 6600 rpm,” says Burns. “The EBR’s smaller engine never makes that much (though 83 ft-lb is still a sh**load).”

While the numbers tell an important story, getting them out on the road reveals the KTM’s true advantage: refinement. Where the EBR would occasionally hesitate at slow-speed, on/off throttle movements, like one would typically experience in normal street riding, the Super Duke R was the embodiment of smooth. Every degree of wrist movement is met with an appropriate amount of power application.

The 1190cc V-Twin powering the EBR is an impressive engine considering the company’s infancy. Fuel injection could use some refinement, but EBR is said to have EFI software updates coming in 2015. Note also the adjustable rear brake lever.

The 1190cc V-Twin powering the EBR is an impressive engine considering the company’s infancy. Fuel injection could use some refinement, but EBR is said to have EFI software updates coming in 2015. Note also the adjustable rear brake lever.

In a word, it’s simply beautiful. Isn’t it funny how we’re now comparing bikes with throttle cables (EBR) to the standards set by computerized throttles (KTM)? Seems like not too long ago it was the other way around. JB says, “Around town, the EBR is a little surgey at low rpm, but not a problem above 3000 rpm or so. It’s a big high-performance Twin, you can’t lug a Panigale around town either can you?”

But of course, let’s not forget about the power, because both bikes have it in spades. Get greedy with your right hand on either bike and your head is sure to snap back. The 1190SX roars with an intensely guttural intake snarl as it inhales air, while the the 1290’s booming exhaust note lets the world know it means business. By any measure the EBR accelerates hard, unless it’s being compared to the sheer thrust of the KTM. “Sure [the EBR] is down on torque next to the Super Duke. So is every other bike on the planet,” Burns says. “The EBR still launches you out of corners like few other motorcycles.”

For lack of a better word, the 1301cc LC8 V-Twin in the KTM is simply jaw dropping. Brutal torque and acceleration is met with refined fuel mapping to create an engine that ranks up there amongst the best for the entire MO staff.

For lack of a better word, the 1301cc LC8 V-Twin in the KTM is simply jaw dropping. Brutal torque and acceleration is met with refined fuel mapping to create an engine that ranks up there amongst the best for the entire MO staff.

Both bikes come equipped with slipper clutches, and they work well when coming hot into a corner. Rowing through the six cogs is generally slick on both, but the EBR feels a bit notchy in the first two gears. Both bikes also feature traction control, the 1190 with 21 different settings (including off), though we never needed it thanks to the fresh Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa tires, the same ones fitted to the Duke. The KTM’s TC, meanwhile, only has three settings (four including off), which are tied into the Duke’s three power modes (Sport, Street, Rain). We kept it in Sport (read: fun mode) and because the rear Pirelli on our bike was shagged from a previous trip to Chuckwalla, Burns noticed more than a few occasions where the computers saved his bacon when he got greedy with the throttle: “Just mash the gas and let the tire and the pavement negotiate through the computer. What could go wrong?”

Backroad Bombers

If the KTM wins the engine battle, the EBR fights back in the handling department. With a 22.4-degree rake, 3.8 inches of trail and 55.5-inch wheelbase, when you compare it to the KTM’s 24.9-degree rake, 4.2-inch trail and 58.3-inch wheelbase, the Austrian machine almost feels truckish in comparison. The KTM also tipped our scales at 468.2 lbs. with a full tank of gas, almost 20 lbs. more than the EBR (448.6 lbs.). Combine these factors, and it’s no surprise the 1190SX flicks from side to side with the greatest of ease. “With stiffer suspension, shorter trail and less weight, you can really dive into corners deeper on the Buell, and the stiffer springs give it a shade more front-end feel also,” says Burns.

The EBR comes alive when the roads start to bend. It’s here where a competent EBR rider can make time on a less-skilled KTM rider, as the 1190’s chassis is supremely agile.

The EBR comes alive when the roads start to bend. It’s here where a competent EBR rider can make time on a less-skilled KTM rider, as the 1190’s chassis is supremely agile.

Sure the Duke might appear a tad lazier than the EBR in the twisty stuff, but judged by any other measure the KTM is anything but. Wide bars give it good leverage to toss into turns, and when all else fails, add in the massive torque advantage it has and it can afford to give up a little on corner entrance. Says JB, on corner exit, “the Duke uses its torque to re-open the gap at the exits; it’s really like Jorge Lorenzo style vs. Nick Hayden transported to the street, high cornering speed vs. slow in and fast out. On the street, of course, the latter is probably more conducive to a long and happy life.”

Another Buell trait is his innovative thinking. The 1190SX continues the trademark fuel-in-frame technology along with the massive 386mm perimeter front brake and 8-piston caliper. A steel-braided brake line helps provide a positive feel at the adjustable lever, and while braking power and feel is no doubt strong and impressive, the M50 calipers and 320mm discs adorning the KTM are simply astounding, combining more power than the EBR’s brake with superior feel. It’s almost unfair, really, but it gives the Super Duke R a clear advantage in the stopping category.

While the EBR might have an advantage over the KTM in the twisty bits, the Super Duke certainly doesn’t trail very far behind. And if it does, simply twist your wrist and that gap disappears.

While the EBR might have an advantage over the KTM in the twisty bits, the Super Duke certainly doesn’t trail very far behind. And if it does, simply twist your wrist and that gap disappears.

Street Manners

Both the 1190SX and 1290 Super Duke R are more than capable of tearing apart your local canyon road. However, both models are street bikes first and foremost, and therefore need to be judged on their all-around usefulness.

From an ergonomic standpoint, the SX is literally the 1190RX fully faired sportbike sans bodywork and with the addition of a handlebar. Yes, the bar puts less of a lean on the upper body, but footpegs remain untouched, which means your feet are noticeably higher and further rearset than on the KTM. A 32.5-inch seat height is only marginally shorter than the KTM’s (32.9 inches), so that’s basically a wash, but the overall package is considerably more compact, as if your head is directly over the front tire.

The 1190SX only makes minor concessions to its fully-faired 1190RX superbike sibling, in the way of raised handlebars. That said, between the two, we’ll take the SX if we’re doing mostly street riding.

The 1190SX only makes minor concessions to its fully-faired 1190RX superbike sibling, in the way of raised handlebars. That said, between the two, we’ll take the SX if we’re doing mostly street riding.

Live with the EBR, and you notice the heat emanating from the side-mounted radiators. While the minimal cowling does its best to move the hot air the puller fans are blowing away from the rider, in reality it ends up blasting the rider’s legs. It’s actually pleasing on cooler days, but on hot ones it’s downright brutal.

Then there’s the noise. The EBR makes a mixture of pleasing and, well, not so pleasing sounds. Those aforementioned fans are in the latter category. They’re loud, and unless the bike is completely keyed off, they’re blowing seemingly all the time. However, they’re offset by the unique high-pitch squeal of the chain idler on decel, or as Burns calls it, the “little Stuka dive-bomber whine.” It’s cool, unique and different. We like it.

While it doesn’t look it at first glance, with some appropriate luggage, the 1290 Super Duke R could be a viable sport touring rig. Emphasis on sport.

While it doesn’t look it at first glance, with some appropriate luggage, the 1290 Super Duke R could be a viable sport touring rig. Emphasis on sport.

Steering sweep is shallow on the 1190SX, but really isn’t noticed much unless you make numerous U-turns like we do for photo shoots. Otherwise, it gets mileage in the mid to high 30s in normal use. Not great, but acceptable. Meanwhile, the KTM returned 40 mpg.

The KTM’s ergos? I’ll let John explain. “The Super Duke feels like settling back into Tom Roderick’s easy chair after you’ve been working at your stand-up desk for a few hours. Ahhhh …” The pegs are low and forward, seating position is comfortable, and yet it’s still ready to tear up any path in front of it.

If you have roads like this in your backyard, few bikes out there will be able to carve them like the EBR.

If you have roads like this in your backyard, few bikes out there will be able to carve them like the EBR.

John continues, “I like all the EBR’s mechanical noises and goings-on; it feels more like a race bike where not much effort has been diverted to creature comforts or aesthetics, probably because it hasn’t been. The Duke in comparison actually feels a bit sanitized. You can look at the EBR’s `rawness’ as a demerit, but I kind of like that part of its personality. If I had to ride one three hours to Chuckwalla, I’d rather ride the KTM (and I did once, it wasn’t bad), but if the drone to get to the fun is an hour or less, the EBR is not so bad. It does buzz more through the handlebars at 5000 rpm and 80 mph. The KTM has a better seat and better suspension for casual, sport-touring use.”

Still King of the Hill

We knew it would take a mighty effort to push the KTM off the top of the hill, and this test simply reiterated how impressive the Super Duke R is, as it won all but two of the categories on our MO scorecard. However, for a first effort the EBR is no joke. It handles with the best of them, and a capable rider will thoroughly enjoy getting the most out of that chassis.

If there’s only room for one motorcycle in your garage, then the answer is simple: KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

If there’s only room for one motorcycle in your garage, then the answer is simple: KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

Though the KTM is our favorite, in the end, it comes down to what’s already in your garage. Here’s JB: “It sort of comes back to, is this going to be an only bike or one of a few? If you’re only having one, it would have to be the KTM because of its ride-by-wire refinement, greater comfort (heated grips!), ease of use and in general broader performance envelope. But if you already have a general-purpose bike to ride most of the time, and wanted something a little more bombastic and unique to ‘act out’ upon now and then, maybe do a track day or two, this EBR is a great and deserving descendant of the outrageous, thumb-in-the-eyeball-of-authority Erik Buell legacy. Two middle fingers up.”

Brutish V-Twin Streetfighter Comparo

Category EBR1190SX KTM 1290
Super Duke R
MSRP 100% 100%
Weight 100% 95.8%
lb/hp 100% 93.6%
lb/lb-ft 92.6% 100%
Engine 95.0% 97.5%
Transmission/Clutch 87.5% 93.8%
Handling 97.5% 96.3%
Brakes 90.0% 96.3%
Suspension 91.3% 96.3%
Technologies 87.5% 96.3%
Instruments 90.0% 90.0%
Ergonomics/Comfort 87.5% 95.0%
Quality, Fit & Finish 82.5% 92.5%
Cool Factor 93.8% 92.5%
Grin Factor 92.5% 95.0%
Overall Score 92.4% 95.4%

 

EBR 1190SX KTM 1290 Super Duke R
MSRP $16,995.00 $16,999.00
Engine Capacity 1190cc 1301cc
Engine Type Liquid-cooled 8-valve, 72º V-Twin, Liquid-cooled, 8 valve, 75º V-Twin
Bore x Stroke 106mm x 67.5mm 108mm x 71mm
Compression Ratio 13.4:1 13.2:1
Horsepower 156.0 @ 10,700 rpm 152.5 @ 9000 rpm
Torque 83.0 lb.-ft @ 8100 rpm 94.1 lb.-ft @ 8200 rpm
Fuel System Electronic fuel injection Electronic fuel injection
Transmission 6-speed 6-speed
Final Drive Chain Chain
Front Suspension Fully-adjustable Showa inverted Big Piston Fork WP Suspension 48mm inverted fork with adjustable compression and rebound damping
Rear Suspension Fully-adjustable Showa monoshock WP Suspension monoshock, fully adjustable
Front Brakes Single 386mm perimeter rotor, 8-piston inside-out caliper Dual 320mm rotors with Brembo M50 monoblock 4-piston calipers and ABS
Rear Brakes Single 220mm rotor with 2-piston caliper Single 240mm rear rotor with 2-piston caliper, ABS
Front Tire 120/70-17 120/70-17
Rear Tire 190/55-17 190/55-17
Seat Height 32.5 in. 32.9 in.
Wheelbase 55.5 in. 58.3 in.
Rake/Trail 22.4 º/3.8 in 24.9º/4.21 in
Curb Weight 448.6 lbs 468.2 lbs
Fuel Capacity 4.5 gals. 4.7 gals.

Brutish V-Twin Streetfighter Comparo Part 3: 2014 EBR 1190SX vs 2014 KTM 1290 Super Duke R + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Suzuki Recalls 23,073 GSX-R1000 and GSX-R750 Sportbikes
Suzuki Recalls 23,073 GSX-R1000 and GSX-R750 Sportbikes [message #6519] Fri, 17 October 2014 16:25
Anonymous

Suzuki is recalling 23,073 GSX-R models in the U.S. because of a problem with the drive chain adjuster. The recall affects GSX-R750 models from 2011-2014 and GSX-R1000 models from 2009-2014.

According to documents released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the drive chain adjuster on affected models may become damaged if the rider misses a gear while upshifting. Trying to correct the problem but upshifting again without disengaging the clutch may place a lot of tension on the drive chain, pulling the rear axle shaft forward and damaging the chain adjuster.

A damaged adjuster may cause the chain out of proper adjustment and potentially cause it to come off, cutting power delivery to the rear wheel and increasing the risk of a crash.

101714-2014-suzuki-gsx-r1000se-chain-adjuster

Suzuki first received three field reports from American consumers claiming loose drive chains in May 2012. The company collected the affected components and conducted an investigation but was unable to find the source of the problem. In October 2012, Suzuki received a fourth report, this time involving a drive chain that broke under operation. By the end of 2013, Suzuki had received 14 similar reports from the U.S.

This past winter, Suzuki was able to reproduce the problem, but only by jumping and landing a test bike with the rear wheel spinning. This was considered an abnormal usage and would not have likely resulted in a recall. From April to June however, Suzuki received 10 more reports and then realized the strain from trying to recover from a false neutral may also cause the problem. By September, Suzuki had received 31 field reports before deciding to initiate a recall campaign.

Suzuki dealers will replace the left-side chain adjusters on affected motorcycles with a new part that has been strengthened by heat-treatment to withstand the extra tension from recovering from missed gears.

[Source: NHTSA]

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 Topic: Gabe Gets Up Close and Personal With Ducati’s New Scrambler (Bike Reports) (News)
Gabe Gets Up Close and Personal With Ducati’s New Scrambler (Bike Reports) (News) [message #6529] Fri, 17 October 2014 14:47
Anonymous
Gabe had a chance to check out the new Ducati Scrambler in Florida yesterday, and he posted this video. Note a couple of things, including (1) MD does not consider this bike strictly “entry level” (chalk that up to Gabe’s jet lag) with 75 hp in an under-400 pound package, and (2) we apologize for […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Schuberth M1 Helmet Introduced At AIMExpo
Schuberth M1 Helmet Introduced At AIMExpo [message #6518] Fri, 17 October 2014 14:42
Anonymous

German helmet manufacturer, Schuberth, unveiled the M1 open face helmet at the AIMExpo yesterday.

Schuberth_M1The M1 is available in colors and is customizable via numerous faceshields and sun visor colors. The face shield is easily removable, and the graphite toned lining is available in an interchangeable coffee color, and the top vent cover can be changed from titanium color to matte black.

One of the more impressive features of the new M1 is the Snap-n-Play Schuberth Rider Communication System accessory. The M1 features built-in speakers, boomless microphone and antenna, and the SRC-System that snaps into place on the back of the helmet. Powered by Cardo, this optional upgrade pairs wirelessly with most Bluetooth devices to facilitate bike-to-bike communication, phone calls, GPS or music.

The Schuberth M1 will be available in North America in spring 2015 through Schuberth North America dealers or online at www.SchuberthNorthAmerica.com.

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 Topic: Bonhams Las Vegas to Auction Herb Harris Bike Collection
Bonhams Las Vegas to Auction Herb Harris Bike Collection [message #6517] Fri, 17 October 2014 14:33
Anonymous

On Thursday, January 8, 2015, world famous auction house Bonhams has announced that, in addition to motorcycles from the estates of Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda, the Las Vegas event will also feature the renowned Herb Harris Collection. Readers may remember Harris as the collector who located and then, in a painstaking effort towards maintaining historical accuracy, restored the Rollie Free Bathing Suit Bike. Because of his reputation for meticulous restoration, Harris bikes command higher value than many other collector motorcycles.

While this auction will include “a selection of important prototype, racing and road models,” it will also feature “a dozen cut-away engines and associated memorabilia,” presenting collectors world-wide with an opportunity to purchase some extremely rare and unique motorcycles and other artifacts.

Motorcycles to be auctioned include: a 1946 Vincent “1X” Rapide B Prototype (the first one ever created and whose engine had been “lost” until Harris tracked it down, reuniting it with its chassis), a 1949 Vincent Rapide C with matching Blacknell Bullet Sidecar, a 1957 BSA B34 Works Racer, a 1962 Matchless G50 CSR Silver Eagle (including a spare engine), and an early 1949 AJS 7R.

The factory-produced cutaway engines were originally used for educational purposes and come from historic marques, such as Ariel, BSA, Matchless, New Imperial, Norton, Sunbeam and Triumph. If sectioned engines aren’t enough, two complete sectioned motorcycles will also be offered by Bonhams Las Vegas. The BSA Lightning may be unique, but the sectioned BSA Goldstar Clubman, which was fabricated for the Earls Court Motor Show, remains fully operational – allowing viewers the opportunity to see components from the engine to the suspension is action.

Finally, Harris, in his role as motorcycle historian, collected many one-of-a-kind documents, such as the first conceptual drawings Phil Vincent made in 1928 and the “original bill of sale of the HRD company to Phil Vincent in 1928.”

To learn more about the Bonhams Las Vegas Motorcycle Auction or see photos of the rare items, visit the Bonhams website.

 

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 Topic: Yamaha Announces New SMAX Scooter (Bike Reports) (News)
Yamaha Announces New SMAX Scooter (Bike Reports) (News) [message #6528] Fri, 17 October 2014 14:28
Anonymous
Look out Suzuki—Yamaha’s gunning for your top performance model. No, I’m not talking about the GSX-R. Yamaha is entering the middleweight sport scooter (I just invented that) segment with the 2015 SMAX (say “Ess-Max,” not “smacks”) Sport Scooter. It spots Suzuki’s Burgman 200 45cc, but it should have the power and speed to give the ‘zook […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Troy Bayliss Accepts Invitation For 2014 Superprestigio Dirt Track Race
Troy Bayliss Accepts Invitation For 2014 Superprestigio Dirt Track Race [message #6516] Fri, 17 October 2014 14:18
Anonymous

MotoGP race winner and three-time World Superbike champion, Troy Bayliss, has accepted an invitation to race in Barcelona’s invitational Superprestigio Dirt Track race on December 13. Bayliss, Superbike world champion in 2001, 2006 and 2008, has made this announcement after meeting 2014 MotoGP world champion, Marc Marquez the week of the Australian MotoGP Grand Prix at Philip Island. Both riders and more than 20 current FIM World Championship roadracers will meet and face each other on the clay 200-meter oval racetrack in Barcelona, Spain.

These days, Bayliss is competing in Australian Flat Track and Supermoto championships, where he’s won a total of five championships between the two. In fact, the Superprestigio will come only two weeks after the Motul Baylisstic Scramble Teams Challenge in Melbourne, providing good practice for the event in Spain.

Troy Bayliss: “I am excited to confirm that I will be taking part in the second running of the Superprestigio in Barcelona. It is perfect timing for me, just two weeks after a race in Melbourne, so I will have a good lead-up event to help me prepare. The Superprestigio has grown a lot with so many top riders, and hope it will also help raise awareness of Dirt Track here in Australia.”

Marc Marquez: “This is really great news! I’m thrilled, because Barcelona is not close to Troy’s hometown. Hopefully he can come a few days early and practice with me on my track. Races will be amazing, we’ll have real great time there!”

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 Topic: Yamaha Introduces 2015 Yamaha YZ250FX and WR250F (Bike Reports) (News)
Yamaha Introduces 2015 Yamaha YZ250FX and WR250F (Bike Reports) (News) [message #6527] Fri, 17 October 2014 14:00
Anonymous
  Yamaha showed two new off-road models to the assembled press and dealers at the Orlando AIMExpo, the WR250F and the YZ250FX. The bikes are intended to give Yamaha customers competitive racing or leisure riding machines. The WR250F has always been a popular model—Yamaha claims its a sales leader in that segment—but the 2015 is […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Motorcycle Parts Retailer Jake Wilson Awarded Bizrate Platinum Circle Of Excellence
Motorcycle Parts Retailer Jake Wilson Awarded Bizrate Platinum Circle Of Excellence [message #6515] Fri, 17 October 2014 13:36
Anonymous

From a Jake Wilson press release:


Jake Wilson, the online motorcycle parts and accessories retailer, has been awarded the Bizrate Platinum Circle of Excellence. Although this marks the fourth year that Jake Wilson has been distinguished with the Circle of Excellence award, it is the first time that the company has achieved the platinum level.

Jake Wilson works vigorously with third-party company Bizrate in order to collect unbiased reviews from customers based on their shopping experience. Bizrate’s rigorous standards for achieving the Platinum Circle of Excellence include achieving an average customer score of 9.0 (out of 10.0) across seven core categories: Overall Satisfaction, Product Selection, Ease of Finding, Likelihood to Buy Again, Product Met Expectations, On-Time Delivery and Satisfaction with Customer Support.

Of Bizrate’s network of thousands of online retailers, only 1.7% achieved this distinction in 2014. Although this was Jake Wilson’s first year among the elite platinum-level retailers, the company joined the ranks with impressive results. For example, not a single platinum-level retailer achieved a higher overall satisfaction rating than Jake Wilson did. In fact, Jake Wilson holds this distinction for several of the seven customer satisfaction indicators.

“We work hard to provide our customers with a high level of service. It’s one of the ways we distinguish ourselves from our competitors,” said Dan Thomas, CEO of Jake Wilson. “It is truly an honor to be recognized for our efforts with the Bizrate Platinum Circle of Excellence. We will keep working hard to achieve this award year after year.”

With the slogan Everything Street, Jake Wilson offers a variety of parts and accessories for sport bikes, cruisers and touring motorcycles. There were only two online retailers from the powersports industry that were awarded the Platinum Circle of Excellence in 2014.

For more information, visit www.JakeWilson.com.

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 Topic: From Germany, with love: Costa rides the 2015 S1000 RR
From Germany, with love: Costa rides the 2015 S1000 RR [message #6526] Fri, 17 October 2014 13:16
Anonymous

Just what is BMW's new superbike capable of? Costa reveals all after flogging it around the track.

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 Topic: Ninja H2 Video XVII Electronic Control + Video
Ninja H2 Video XVII Electronic Control + Video [message #6514] Fri, 17 October 2014 13:02
Anonymous

What’s that? You’ve had enough of Kawasaki’s teaser videos for the Ninja H2? Too bad. Here it is, the 17th video in a series we imagine will keep coming until the Ninja H2′s debut at EICMA on November 4. Anyway, in this video, we see a clear view of the H2′s dash and the myriad of electronic aids to help the rider tame what is sure to be a wild beast. Here we see the H2 will come equipped with KIBS (Kawasaki Intelligent anti-lock brakes), an electronic steering damper, power modes, KLCM (Kawasaki Launch Control Mode), KEBC (Kawasaki Engine Brake Control), KQS (Kawasaki Quick Shifter), and KTRC (Kawasaki Traction Control). From the clip we also see a huge gear position indicator…and a boost gauge! Check out the teaser video below.

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 Topic: BRD changes name, unveils new electric motorcycles
BRD changes name, unveils new electric motorcycles [message #6525] Fri, 17 October 2014 08:06
Anonymous

Battery bike maker will now be known as Alta; lineup now includes a tasty supermoto. Check out the gallery!

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 Topic: BMW continues to set sales records
BMW continues to set sales records [message #6524] Fri, 17 October 2014 07:33
Anonymous

German manufacturer sees consistent growth.

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 Topic: As seen on Facebook: Yamaha accidentally releases FJ-09 snap
As seen on Facebook: Yamaha accidentally releases FJ-09 snap [message #6523] Fri, 17 October 2014 07:07
Anonymous

Photo is more confirmation Yamaha will sell new sport tourer based on three-cylinder motor.

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 Topic: Friday Fudge
Friday Fudge [message #6522] Fri, 17 October 2014 01:54
Anonymous

This week in Friday Fudge: Outlaw bikers finally get the chance to prove they were born to be wild, thanks to ISIS.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: Shoei RF-1200 Helmet + Video
AIMExpo 2014: Shoei RF-1200 Helmet + Video [message #6513] Thu, 16 October 2014 23:56
Anonymous

Shoei was on hand at the 2014 AIMExpo in Orlando, Fla. to showcase its updated RF-1200 motorcycle helmet.

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

New for this year is a pinlock shield system with what Shoei calls the best anti-fog system available. As Shoei explains it, the shield acts as dual-plane glass, in that the shield has two layers of material with an air-bubble seal. As well, Shoei is coming out with a new Transitions shield design, which will transform from completely clear to almost a dark tint in about two minutes.

Shoei RF1200 Helmet Transitions Shield

Shoei boasts that the EPS liner in the RF-1200 contributed to the small size of the helmet. Shoei says it was able to reduce the size of the liner without sacrificing any of the impact-absorbing performance.

Shoei RF1200 Helmets Pair

To learn more about the RF1200 and Shoei’s other handmade motorcycle helmets, visit Shoei-Helmets.com.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: Scorpion Helmets + Video
AIMExpo 2014: Scorpion Helmets + Video [message #6512] Thu, 16 October 2014 23:33
Anonymous

Scorpion is showcasing a pair of motorcycle helmets at the 2014 AIMExpo in Orlando, Fla., the EXO-R710 and EXO-T1200.

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Scorpion EXO-R710

Scorpion EXO-R710 Helmet

Scorpion’s mid-level race helmet, the EXO-R710, starts at $189.95 for gloss black, but Scorpion offers a variety of color choices and two different graphic options.

Features on the EXO-R710 include a fibreglass/Aramid Matrix shell, EverClear no fog faceshield, KwikFit cheekpads, emergency release system and the same Elllip-Tec ratchet system found on Scorpion’s top-end models.

Scorpion EXO-T1200

Scorpion EXO-T1200 Helmet

A step up the Scorpion food chain is the EXO-T1200, which starts at $329.95 and comes in four solid colors and two different graphic options.

Features include titanium D-rings, TCT composite shell, three-step SpeedView SunVisor, AirFit liner inflation system, Venturi Super Vent system, KwikFit cheekpads, Ellip-Tec ratchet system and emergency release system.

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 Topic: 2015 BMW S1000RR First Ride Review
2015 BMW S1000RR First Ride Review [message #6501] Thu, 16 October 2014 22:36
Anonymous

2015 BMW S1000RR

Editor Score: 91.3%
Engine 19.8/20
Suspension/Handling 14.5/15
Transmission/Clutch 8.25/10
Brakes 10.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 9.0/10
Appearance/Quality 9.0/10
Desirability 8.75/10
Value 8.0/10
Overall Score91.3/100
Without 2015 pricing, we had to extrapolate the Value score based on previous S1000RR MSRPs and Package costs. Any deviation from normal BMW pricing may result in a better or worse Value score.

Hyped up on residual adrenalin from the previous day’s track outing at the Circuito Monteblanco, and feeling a little light-headed after visiting the open bar in the captain’s lounge at Adolfo Suárez Madrid–Barajas Airport (one hour flight delay), I began typing my 2015 BMW S1000RR review. Oh, S1K double R, how I love you, let me count the ways: Gear Shift Assist Pro, Dynamic Traction Control (DTC), Dynamic Damping Control (DDC), Cruise Control …

Wait a second – thought a more sober me somewhere mid-Atlantic – those aren’t stock items on the RR. You only get those goodies after spending the money to upgrade the base model RR with the Race Package (Pro riding mode, DTC, cruise control) and Dynamic Package (DDC, HP Gear Shift Assist Pro, heated grips, LED turn indicators). Tricky, BMW. Of course the attending media is gonna be enamored with a day aboard an RR outfitted to the tune of an HP4.

So, an evaluation of a base model S1000RR is gonna have to wait until we get a 2015 version in our possession, but if you’re thinking you might order an RR outfitted with the latest and greatest performance upgrades BMW has to offer, you’ll definitely want to hear what we have to say. The only thing we don’t know right now is how much it’ll cost you because BMW has not released 2015 pricing for the base model bike or its upgrade packages. Check back in about three weeks, says BMW.

Want to easily analyze your riding and improve your lap times? Our bikes were also equipped with the HP race data logger, which is a plug-and-play device for recording data such as road speed, engine speed, throttle position, gear position, corner speed, front and rear brake status, acceleration, lean angle, GPS position, ABS control range, DTC control and more.

Want to easily analyze your riding and improve your lap times? Our bikes were also equipped with the HP race data logger, which is a plug-and-play device for recording data such as road speed, engine speed, throttle position, gear position, corner speed, front and rear brake status, acceleration, lean angle, GPS position, ABS control range, DTC control and more.

Regardless your personal preferences of style, engine architecture, ergonomics, etcetera, BMW’s S1000RR is, inarguably, one helluva a damn good sportbike. I admittedly have an on-going love affair with Aprilia’s RSV4 – its handling and the oh so sexy sound of its V-Four exhaust note – but if it ever came down to me spending my own moola on the best all-around sportbike, I’d be hard pressed to buy the Aprilia over the BMW. The Beemer’s streetability is simply unbeatable in sportbikes terms.

2013 BMW S1000RR HP4 Review – Video

We’ve exhaustively reported on the principle changes to the 2015 S1000RR (2015 BMW S1000RR Preview + Video, Intermot 2014: 2015 BMW S1000RR) so I’ll dispatch with the formalities and get right into the riding impressions of this new double R.

Hard out of the final corner in second gear and onto the half-mile long front straight the double R reaches an indicated 160 mph in 5th gear before the combination of exceptional braking power, feel and modulation reduce speed to about 40 mph for navigating the hairpin right at the end of the straight.

Hard out of the final corner in second gear and onto the half-mile long front straight the double R reaches an indicated 160 mph in 5th gear before the combination of exceptional braking power, feel and modulation reduce speed to about 40 mph for navigating the hairpin right at the end of the straight.

According to BMW engineers and test riders the key phrase associated with the RR’s development is rider-friendliness. How to make a bike with 199 claimed horsepower manageable to the average road rider while keeping things exciting for hardcore track enthusiasts. In essence, BMW improved the S1000RR by way of broadening its appeal rather than by sharpening the scalpel.

2013 Exotic Superbike Shootout: Street – Video

For a liter bike, the tight Circuito Monteblanco is comprised largely of second gear corners. I tried first gear a few times but that only sent the bike’s DTC into a tizzy, providing no better corner exit grunt than second gear. This certainly gives credence to the RR engine’s widened torque curve. Firing the RR out of these second gear corners lofts the front wheel without provocation as the S1K’s inline-Four spins up revs, ferociously accelerating toward the next corner.

101614-2015-bmw-s1000rr-P90162372_highRes

The attractive, new oval muffler omits the under-engine portion of the old exhaust, trimming 6.6 pounds of the 2015 model’s 8.8 pound total weight reduction. The change helped to widen the Four’s torque curve while the weight loss improves the RR’s flickability.

The chicane at the back of the track provides a chance to slam the S double R left then right, but no matter the manhandling, the RR never gets out of shape. Not that the old model was unstable or slow to transition, but the changes to the frame (more flexibility in the lower frame rails), decreased weight, and tweaked steering head angle helps improve the handling characteristics of an already competent track weapon.

www.s1000rrforum.com

Dynamic Package
The Dynamic package brings Dynamic Damping Control (DDC), HP Gear Shift Assist Pro, heated grips and LED turn signals to the table. DDC was introduced on the HP4 two years ago. Since then BMW has refined the system to better react to changes in braking, accelerating, cornering as well as compensating for road surfaces, by way of a range of redefined settings.

One of the best examples I can think of is after reaching an indicated 160 mph at the first braking marker on the front straight I chop the throttle and grab a handful of front brake lever. The action is made easier knowing I have Race ABS working to my advantage, but helping keep things calm and maintain chassis neutrality is the DDC system that reacts in milliseconds to tighten the front end against dramatically compressing. By maintaining this chassis neutrality and keeping things calm I’m better able to focus on corner entry and proper apexing rather than being over-excited about the extreme braking forces in play.

Move the Gear Shift Assist Pro linkage from its attachment point at the front of the shift lever to the attachment point nearer your toe and, voila, you’ve a GP shift pattern.

Move the Gear Shift Assist Pro linkage from its attachment point at the front of the shift lever to the attachment point nearer your toe and, voila, you’ve a GP shift pattern.

The other uber cool technology in the Dynamic package is HP Gear Shift Assist Pro – a quick-shifter for both up- and downshifts. HP Gear Shift Assist Pro makes riding fast almost ridiculously easy. Clutching out of the of pits you never touch the clutch lever again while on the track. However, where the upshifts come in rapid succession with a light pressure on the shift lever, the downshifts require more pressure to engage, and the feeling isn’t quite as intuitive.

2012 BMW S1000RR Review

Entering turn one I repeatedly found myself glancing down at the gear position indicator to ensure I was in the gear I wanted prior to entering the turn. On one hand the system works seamlessly in regards to matching engine RPM to wheel speed under heavy braking without disrupting the chassis. What would help is a better feel at the shift lever indicating that, indeed, a lower gear has been selected.

You also can’t rapid-fire the downshifts as quickly as you might using the clutch. There’s a push on the lever, a pause and a push on the lever. A few times downshifting from second to first, the result ended up with the transmission in neutral and me frantically trying to compensate before blowing the turn.

101614-2015-bmw-s1000rr-_D3_2370

The 2015 RR is 8.8 pounds lighter than last year’s model, but still 10 pounds heavier than a 2014 HP4. Purchasing the forged wheels (standard on the HP4) from BMW’s accessory catalog lops off 5.5 pounds, bringing the RR down to 444.2 wet pounds, only 5.2 more than the HP4.

Race Package
The stock RR comes equipped with three riding modes: Rain, Sport, Race. The Race package adds two new riding modes, Slick and User. The Slick mode is even more track oriented than Race mode, but is still managed by predefined settings, whereas User mode enables a rider to customize settings for Race ABS, DTC, DDC and engine response. Like the ride modes, all of these settings are only a button push away, which leads us to BMW’s very exciting DTC.

We’ve commended Apriila’s on-the-fly adjustable traction control since its inception, and now we can lend that same approval to BMW. From 7 (most intrusive) to -7 (least intrusive) a rider can now adapt traction control to changing track conditions. With a wet but drying track the day of our test ride, we got to sample this adjustment and, like that of the RSV’s, we liked it!

101614-2015-bmw-s1000rr-P90162370_highRes

Instrumentation is similar to the old model with an easy to read analog tach, centrally placed shift indicator and digital LCD screen. There’s a lot of information in that small screen, but, like the rest of the bike, the display and its contents are adjustable.

And let us not forget the third element of the Race package, cruise control. While there’s no testing cruise control on the racetrack, we have to assume it to be the same as with other BMW models offering the technology, which works wonderfully when travelling in non-racetrack environments. We’re not sure why BMW included cruise control in a package with track-specific performance upgrades such as DDC, Slick and User ride modes, but you can purchase the cruise control separately if so desired.

+ Highs

  • Insanely awesome brakes
  • Most rider-friendly 200-hp motorcycle ever
  • Basically an HP4
- Sighs

  • What’s it cost?
  • The more technology there is, the more that can go wrong
  • We’re just making stuff up because this bike is awesome

Since its release, BMW’s S1000RR has excelled in impressing the motorcycling press, winning numerous awards from MO as well as other motorcycle publications. In North America the double R is in the top five of BMW’s best selling models.

So, how does one go about improving near sportbike perfection? That’s a question BMW engineers exhaustively considered before embarking on a tweaked version of their preeminent sportbike. After having spent a day aboard the double R circulating the Circuito Monteblanco, outside Sevilla, Spain, one’s things certain, BMW certainly did not make it worse.

101614-2015-bmw-s1000rr-P90162353_highRes

Restyled front fairing announces the RR’s newness while maintaining a recognizable association to the old model. The enlarged air intake inhales enough atmosphere to swallow Dorothy and her little dog, too.

2015 BMW S1000RR Specifications
MSRP NA
Engine Capacity 999cc
Engine Type Inline Four-cylinder
Bore x Stroke 80mm x 49.7mm
Compression 13.0
Fuel System EFI
Transmission Constant mesh 6-speed
Final Drive Chain
Frame Aluminum twin-spar
Front Suspension Fully adjustable 46mm inverted telescopic fork
Rear Suspension Fully adjustable monoshock
Front Brakes Twin radial mount calipers, 320mm discs
Rear Brakes Single caliper, 220mm disc
Front Tire 120/70-17
Rear Tire 190/55-17
Seat Height 32.1 inches
Wheelbase 56.1 inches
Curb Weight 449.7 pounds
Fuel Capacity 17.5 liters
Colors Racing Red/Light White, Black Storm Metallic, BMW Motorsport

2015 BMW S1000RR First Ride Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: CST Off-Road Tires + Video
AIMExpo 2014: CST Off-Road Tires + Video [message #6500] Thu, 16 October 2014 22:27
Anonymous

We checked out the CST Tires booth at AIMExpo and learned about three new off-road motorcycle tires – the Legion MX-VI, Legion Desert and Legion Trials.

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Legion MX-V1

CST LegionMX-VI Tire

CST calls the Legion MX-V1 an intermediate moto tire. It features long, varied tread patches designed for good hookup in a variety of soil conditions found on intermediate motocross tracks. CST says center tread knobs on the rear tire claw forward and clean out, while more tightly spaced shoulder knobs provide a stable platform for traction when leaned over. As well, CST boats that the uniquely shaped shoulder knobs on the front tire deliver “extreme braking traction and control” in cornering situations.

Legion Desert

CST Legion Desert Tire

Intended for rocky, desert terrain, CST says the Legion Desert tires combine a front tire with a consistent center tread for smooth rolling, paired with aggressive shoulder knobs for extra bite while turning and maintaining traction in sandy areas. The rear features a large contact patch, designed to keep more of the rubber hooked up on the ground.

Legion Trials

CST Legion Trials Tire

CST’s Legion Trials tire boasts ultra-soft rubber compounds and dynamic tread design. CST says this tire excels in a variety of applications including dirt, rocks, roots and gravel

Visit CSTTires.com for more information.

AIMExpo 2014: CST Off-Road Tires + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Suzuki MotoGP GSX-RR Poster Available Online
Suzuki MotoGP GSX-RR Poster Available Online [message #6499] Thu, 16 October 2014 20:11
Anonymous

To commemorate Suzuki’s return to MotoGP next year, the company has released a poster with its GSX-RR front and center. Surrounding it is Suzuki test riders Nobu Aoki and Randy de Puniet, who will be competing as a wildcard at the season ending race at Valencia before jumping to World Superbike next year with the Voltcom Crescent Suzuki Team.

Click here to download the poster in all its high-resolution glory.

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 Topic: Bell Teams With Schott NYC On Limited Edition Jacket
Bell Teams With Schott NYC On Limited Edition Jacket [message #6498] Thu, 16 October 2014 19:53
Anonymous

From a Bell press release:


Bell Helmets, an industry leader in helmet technology and innovation, and Schott NYC, quality leather sportswear since 1913, have collaborated on a limited edition line of Bell X Schott NYC Café Racer leather jackets. Commemorating Bell’s 60th Anniversary, the 250 limited-edition, individually-numbered jackets feature a classic design reminiscent of classic Americana motorcycle culture established by Bell Helmets and Schott NYC.

Both Bell and Schott NYC have a rich heritage in the United States, interwoven into the fabric of American motorcycle culture. Bell is representative of the classic blue-collar American ethos, starting out of a garage in 1954 when founder Roy Richter and his auto racing friends realized the critical need for head protection. Richter was responsible for the development of the modern motorcycle helmet as we know it, and Bell Helmets has since been an industry leader in innovative head protection for powersports and cycling enthusiasts for 60 years.

Schott NYC celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2013 and carries a similar DNA based in classic American ingenuity. Founded by brothers Irving and Jack Schott, who began by peddling raincoats door to door out of a basement on the lower East Side of Manhattan. The two went on to design the first leather motorcycle jacket, the “bomber jacket” for the U.S. Army Air Corps in WWII, and having the jacket worn by the likes of Marlon Brando and James Dean.

“Aside from serving as the ultimate attire and protection for riders, Schott NYC and Bell have long been recognized as two of the original staples of motorcycle culture in America,” said Casey Potter, Bell Helmets Creative Director. “This was a truly special opportunity to bring these two iconic brands together to create this limited edition jacket that exudes the American spirit of motorcycling to celebrate Bell’s 60th Anniversary.”

“We’re excited to have teamed up with Bell Helmets and celebrate its 60th anniversary milestone with these limited edition jackets, said Jason Schott, Chief Operating Officer and 4th Generation family member at Schott NYC. “The Bell X Schott NYC Café Racer Jacket is a one-of-a-kind classic that marries the iconic look and feel of our historic companies.”

Bell X Schott NYC Café Racer Jacket Key Features:

  • Premium horse hide shell
  • Classic slim fit Café Racer design
  • Steerhide tonal rally stripe detail
  • Tonal Bell logo patch on left shoulder
  • Custom 1954 punch detail on wind flap
  • Fully lined with custom red satin
  • Zip-out black pile liner
  • Bi-swing back
  • Zippered sleeves and pockets
  • Individually numbered
  • Limited edition of only 250
  • Made in the U.S.A.

Available October 2014 at select retail locations and online at www.bellhelmets.com, the Bell X Schott NYC Café Racer jacket will retail for $900. For more information visit www.bellhelmets.com.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: Bridgestone Tires + Video
AIMExpo 2014: Bridgestone Tires + Video [message #6497] Thu, 16 October 2014 19:20
Anonymous

Bridgestone had three new tires on display at AIMExpo in Orlando, Fla. The Battlax Adventure A40, Battlax Racing Street RS10 and Battlax Hypersport S20 EVO.

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Bridgestone Battlax Adventure A40

Bridgestone Battlax A40

This adventure-touring tire is designed for big adventure motorcycles. Intended primarily for on-road use, it benefits from a mono-spiral belt for a good footprint on the pavement. For those who do venture off the beaten path, the deep tread pattern is designed to provide good traction for hard-packed surfaces.

Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S20 EVO

Bridgestone S20 EVO

A new version of Bridgestone’s S20 sportbike tire, the S20 EVO features a three-layer compound on the back tire. This is designed to provide good grip on soft shoulders while remaining firm in the center for good mileage. Bridgestone also says it provides a bigger footprint front and rear, so it hooks up well.

Bridgestone Battlax Racing Street RS10

Bridgestone RS10

This tire is intended for track day or aggressive street riding use. It has minimal tread pattern, but Bridgestone says it’s beveled to provide a good footprint with a lot of grip. As well, Bridgestone notes it offers slightly better durability than other tires in the category, so you can get some mileage on the track or the street. Finally, this tire benefits from a lot of MotoGP technology with its dual compounds.

Visit BridgestoneMotorcycleTires.com for more information.

AIMExpo 2014: Bridgestone Tires + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec First Look Video
AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec First Look Video [message #6496] Thu, 16 October 2014 18:15
Anonymous

MO E-i-C Kevin Duke offers his first-hand look of the new 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec, a café racer-ish cruiser that debuted today at AIMExpo in Orlando.

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View our earlier post for more information about the Star Bolt C-Spec and other 2015 Star models.

Follow the rest of our 2014 AIMExpo coverage for more information on new 2015 motorcycle announcements.

AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec First Look Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Yamaha R3 First Look Video
AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Yamaha R3 First Look Video [message #6495] Thu, 16 October 2014 17:54
Anonymous

MO E-i-C Kevin Duke offers his first-hand look of the new 2015 Yamaha YZF-R3 right from the AIMExpo show floor.

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View our earlier post for more information about the 2015 Yamaha R3.

Follow the rest of our 2014 AIMExpo coverage for more information on new 2015 motorcycle announcements.

AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Yamaha R3 First Look Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: MotoGP 2014 Phillip Island Preview
MotoGP 2014 Phillip Island Preview [message #6494] Thu, 16 October 2014 17:31
Anonymous

In what is likely to be a preview of the rest of the decade in MotoGP, three Aliens not named Marquez will begin their assault on the vice-championship this week at Phillip Island. Heading into Round 16 Down Under, a mere three points separate Yamaha ironman Jorge Lorenzo from teammate Valentino Rossi, who sits tied with Repsol Honda mini-Marc Dani Pedrosa. While world champion Marc Marquez’ mom dusts off some space in the family trophy case for the 2014 hardware, there’s plenty of racing left this season.

Late in 2012, while MotoGP legend Casey Stoner was busy winning his sixth consecutive Australian GP here, we suggested it might be fitting to rename the track Stoner Island, an idea widely ignored in Australia but adopted, strangely enough, in San Marino, which renamed its own circuit in memory of the late Marco Simoncelli. Given the fact that Simoncelli missed his chance to win a premier class race, while Stoner’s victory count is somewhere in the 40s, you wouldn’t expect much resistance to the idea from the locals, who have precious little else to brag about. A couple of tennis players from back in the 60’s, maybe. Whatever.

Who, you may be wondering, holds the record for the second-most wins at Phillip Island, presuming Stoner owns the record? I mean, after all, we’re squarely in the midst of trying to generate some excitement over an impending battle for second place in 2014. So, again, who has the second most career wins at Phillip Island? Casey Stoner, that’s who, with his six. Valentino Rossi, with seven, holds the record, with one win having come in the 500cc class in 2001 and two in the 250cc class in 1998 and 1999. OK, so Stoner had the most premier class wins; we’ll give him an asterisk for his trouble.

Speaking of Australians, Remy Gardner, son of former World Champion Wayne Gardner will make his Grand Prix debut at Phillip Island, wildcarding in the Moto3 class.

Now, for $500 and the game, who won the race in 2006, in between Rossi’s four in a row and Stoner’s six? Nicky Hayden? No, dude has only three career wins in the premier class, none of which came in Australia. Dani Pedrosa? No, he was a sullen, aggressive rookie in 2006 and finished 15th that year. Drum roll, please … the winner of the 2006 Australian Grand Prix was … Marco Melandri onboard the Gresini Honda.

More Recent History at Phillip Island

2012 marked the last of Stoner’s six wins at his home crib. That year, Lorenzo struggled to second place, some nine seconds in arrears. Five seconds behind Lorenzo was Cal Crutchlow on the Tech 3 Yamaha, scoring his second career podium in the premier class that day. Pedrosa, pedaling as hard as he could over the second half of the season to catch leader Lorenzo, lost his marbles on Lap 2 and saw his day and his season come to another dismal end. The best race-in-the-race that day saw Andrea Dovizioso win a thrilling run to the flag, punking both Alvaro Bautista and Stefan Bradl and their respective Hondas by a few hundredths of a second.

Last year’s race was a debacle, with riders required to change bikes before the end of Lap 10 as the new track surface made mincemeat out of tires.

Last year’s race was a fiasco from start to finish. Over the previous winter, the track owners had invested $3 million resurfacing the circuit, making it the grippiest, fastest circuit on the calendar. And, incidentally, the most rubber-hungry surface on earth. With its host of high-speed bends, the riders were generating enormous amounts of heat in the tires, which were decomposing beneath them as fast as the crews could put them on. Bridgestone, in its infinite wisdom (read: unwillingness to spend the money testing their tires on the new surface), arrived in Australia to a symphony of complaints, ranging from Carmelo Ezpeleta to the kid who drives Jorge Lorenzo’s scooter in the pit area.

By Sunday, Race Direction was issuing Orders of the Day every half hour. The race was shortened from 27 laps to 26, then to 19, then to 19 with a mandatory tire change by the end of Lap 10. The teams set up two bikes for each rider, each equipped with soft tires and half a tank of gas, and the lights went out. As Lap 10 was ending, Lorenzo and Marquez were leading, running shoulder to shoulder. Lorenzo exited into pit lane as Marquez, inexplicably, kept right on going, only to pit at the end of Lap 11.

Valentino Rossi checks out a Yamaha Tricity scooter decked out in his M1 livery. He doesn’t seem impressed.

The combination of a flurry of ad hoc rule changes being translated into three or four different languages with riders’ lives and millions of dollars of machinery hanging in the balance proved too much for Marquez and his team, whose late tire change resulted in a black flag DQ on Lap 15, handing the race to Lorenzo. The win kept the Mallorcan in contention for the title, which he only grudgingly surrendered two weeks later in Valencia. Pedrosa and Rossi made up the rest of the podium, with Rossi pipping Crutchlow and Bautista at the finish for the only satisfying moment of the entire day.

You Heard It Here Last

We have been somewhat derelict in keeping up with the rider changes happening in the second echelon of MotoGP in preparation for the 2015 season. This is due in part to the fact that every single motorcycle publication on earth has published the abundant team press releases, including ourselves. At this point, all but two or three seats have been claimed.

Familiar faces changing livery for 2015 are headlined by Crutchlow and Bradl, as the Brit takes over for Bradl on the #1 LCR Honda and Bradl downshifts to join Forward Racing. Danilo Petrucci goes from the Ioda Racing frying pan to the Pramac Ducati fire, where he will join Yonny Hernandez on the junior Corse team. And Aleix Espargaro gets to realize his dream of riding for a factory team, as he moves from Forward Racing’s Open class machine to the new Suzuki GSX-RR.

Randy de Puniet has been busy testing Suzuki’s GSX-RR. Despite his efforts, he won’t be riding it next season, being rewarded instead with a WSBK contract.

At least four new faces will grace the grid next season. The Drive 7 Aspar team is giving Hiro Aoyama the boot in favor of Eugene Laverty, who joins the premier class, alongside teammate Nicky Hayden, after several productive seasons in World Superbike. With Paul Byrd folding up his tent next year, we are spared the sight of two Lavertys on the grid, as brother Michael is “evaluating opportunities” in WSBK and British Superbike, i.e., scrambling to find some kind of ride on road courses rather than dirt ovals.

Up-and-coming Moto2 grad Maverick Vinales brings his game to MotoGP joining Aleix Espargaro on the factory Suzuki. Forward Racing, having ejected Colin Edwards and, in turn, been jilted by the elder Espargaro, will make a go of it with Bradl and Frenchman Loris Baz, all 6’3” of him, who will try to fold himself around the Yamaha powered machine, elbows and knees sticking out all over the place, sure to remind some of us of Super Sic the way he used to look on his Gresini Honda. But without question, the highest profile rookie heading into 2015 will be Jack Miller, the young Australian skipping a grade, moving directly to the premier class from Moto3 on a three year deal with LCR Honda, the first of which is likely to be spent in various hospitals around the globe. Crikey, but that’s a steep learning curve, Mr. Miller.

Jack Miller throws another shrimp on the barbie. He’ll be skipping Moto2 to move up to the MotoGP class next season.

Fausto Gresini, in his eternal quest for Italian riders for his satellite squad, has abandoned his relationship with Honda in favor of a low budget operation with Aprilia for the next few years, with Bautista somehow retaining his #1 seat with the team, a second rider yet to be named. Scott Redding moves to Marc VDS Racing and their shiny new factory spec Honda, which should elevate the Brit’s game and set up some interesting fights with countryman Crutchlow on the same bike. Hayden, Laverty, Miller and Karel Abraham will be the beneficiaries of an upgrade in the so-called customer Hondas, as the Japanese factory switches out the severely underpowered RCV1000R in favor of what they’re calling the 213V-RS, powered by this year’s fire-breathing RC213V engine in conjunction with a standard ECU and complete with Open class fuel, engine, testing and tire concessions.

Like I said 1400 words ago, there’s still plenty going on in MotoGP. The Marquez Years are upon us, and we must look past young Marc, seeking our pleasure in the profane, the ridiculous and the sublime, all of which are in lavish supply as the 2014 season wends its way to the finish line at Valencia in November.

We’ll have Phillip Island results right here on Sunday evening.

It’s a short week since last weekend’s Motegi round but some riders still got a chance to take in some surfing lessons ahead of this weekend’s race.

MotoGP 2014 Phillip Island Preview appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: 2015 Yamaha FJ-09 Leaked
2015 Yamaha FJ-09 Leaked [message #6493] Thu, 16 October 2014 16:43
Anonymous

It’s been a busy day for Yamaha, revealing a new YZF-R3 entry-level sportbike, the YZ250FX and WR250R off-road bikes and the SMax scooter on top of some 2015 Star models. And let’s not forget the new teaser for the 2015 R1. We’ve certainly been busy keeping up with the new model announcements, and we expect the people running Yamaha’s website were as well.

That would explain this image of the new (and still not-yet-announced) Yamaha FJ-09 that momentarily popped up on Yamaha’s official FZ-09 photo gallery page. The image has since been taken down from Yamaha’s site, but not before a member of the ADVRider forum downloaded a copy of it.

This marks the fourth time we’ve uncovered evidence of the new adventure-styled three-cylinder sport-tourer. First came the trademark application for the name FJ-09, then came the design patent which showed us what it’ll look like, followed by the certification documents from the California Air Resources Board that confirmed the FJ-09 was on its way to the U.S. for 2015.

Well now we know what the FJ-09 looks like in color, sporting a silvery-gray color. We’re sure Yamaha will have other color options available, but we’ll likely have to wait until EICMA in November for the official announcement. Unless of course we find something more ahead of time.

[Source: Yamaha via ADVRider]

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha YZ250FX and WR250F Announced
AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha YZ250FX and WR250F Announced [message #6492] Thu, 16 October 2014 14:47
Anonymous

Yamaha revealed two new 250cc off-road race bikes in the WR250F enduro and YZ250FX closed-course racer.

The two machines share the same basic DNA, featuring the same 249cc rearwardly-slanted single-cylinder engine and a similar bilateral beam frame from the YZ250F motocrosser. Yamaha added a sixth gear for the new models as well as electric start and swapped out the YZ250F’s 19-inch wheel for 18-inchers.

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The YZ250FX is tuned more for cross country or hare scramble competition, with specifically tuned fuel mapping and cross country optimized clutch plate, springs, push lever and oil valve. The KYB air/oil separation Speed Sensitive System fork and rear shock are specifically tuned for the rigors of cross country racing. The FX also comes equipped with Dunlop AT81 tires designed specifically for cross country racing.

Other features for the FX include quick-adjust clutch, quick-release quarter-turn Dzus air box fasteners and a 2.1-gallon fuel tank. The YZ250FX also comes pre-wired for an optional radiator fan.

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The WR250F shares many of the same characteristics as the FX but is tuned more for enduro competition. Yamaha added a headlight, taillight, skid plate electric radiator fan and onboard enduro computer offering speedometer, odometer, average speed, clock and other information. The suspension and fuel injection are tuned for enduro riding, while the wheels are wrapped in enduro-spec rubbers. The WR250F is also 50-state compliant for off-road use.

The 2015 Yamaha YZ250FX is priced at $7,890 while the WR250F costs a bit more at $7,990. Both models will be offered in Team Yamaha Blue and White and are expected in showrooms in November.

2015 Yamaha YZ250FX Pictures

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2015 Yamaha WR250F Pictures

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Follow the rest of our 2014 AIMExpo coverage for more information on new 2015 motorcycle announcements.

AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha YZ250FX and WR250F Announced appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec Plus Others Announced + Video
AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec Plus Others Announced + Video [message #6491] Thu, 16 October 2014 14:31
Anonymous

Star Motorycles added to its popular Bolt line of cruisers today with the introduction of the new Bolt C-Spec. Astute readers can probably guess what the C stands for, but we’ll clear it up, right away. Café-styled motorcycles have always been popular, and right now, they are hot. Since Star sees the Bolt as a platform for customization, it only makes sense that it would want to help customers along by providing them with a café-ed canvas to begin their personalization.

Using the same 950cc engine and chassis as the rest of the Bolt line plus the shocks from the R-Spec, the Bolt C-Spec features such niceties as clip-on handlebars (with sportier switch gear) for a more assertive riding stance. The rider’s interaction with the C-Spec is improved by foot pegs that were relocated 5.9 in. rearward and about 1 in. higher. The peg placement not only puts the rider in a more sporting position, but also increases the Bolt’s lean angle from 33° to 37° of cornering fun.

Bolt C-Spec Green

Clip-ons and fork boots for a café look. Clip-ons and relocated pegs for better performance.

The fork’s stanchions are dressed up (and protected) by traditional, rubber boots. The speedometer has been moved from below the handlebar to above it for better visibility. The seat gains a removable pillion cowl to add to the sporty-factor. Finally, the “sport café paint” comes in two spiffy colors, Liquid Silver and Envy Green, and feature two-color racing stripes on the tank and rear fender. Like the rest of the Bolt line, the C-Spec has steel fenders and tons of factory accessories for putting an individual touch on each one.

The Bolt C-Spec will retail for $8,690 ($300 more than the R-Spec) and will arrive in dealerships in January 2015.

Stryker Bullet Cowl Green

How do you spell badass? B-U-L-L-E-T C-O-W-L.

Raider and Stryker Bullet Cowl Editions

Star also announced new editions to the 2015 Raider and Stryker cruisers. The Raider Bullet Cowl brings the Raider line to a total of three models: Raider, Raider S, and Raider Bullet Cowl, while the Stryker Bullet Cowl becomes the second Stryker. Both Bullet Cowl models will benefit from wind protection at highway speeds, making those long rides much more enjoyable. Additionally, the cowls give both an even more aggressive visage, augmenting the muscular good looks of the two V-Twin powered bikes.

The 1304cc Stryker Bullet Cowl adds a blacked out exhaust and air-cleaner to its raked-out styling. Retailing for$12,090, the 2015 Stryker Bullet Cowl will arrive in dealerships this month in Camo Green.

Raider Bullet Cowl Black

113 cubic-inches of Bullet Cowled attitude.

Also arriving in October, the $15,390 Raider Bullet Cowl will sport a Raven color scheme in addition to the cowl giving the “bone crushing” 1854cc (113 cu. in.) V-Twin even more of a top dog stance.

Follow the rest of our 2014 AIMExpo coverage for more information on new 2015 motorcycle announcements.

AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec Plus Others Announced + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Yamaha Announces 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec, as Well as Bullet Cowl Raider and Stryker (Bike Reports) (News)
Yamaha Announces 2015 Star Bolt C-Spec, as Well as Bullet Cowl Raider and Stryker (Bike Reports) (News) [message #6511] Thu, 16 October 2014 13:28
Anonymous
Not to be outdone by Kawasaki’s new Vulcan S, Yamaha showed off its new addition to the Star Bolt lineup of retro-styled middleweight cruisers, the Bolt C-Spec. It also showed a pair of heavyweight cruisers upgraded with bullet-style fairings. The C-Spec gives Bolt riders a more sporting option, and it isn’t just dressed up for the […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: New Yamaha Teaser Confirms Updated YZF-R1 for EICMA
New Yamaha Teaser Confirms Updated YZF-R1 for EICMA [message #6490] Thu, 16 October 2014 12:39
Anonymous

Earlier this month, Yamaha released a video teasing a superport model announcement for EICMA that we expected to be an updated 2015 YZF-R1. At AIMExpo, Yamaha confirmed our suspicions with a new video starring Valentino Rossi and Josh Hayes and the tagline “We R1“.

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The video reveals a few brief glimpses of the R1, mostly as a blur beneath Rossi’s familiar yellow leathers. We do get  good glimpse of the new R1′s digital display reaching a speed of 262 kph (163 mph) in fifth gear. We also see a digital tach, selectable power modes and traction control. The SCS symbol in the bottom right is a bit of a mystery, perhaps representing an electronic “Suspension Control System” or possibly “Stability Control System”. There is another symbol along the top that looks like a shock reading “A-2″ so that could be some form of electronic suspension control as well. Also visible are the acronyms QS (quickshifter?) LIF and on the right side is a meter showing front-and-rear weight distribution.

101614-2015-yamaha-yzf-r1-teaser-display

A quick look along the left side from an onboard camera reveals just a hint of the engine and fairing, but Yamaha is careful not to reveal too much.

101614-2015-yamaha-yzf-r1-teaser-left-closeup

The final detail is something people might miss if they stop playing the video too early. The video shows two slanted LED headlights illuminate in a pleasant hum before showing a link to www.Yamaha-We-R1.com where Yamaha will live stream its press launch at EICMA on Nov 3.

101614-2015-yamaha-yzf-r1-teaser-led-lights

101614-2015-yamaha-yzf-r1-teaser-rossi

[Source: Yamaha]

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha Introduces 2015 SMAX Scooter To America
AIMExpo 2014: Yamaha Introduces 2015 SMAX Scooter To America [message #6489] Thu, 16 October 2014 12:13
Anonymous

In August, we reported on a CARB executive order on a new scooter from Yamaha we suspected would compete with the Honda PCX150. Today at the AIMExpo, Yamaha unveiled to the U.S. market the SMAX sport scooter.

Indeed a challenger to the PCX150 from Honda, the SMAX could be considered a little sibling to the larger, more luxurious Majesty scooter due to its similar styling. Powered by a 155cc, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, SOHC fuel-injected engine, the SMAX is powerful enough for freeway jaunts and should have plenty of power for the city run-around. The continuously variable transmission means the rider doesn’t have to worry about shifting – just hop on and ride.

Yamaha says the new frame design contributes to its sporty handling, but more important for scooter riders, the SMAX is reported to have 32 liters of underseat storage, big enough for a full-face helmet and then some. If that’s not enough, Yamaha accessories for the SMAX include a top case and a center console bag.

The SMAX rolls on 13-inch wheels, while disc brakes at both ends ensure confident stopping power.

The SMAX will be available in two color options – Ultramarine Blue and Matte Titan – and will retail for $3,690, with bikes available in dealerships by November.

Follow the rest of our 2014 AIMExpo coverage for more information on new 2015 motorcycle announcements.

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 Topic: AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Yamaha YZF-R3 Coming to America
AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Yamaha YZF-R3 Coming to America [message #6488] Thu, 16 October 2014 11:46
Anonymous

Yamaha revealed its new 320cc YZF-R3, bringing in MotoGP star Colin Edwards and his wife Alyssia to ride the entry-level sportbike before the gather media at AIMExpo in Orlando, Fla.

Discuss this at our Yamaha R3 Forum.

While its traditional competitors such as Honda and Kawasaki engaged in an incremental (small) displacement war with its CBR and Ninja, Yamaha followed KTM in entering the U.S. market by skipping directly into the 300s with the new R3 instead of importing the YZF-R25 introduced earlier this year for Asian markets. Though still down a few cubic centimeters from the KTM RC390, the 321cc R3 should still hold an edge over the CBR300R and Ninja 300.

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The R3′s liquid-cooled parallel-Twin engine has a 68.0mm bore, giving it an 8.0mm advantage over the R25. The stroke is 44.1mm, the same as the R25′s powerplant. Like the R1 and R6, the engine uses forged aluminum pistons for light weight and higher strength when the engine gets hot. Other features include an off-set cylinder to reduce power loss to friction and a 180-degree crank.

Yamaha Motor USA did not provide any performance figures but its European counterpart says the Euro model produces 42 hp at 10,750 rpm and 21.8 ft-lb. at 9000 rpm. U.S.-spec figures may differ to meet emission requirements, though Yamaha Motor USA did confirm peak power arrives at 10,750 rpm.

101614-2015-yamaha-yzf-r3-16

The engine is a load-bearing part of the chassis, mounted to the high tensile steel tube frame. KYB supplies the 41mm telescopic fork offering 5.1 inches of travel. The KYB rear shock offering 4.9 inches of travel. Like the R1, the R3′s swingarm is longer than what you’d typically find, giving it the same swingarm to wheelbase ratio as the literbike. Yamaha says this provides strong straight-line handling performance and more efficient power delivery.

Discuss this at our Yamaha R25 Forum.

The braking system consists of a two-piston caliper paired with a 298mm disc up front and a 220mm disc with single-piston caliper at the rear.

Visually, the R3 also borrows from its larger R-series siblings, with similar lines and slanted dual headlights.

101614-2015-yamaha-yzf-r3-33

Other features include 17-inch 10-spoke cast aluminum wheels, multi-function display, 30.7-inch seat height and a 3.7-gallon fuel tank. Yamaha claims a wet weight of 368 pounds.

Yamaha will offer three color options: Raven, Rapid Red, and Team Yamaha Blue/Matte Silver.  Expect to see the R3 arrive in showrooms in January 2015 with a $4990 price tag.

2015 Yamaha YZF-R3 Specifications
Engine Type 321cc, liquid-cooled 2-cylinder DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
Bore x Stroke 68.0 x 44.1mm
Compression Ratio 11.2:1
Fuel Delivery Fuel Injected
Ignition TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Transmission Constant mesh; 6-speed transmission
Final Drive Chain
Suspension / Front 41mm KYB telescopic fork; 5.1 in of travel
Suspension / Rear KYB single shock; 4.9 in of travel
Brakes Front Hydraulic, 298mm
Brakes / Rear Hydraulic, 220mm
Tires / Front 110/70-17M/C 54H
Tires Rear 140/70-17M/C 66H
L x W x H 82.3 x 28.3 x 44.7 in
Seat Height 30.7 in
Wheelbase 54.3 in
Rake (Caster Angle) 25°
Trail 3.7 in
Fuel Capacity 3.7 gal
Fuel Economy N/A
Wet Weight 368 lb
Warranty 1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)
MSRP $4,990 – Raven – Available from January 2015
$4,990 – Team Yamaha Blue/Matte Silver – Available from January 2015
$4,990 – Rapid Red – Available from January 2015

Follow the rest of our 2014 AIMExpo coverage for more information on new 2015 motorcycle announcements.

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 Topic: New SMAX scooter from Yamaha
New SMAX scooter from Yamaha [message #6509] Thu, 16 October 2014 11:41
Anonymous

New 155 cc scooter coming to Canada

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Current Time: Mon Oct 20 17:10:15 EDT 2014