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Forum: Vendor Forum (HTML Format)
 Topic: BrakeAway Motorcycle Cruise Control Now Online - at Dynamic Cycle Parts - Woodbridge
BrakeAway Motorcycle Cruise Control Now Online - at Dynamic Cycle Parts - Woodbridge [message #6929] Wed, 26 November 2014 12:48
Anonymous
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http://dynamiccycleparts.com/Motorcy...ntrol_c227.htm


Safe Reliable operation Affordable alternative to electronic cruise
Easy Push Button Engagement
Adjust throttle to any position while engaged
Immediate Release triggered by the Front Brake or Manual lever
Easy Installation
Looks and feels integrated with factory controls
Highest Quality Billet components Made In the USA




Accepting Paypal, Visa, MC, Amex and Debit

Phone: 289-371-3025
Fax: 289-371-3024
Cell Phone or Text Message: 416-300-5957


www.dynamiccycleparts.com

Dynamic Cycle Parts
271 Jevlan Drive Unit 14
Woodbridge, ON L4L 8A4
CANADA

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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Black friday - Early Bird Start!!! (Ends Sat Nov 29, 2014)
Black friday - Early Bird Start!!! (Ends Sat Nov 29, 2014) [message #6907] Mon, 24 November 2014 10:59
Anonymous
Hello Fellow GTAM Members!

Come to Riders Choice and Check Out Our Black Friday Specials All Week!

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Shoei X-12 Clearout!!!
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$599.99+HST


Feel Free to Stop By and Check Out What's Available!

All Prices Listed Are Cash or Debit Plus Applicable Taxes.
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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Black friday @ blue streak racing
Black friday @ blue streak racing [message #6899] Sun, 23 November 2014 13:28
Anonymous
We haven't forgotten.

BLACK FRIDAY THRU TO CYBER MONDAY.

Details to come.

Cheers

Tony

519 475 9055
bsrtech@xplornet.com
www.bluestreakracing.ca

From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: HeliBars Now Online - FREE CANADA SHIPPING - at Dynamic Cycle Parts Vaughan
HeliBars Now Online - FREE CANADA SHIPPING - at Dynamic Cycle Parts Vaughan [message #6898] Sun, 23 November 2014 09:23
Anonymous
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http://www.dynamiccycleparts.com/HeliBars_c213.htm



Accepting Paypal, Visa, MC, Amex and Debit

Phone: 289-371-3025
Fax: 289-371-3024
Cell Phone or Text Message: 416-300-5957


http://www.dynamiccycleparts.com

Dynamic Cycle Parts
271 Jevlan Drive Unit 14
Woodbridge, ON L4L 8A4
CANADA

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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Black friday - early bird start!!! (ends sat nov 12, 2014)
Black friday - early bird start!!! (ends sat nov 12, 2014) [message #6896] Sat, 22 November 2014 16:45
Anonymous
Hello Fellow GTAM Members!

Come to Riders Choice and Check Out Our Black Friday Specials All Week!

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$599.99+HST

Feel Free to Stop By and Check Out What's Available!

All Prices Listed Are Cash or Debit Plus Applicable Taxes.
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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Bickle BRP Brake and Clutch levers
Bickle BRP Brake and Clutch levers [message #6895] Sat, 22 November 2014 08:10
Anonymous
Folding Brake and clutch lever set , Black lever with silver adjuster
Billet Aluminum CNC finished for a great feel.
Please specify model of bike and year of bike.
Currently stocking late model Yamaha, Honda,Kawasaki,Suzuki,Triumph
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Currently on sale for $109.00 a set
Used in 2014 by CSBK riders

Free shipping until the end of November
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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
Forum: Motorcycle Site Feeds
 Topic: Pope Benedict XVI Harley-Davidson To Be Sold For Charity At Bonhams Paris Sale
Pope Benedict XVI Harley-Davidson To Be Sold For Charity At Bonhams Paris Sale [message #6923] Wed, 26 November 2014 22:03
Anonymous

From a Bonhams press release:


Pope's Harley Davidson 1,690cc FLSTC 103 Heritage Softail Classic - img1

A Harley-Davidson motorcycle blessed with the signature of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, and later received by Pope Francis, is to be sold for charity at Bonhams 5 February Paris Sale.

The motorcycle is to be offered as part of Bonhams Grand Palais auction, entered at no reserve, with an estimate of €15,000-25,000 (£11,700-19,600).

In a special countdown to Harley-Davidson’s 110th anniversary celebrations, two commemorative motorcycle petrol tanks were presented to Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI.

Pope's Harley Davidson 1,690cc FLSTC 103 Heritage Softail Classic -1These were signed, and returned to the motorcycle legends US headquarters where they were mounted to their respective motorcycles. Of these, one remains in the Harley-Davidson museum in Milwaukee, USA. The remaining motorcycle – the FLSTC 103 Heritage Softail Classic destined for Bonhams 2015 sale – lay waiting for a special ceremony where it would be presented to the Pope in front of tens-of thousands of Harley-Davidson riders at 2013s 110th anniversary celebration.

However, in an unforeseen change to the papacy, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI abdicated in January 2013. Subsequently this saw the Softail Classic presented to the newly inaugurated Pope, his holiness Pope Francis.

“It’s an honour to have been selected to sell this fantastic machine. We expect a lot of interest, and hope to raise some spirited bidding for the very worthy charity selected,” said Ben Walker, International Director for Bonhams Motorcycle Department.

Pope's Harley Davidson 1,690cc FLSTC 103 Heritage Softail Classic -3“In February 2014, Bonhams sold 1,585cc Harley-Davidson Dyna Super Glide signed by His Holiness Pope Francis. Now we’re delighted to offer a motorcycle received by both Pope Francis and Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI; it was present during a pivotal period in the papacy of the Catholic Church, and we expect a lot of interest in it.”

Entered at no reserve, this unique motorcycle will have its auction proceeds donated to Stowarzyszenie Przyjazny Świat Dziecka (Friendly World Association), a Polish volunteer, independent, non-profit organization that offers care and support to children and families in need.

The Harley-Davidson will be sold on 5 February 2015 as part of Bonhams’ Les Grandes Marques du Monde sale at the Grand Palais in Paris.

Pope Benedict XVI Harley-Davidson To Be Sold For Charity At Bonhams Paris Sale appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Polaris Slingshot: MD First Ride (Drive?) – A “Motorcycle” of a Different Sort (Bike Reports) (News)
Polaris Slingshot: MD First Ride (Drive?) – A “Motorcycle” of a Different Sort (Bike Reports) (News) [message #6928] Wed, 26 November 2014 21:44
Anonymous
I’ve tested some three-wheelers before, such as the Piaggio MP3, but never anything quite so car-like as the Polaris Slingshot. Unlike the MP3, the Slingshot does not lean in corners, but remains flat (except for some compression of the suspension on the outside wheel). Looking at the Slingshot, I am reminded much more of a […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Head Shake – Speed Dating
Head Shake – Speed Dating [message #6922] Wed, 26 November 2014 18:00
Anonymous

It seems fitting somehow that with this column falling on the eve of Thanksgiving, and just after my recent wedding anniversary, I give thanks where thanks are due; namely American Honda Motor Company, Inc., and WERA, without which I’m not at all sure these decades of cohabitational bliss would have been possible. Some people find love through online dating services, some find love through their work, or church, or grocery store. And some find their partners thanks to a Honda, assorted race tracks, and questionable judgment.

Life is filled with bad mistakes, moments of less-than-stellar judgment, and long-term relationships require patience. Sometimes it takes months, even years, to find out if both you and your partner possess the traits, and the right chemistry, necessary to survive the trip together. I managed to cram that evaluation process into one early evening. I, after all, possessed all the requisite bad judgment, now it was only incumbent upon me to find out if she possessed the patience, and maybe, with some luck, the chemistry necessary between the two of us to make a go of it.

Melissa handling time sheets from the pre-transponder days, she was the task master with the stop watches.

Melissa handling time sheets from the pre-transponder days. She was the task master with the stop watches.

Early summer evenings in southern Maryland are generally sultry, or, when they are particularly oppressive, just flat out hot and muggy. Having no a/c at the time, I had found only two ways to overcome this steamy clime: either find a dock – they are generally located over a body of water – and walk off the end of it, or take a bike ride. On this particular evening I opted for the latter and thought I’d do some multi-tasking at the same time. There was a young lady I knew who had some familiarity with bikes. She’d ridden mini bikes as a kid and was dating a guy with a little one-lunger Suzuki at the time. I was thinking maybe something with a little more displacement might suit her fancy. So Mr. Displacement set forth to cool off and see what the early evening might bring.

What it brought me was a passenger of the perfect proportions, i.e., small and light enough to not even know she was there, yet clinging to me like a baby possum such that when I leaned left, she leaned left, I go right, she goes right. She kept her feet on the passenger pegs at stops, she was MSF-approved textbook perfect in every regard. I observed the proper new passenger decorum and rode responsibly; no scaring the passenger, no pulling any absurdly stupid death-defying stunts, aspiring in every respect to be the perfect gentleman rider.

She could actually find a good use for ARMCO, something that has eluded me my entire life. I’m more of an Air Fence kinda guy.

She could actually find a good use for ARMCO, something that has eluded me my entire life. I’m more of an Air Fence kinda guy.

Everything was going swimmingly, the sun was setting, the onshore breeze off the Bay was cooling the peninsula, the Honda was punching out its tune from its Kerker without missing a note. It was, in all regards, just motorcycling bliss. And then I passed KC hill down in Ridge, Maryland. The Knights of Columbus hall, or KC hill as it is called locally, used to be an impromptu gathering spot for all number of things, a great many of which had nothing to do with the Knights of Columbus, unless they started sanctioning street races and hadn’t told me.

An inline-Four Kawi had fired up and was moving out, I could hear his open pipe barking. No problem, I’m just out for a relaxing evening ride, cool off, maybe ride down to Point Lookout and catch what remained of the setting sun. I nodded at the Kawi rider as I went by to the flashing red at the intersection. I stopped in a proper fashion, looked both ways like dad taught me, and proceeded with caution south down Route 5. It was about then I was passed by a land-based cruise missile. That Kwacker came by me close with a howl – close enough to suck the badges off my side covers – and passed the car in front of me like he was stapled to the asphalt.

Rockingham heat left her undaunted, she could make any pit area Club Med.

Rockingham heat left her undaunted, she could make any pit area Club Med.

And then something happened.

I did everything I was not supposed to do.

I dropped two gears and pinned it. In a display of grossly inappropriate behavior I completely forgot the cardinal rule that one never scares a new motorcycle passenger, exceeds posted speed limits, and crosses double-yellow lines. Truth be told, I completely forgot she was back there, well, until the front wheel lofted on an upshift. By then it was too late. I had already made a complete ass out of myself (but I did get by the Kawi) and I was moving with considerable dispatch in a fashion that J.E.B. Stuart could only dream of in his day toward the old Confederate Civil War monument down at Point Lookout. I had clear sightlines, it was a beautiful evening, there wasn’t a car to be seen and we were flying. It was one sweeping right hander and then another left and we were as good as there. The Kawi was gone. So probably were any hopes I had with this young lady. I knew I was screwed, I knew she would yell at me when we stopped, I knew I had blown my chance to do it the right way. I might as well enjoy the ride.

The bikes got faster, so did I some days, yet she remained the same. Enthusiastic, supportive, and always there.

The bikes got faster, so did I some days, yet she remained the same. Enthusiastic, supportive, and always there.

The asphalt goes from good to lumpy down around Point Lookout, so I throttled it back to operational lumpy speeds and we proceeded down to the causeway. It’s a beautiful view there when the sun is setting, the Chesapeake Bay on one side, Cornfield Harbor on the other, and almost always a constant breeze. People preparing to go night fishing were setting up at one end, I idled to a stop at the other. It was time to face the music. I shut the bike down and let her climb off, put the side stand down, and flipped open my visor as she pulled my old Bell off her head. Might as well get this over with, I thought. Just as I suspected, before I could get a word out of my mouth she spoke.

“How fast were we going!” she exclaimed shaking her hair out and smiling.

Uhhh, hold on what? How fast, uh, well, pretty fast, faster than we should have. I’m really sorry about that, I shouldn’t have done that.

“That was GREAT,” she burst out, still all smiles.

… and the bikes got slower, and so did I, some days. Yet despite the heat, cold, injuries, or expensive UPS shipments, she remained as enthusiastic as that first ride.

… and the bikes got slower, and so did I, some days. Yet despite the heat, cold, injuries, or expensive UPS shipments, she remained as enthusiastic as that first ride.

Now I had to think, what in the world do I have here? This unusual creature, far from berating me for my deplorable behavior, my boorish motorcycling etiquette, and impetuous ways, seemed to have enjoyed that. From all outward appearances, nothing had gone wrong.

I didn’t quite know what to do with that. Thirty years later I still don’t know. But having watched the decades pass, and having watched her help me and many others at tracks, and in life, throughout a good portion of the United States from the 1980s to present day, I do know a couple things. I am thankful. And I am very lucky. On this Thanksgiving eve, I hope all of you are lucky as well, or a good surprise is headed your way – that would not be a surprise to me at all. It sometimes seems the least probable scenarios yield the greatest returns. Ride hard, look where you want to go, and please, may you and yours enjoy a safe and happy holiday.

Head Shake – Speed Dating appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: 2014 Motorcycle.com Holiday Gift Guide
2014 Motorcycle.com Holiday Gift Guide [message #6921] Wed, 26 November 2014 16:34
Anonymous

Behold the 50 days of Christmas! Five lists comprised of 10 gifts per, we’ve provided you with a selection of moto-specific gifts to fit every level of expenditure for all kinds of riders. Or, maybe they’re not gifts for others but ideas of what to buy for yourself with all those X-mas greenbacks you’re about to receive in a month’s time. Whatever the case, there’s a lot to look through here, but if that’s not enough, maybe check out some gift guides from Christmases past: 2013 Holiday Gift Guide, 2012 Holiday Gift Guide.

Happy shopping! Ho ho ho!


Motorcycle Gift Guides

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-0-50

Top Ten Holiday Gifts Under $50

Ten stocking-stuffers costing less than $50 for the motorcycle-lover in your life.

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-50-100

Top Ten Holiday Gifts Between $50-$100

This time our Top Ten List moves up to items between $50 and $100 with practical gift ideas that won’t break the bank.

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-100-250

Top 10 Holiday Gifts Between $100-$250

If you’re not a scrooge and can afford to splurge, here is a diverse line-up of possible moto-gifts priced between $100 and $250.

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-250-500

Top 10 Holiday Gifts Between $250-$500

For those of you with relatively deep pockets, a giving attitude, and motorcycle-riding friends you really like, may we suggest a few gift items ranging from $250 to $500.

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-500

Top Ten Holiday Gifts Over $500

For those who are just rolling in cash and are willing to spend it on motorcycle-themed gifts … please add your humble Motorcycle.com editors to your gift-giving list while you peruse the our list of gift ideas over $500.

2014 Motorcycle.com Holiday Gift Guide appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $500 And Up
MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $500 And Up [message #6920] Wed, 26 November 2014 15:30
Anonymous

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-500

You never know who’s swimming naked till the tide goes out, says Oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffett. And you never know whose pockets are really deep until they lay a swell gift on you like one of the following. We at MO of course hate to encourage such crass commercialism during a time that’s really all about human and spiritual connections, but it’s basically what we get paid to do. And you can be certain that if motorcycles had existed in 0 AD, these are the gifts people would’ve bestowed instead of frankincense and myrrh and dreidels and whatever.

MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $500 And Up appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $250 $500
MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $250 $500 [message #6919] Wed, 26 November 2014 15:30
Anonymous

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-250-500

For those of you with relatively deep pockets, a giving attitude, and motorcycle-riding friends you really like, may we suggest a few gift items ranging from $250 to $500. However, if you’re on the fence about spending this kind of dough for a holiday gift, rest assured, if any one of the MO staff were to receive one of these, we would be extremely grateful. Odds are, your benefactor would be as well. And isn’t that the point of gift giving? The 10 items below cover a wide swath of riders, both genders, and even the little ones.

MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $250 – $500 appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $100 $250
MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $100 $250 [message #6918] Wed, 26 November 2014 15:30
Anonymous

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-100-250

Spending $100 to $250 on a loved one for Christmas says you really care about them without breaking the bank. If you’ve a brother as cheap as mine, you’d be looking at the $0 to $50 Gift Guide, but if you’re not a scrooge and have only one motorcyclist on your gift list, you can probably afford to splurge. From a Bluetooth communication system to custom hose kits, as well as something for the sport rider to the cruiser pilot, this list spans a diverse line-up of possible moto-gifts. But, if you can’t find something here be sure to check what’s listed in our other 2014 Gift Guides.

MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $100 – $250 appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $50 $100
MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $50 $100 [message #6917] Wed, 26 November 2014 15:30
Anonymous

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-50-100

While the MO Holiday Gift categories range in price from cheap to astronomical, the $50-$100 range falls into the practical spectrum. Here, you can find some gift ideas that the rider in your life can actually use while not breaking your budget. Although we don’t want to make your gifts the equivalent of comfortable shoes, we still managed to include some footwear. Still, we hope that you’ll see the practicality in (almost) every choice.

MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $50 – $100 appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $0 $50
MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $0 $50 [message #6916] Wed, 26 November 2014 15:30
Anonymous

2014-MO-Holiday-Gift-Guide-0-50

It’s the thought that counts, isn’t it? We motorcyclists are a simple lot for the most part, and it doesn’t take a load of cash to please us. Try on these 10 things for size.

MO Holiday Gift Guide 2014: Top 10 $0 – $50 appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Suzuki recall
Suzuki recall [message #6927] Wed, 26 November 2014 09:19
Anonymous

Gixxer 750, 1000 from certain years could use upgraded drive chain adjuster.

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 Topic: CMG Slant: On the demise of nudity
CMG Slant: On the demise of nudity [message #6926] Wed, 26 November 2014 08:50
Anonymous

Remember when naked bikes used to be naked?

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 Topic: Michelin now producing airless tire
Michelin now producing airless tire [message #6925] Wed, 26 November 2014 08:23
Anonymous

The Tweel is being built in South Carolina, but technology hasn't arrived to motorcycling scene yet.

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 Topic: Europe gets V-Strom 1000 Desert Edition
Europe gets V-Strom 1000 Desert Edition [message #6924] Wed, 26 November 2014 07:25
Anonymous

No word on whether Adventure variant will come to Canada.

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 Topic: Interview: Solo World Traveler and Philanthropist Anna Grechishkina
Interview: Solo World Traveler and Philanthropist Anna Grechishkina [message #6910] Tue, 25 November 2014 21:30
Anonymous

Most people who fantasize about traveling the globe on a motorcycle think of the adventure they will encounter and the people they will meet. Anna Grechishkina started from those thoughts and carried them to include charitable works and inspiring others to pursue their dreams. For the past 15 months, Anna has ridden her KTM Adventure 1190 halfway around the globe from her Ukrainian home, spreading a simple message: Follow your dreams and good things will happen.

Anna on Route 66

From torrential rain to extreme heat, Anna encountered some of her most difficult weather conditions in Arizona.

Although we missed Grechishkina when she passed through California on her bike earlier in the year, we recently had an opportunity to spend some time with her while she was visiting for an event related to her journey. To say that she is charming is an understatement. This self-proclaimed introvert lights up when she’s describing travel, motorcycling and, above all, inspiring others to go after their dreams. While she clearly loves motorcycle travel, her conversation always turns to working with others.

Anna in Malaysia

On the road in Malaysia.

MO: What started this dream to ride around the world?

AG: Well, I just love to travel on the bike. I’ve been doing this for nine years before the world trip. When I came back from [my second trip to] India, I decided, “Why not make something global?” At first it was like a crazy idea, and I was scared of it: “No, I can’t do that. It’s so dangerous and so difficult. It’s not just one month’s travel – a few weeks.”

Then this idea just started to come back to me again and again. I thought that maybe it’s a sort of sign that I have to, at least, try to do something about it. I consulted a few of my close friends, and I thought that they would try to talk me out of it. Surprisingly, they supported me and said that it was a logical continuation of [my] motorcycle career. Because I’d been to Eastern Europe, to Asia, by that time, India, the Middle East, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon before…

Anna on the rim of the Grand Canyon

Now that her North American tour is completed, Anna moves on to Central America.

MO: You’ve done a lot in nine years.

AG: Yeah, I really enjoy traveling on the motorcycle. So, I started to plan my trip. It took me one year, three months. I had to find the bike that was appropriate for the trip. Before that, I was riding a Kawasaki Vulcan 900. I loved this bike. On this bike, I traveled everywhere. I understood that for a world trip, it was maybe not the best bike. So, I had a lot of discussions with motorcycle dealerships. I was thinking about Japanese bike at first, a Kawasaki or Suzuki or whatever. Everybody seemed to be interested, but nobody wanted contribute somehow. Actually, nobody was sure that I would start because so many people claim that they are going to go somewhere, a world trip or just a long distance ride, but they never do.

Then I got a phone call from KTM Ukraine, they said, “We heard about your project.”

Anna with kids in Malaysia

Anna’s message to all the children she meets: Follow your dreams; you never know where they’ll take you.

MO: They approached you?

AG: I mean Ukrainian office, not Austrian. In Ukraine, it’s a very small office. They said, “If you are interested in KTM, we can try to approach the Austrian office. Maybe we can do something.” I hadn’t thought about KTM at all, but I didn’t have another choice. I said, “OK, we can try it.” That’s how we started to talk to KTM Austria, and it took around six months. Finally, we convinced them. They said, “OK, we give you the motorcycle and the gear, but that’s it. All the rest is your responsibility.”

They gave me the choice of the KTM Adventure 990 or 1190, and at first, I was thinking about 990 because everybody knows about this bike. You know what to expect. Then I thought that maybe it’s better to take 1190 because it’s a new bike and maybe I’ll get more attention from the international community. Also, it turned out that the 1190 is not that tall, it’s not that heavy. So, I decided to take the 1190. I saw the bike after a few months, in a physical form, and I was very scared because I didn’t have any experience of riding a bike like this.

Anna and her bike

The global trip required Anna to switch from a Vulcan 900 to a KTM Adventure 1190. It looks like they’ve bonded with each other.

MO: Well, it’s a huge change in riding position from a Vulcan 900.

AG: I was so horrified, but the decision was made, already. Still, I didn’t have any money to start the trip. Actually, when I started the trip, I only had $1000 in my pocket. I had a few sponsors. They contributed some money, but I spent it for the preparation. So, I couldn’t cancel the trip because I had the bike, and everybody in the biker’s community knew I was going to start. So, if I had canceled at that time, my reputation would be gone forever. I was sure about that, and I wouldn’t have any other chance to do this because people would remember my failure the first time.

So, I decided that if it was meant to be, it would be. Somehow, I will figure out what to do. Somehow, I will find sources of funds.

I started the trip. I was very nervous. One week before the start, I couldn’t sleep at night and lost 10 kilos (22 lbs). It was terrible. I’m really happy that I didn’t fail, and I decided to take this first step. Now, I always tell that the most difficult thing is to make the first step. After that, it somehow starts to get more and more smooth.

Anna at Alice's Restaurant

Wherever Anna travels, she’s embraced by the motorcycling community.

MO: Is this where your I Have a Dream foundation got created? (Note to readers: Since Anna is Ukrainian, this name is not related to the Martin Luther King speech of the same name that resonates so strongly in American minds.)

AG: “I Have a Dream,” initially, it was the name of the [around the world] project – and the tattoo [on my arm] which I made a few years before.

I wanted to make this trip not only for myself – and not only about my dream… Actually, before this world trip, I created sort of a biker’s community, charity activities and charity events. What we did was we visited orphanages, hospitals, and old folks’ homes on our motorcycles. Our main goal was not to bring some financial material but to bring ourselves and our hearts and just spend time with people, especially with kids. Our idea was to not make it once a year or some kind of New Year’s celebration or Easter but to do it regularly to let them realize that there are some people in this world who care and who want to be their friends. In a few years, we made so many connections with these kids, and they approached us with questions, and they tried to ask for advice about schools, about their personal lives.

Anna tattoo

When naming her adventure, Anna looked no further than her right forearm.

I wanted to do something like that during this world trip. What I’m doing, right now, I’m trying to visit schools in all the countries that I visit. Some orphanages, if they exist, and some hospitals. Just to give talks about dreams or adventures about other countries. My story that I had this dream to see the world, and though it was so difficult… but at least I started.

What I’ve tried to tell them is that, look even if you don’t have parents, even if you are in so difficult circumstances, if you have a passion, if you have a dream, you can achieve it. Everything is in your hands. That’s what “I Have a Dream” is about.

Anna and kids

It’s all about the kids.

MO: What do you think prompted you to be so involved in the schools and orphanages? Is that something you’ve been interested in your whole life?

AG: Maybe not my whole life, but I lost my parents, my mom when I was 16. My father died just a few years ago. That influenced me a lot, and I started to think about how to help other people to overcome their struggles. I tried to bring some difference into this world. It made me feel somehow better for myself, once I started to do that. So, my first visits in Ukraine, I organized a group of my friends, and we went to old folk’s home and brought them sweets and fruit and just spent time with them, talking to them. They were crying because nobody ever came to them. We wanted to do that again and again.

I just realized that I enjoy it so much when I can bring some difference in somebody else’s life – even if I just smiled, I saw some kind of light in their eyes. That is awesome. It helps you to become a better person.

Right now, I want to encourage as many people as possible to follow their dreams, because I understand how awesome it is to live your dream. I’m 15 months on the road, so you think I can get used to it already. But no. Every morning I wake up with the thought of “Oh my goodness, I’m on a world trip on my bike. I’m living my dream.” So, I tell myself even if I encourage only one person to follow their dream, my mission would be completed. I would be absolutely satisfied and happy.

112514-anna-grechishkina-Malaysia_3

MO: Shifting gears a little, what initially attracted you to motorcycling?

AG: This is the question that I would like to know the answer. It happened in 2005, and before that time, I didn’t have any friends or relatives who were motorcyclists. I was never even riding as a passenger on a motorcycle. I didn’t know how it feels. Just, one day, one morning, this crazy idea came into my mind that I wanted to learn how to ride a motorcycle. I didn’t know who to approach, who to ask questions, and I just went to the riding school to get my license and to learn how to ride. It took me a few months. So, that’s when I bought my first motorcycle, a Kawasaki Eliminator 125.

Since that time, all my life changed. Of course, I got new friends. I started to travel, first around Ukraine and then a little bit outside to Russia, Belarus, Moldova, then Eastern Europe, Turkey, Bulgaria, and into Greece, also. Then into Georgia. Then the Middle East: Syria, Jordan, Lebanon. Then India. That’s how it started, and that’s how it continues. And I was involved in the charity community. Since then, my life absolutely changed.

112514-anna-grechishkina-SAM_1133

Now, I think that maybe it was meant to be, sort of destiny. I don’t know. I feel that I’m more fulfilled, now. I can do something that I like, and I can make a difference. I can help people – even with the motorcycle. To use it for the benefit of people.

MO: What’s your favorite part of traveling alone?

AG: I’m actually an introvert by nature, and I need time to recharge myself. Most of the time, I’m always with people – because of meetings or because I stay with local people. Sometimes, I arrive at places very tired. Because of the ride, because of the weather, and then I meet people. Of course they want to know about my ride, my adventure, and I have to be nice and smile because they offer me accommodation. They’re really nice people. I like to mix with them, but it takes me a lot of energy. Then the next day I have to ride, again, or go sightseeing. That also takes quite a lot of energy. So, when I’m riding alone, this is my time for myself. It’s the time that I can actually have some rest. Even when I’m riding, even when I’m struggling with the weather or the bike, I have some rest mentally.

Anna and kids

See what dreaming big will get you?

Another thing, when you’re traveling alone, you’re more exposed. People come to you easily. They start to ask you questions, and you have to go out of your comfort zone to mix with people. You don’t have anybody else. That’s what I like.

MO: What is your remaining route?

AG: After Texas, I pick up my bike and I go to Mexico and the other Central American countries. From there, South America, the west coast: Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina and Brazil. From Brazil, I go to South Africa, and I take the east coast of Africa and end up in Egypt. From Egypt, Europe. So, I think that I’ll be on the road two and a half years, altogether. So, probably, I’m exactly halfway through.

112514-anna-grechishkina-Malaysia_6 

Interview: Solo World Traveler and Philanthropist Anna Grechishkina appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: South Bay Triumph/Triumph Performance USA Feature
South Bay Triumph/Triumph Performance USA Feature [message #6909] Tue, 25 November 2014 18:24
Anonymous

Located on SoCal’s famous Pacific Coast Highway, South Bay Triumph specializes in high-performance parts, services and complete bike builds via their aftermarket division known as Triumph Performance USA. Both enterprises housed under one roof are overseen by Matt Capri, with some 40 years in the industry both in sales, technical development and competition, having won at variety of race venues as well as established speed records on Triumphs, Nortons and BMWs.

SBT now offers a smorgasbord of go-fast parts, and its showroom displays a tasty menu of the latest Triumphs, Royal Enfields and the new snortin’ Norton. And if you’re looking for something way beyond stock, they can build you an SBT special. Case in point, the brace of hi-po Triumphs seen here.

2013 Bonneville Performance Street Tracker Review

My first encounter with Matt Capri took place in 1982 when he set part of Fullerton, CA on fire … at least that’s the way it seemed by the sound of all the smoke alarms that went screaming in the surrounding buildings once he lit up the back tire of his Luftmeister turbocharged BMW that I had gone to photograph for a magazine. During the ’80s, riding both standard and turbo-ed Beemers, Matt had already established several speed records.You could say Matt and his tire-melting bike got my full attention.

Matt Capri and his personal bike, the Mirage RT, first built in 2005.

Matt Capri and his personal bike, the Mirage RT, first built in 2005.

Back in 1964 and living in New York, Matt threw a leg over his first new ride, a  650cc BSA A10 Super Rocket. He didn’t get off it until he had ridden it to Mexico City and accumulated race wins across the country in four different classes, including drag racing.

Capri then transitioned to BMWs and built racing engines that helped them win the 1976 AMA Superbike championship. He then went on to found the Luftmeister brand and established seven land-speed records and joined the 200-mph Club aboard a BMW K100 turbo.

Moving onto Triumphs, Capri crossed the 200-mph mark again with a Daytona 1200. He also set the Triumph Stock Production record in 1998 with a Daytona 955, recording a 174-mph run. So, Matt’s been dialing in Brit bikes for a while, with his tuning talents focused on the new generation of Triumphs since opening his dealership in 1995. Today, I was standing in his SBT digs surrounded by several Triumphs treated to a serious amount of upgrading.

SBT’s 998cc Thruxton 150+ mph Record Breaker seen with “street” high-pipe. It wore a different exhaust for the Bonneville  runs.

SBT’s 998cc Thruxton 150+ mph Record Breaker seen with “street” high-pipe. It wore a different exhaust for the Bonneville runs.

The red and white 2007 Triumph Thruxton pumped up with a 988cc stroker motor that, when flogged over the Utah salt flats at Bonneville, recorded 152.723 mph when ridden by British motojournalist Alan Cathcart. It went on to scorch FIM World Records at Bonneville in 2009.

Triumph 1147 Mirage RT

Triumph 1147 Mirage RT

The blue and white bike is tagged the Mirage RT, named for the El Mirage Dry Lake outside L.A., the traditional hot spot for SoCal land speed racing. The engine displaces 1147cc pumping a pair of 11.5:1 pistons fed by Keihin 41mm carbs that combine to produce 105 rear-wheel ponies. The component list includes a 50mm inverted fork, a rear Penske monoshock, Brembo anchors, and the motor tucked into chromoly 4130 chassis for a total fat-free weight of just 380 flickable pounds.

The Tracker model is available by custom order. It uses Carrozzeria forged-aluminum wheels, a 41mm KYB fork and twin Ohlins shocks.

The Tracker model is available by custom order. It uses Carrozzeria forged-aluminum wheels, a 41mm KYB fork and twin Ohlins shocks.

SBT’s “Tracker” boasts an orange-painted chromoly frame of just 32 lbs. stuffed with a hi-po’d Bonneville motor opened up from 790 to 988cc and plugged with 11.5:1 Arias pistons. In total, he bike is said to tip the scales at only 351 lbs. The racer makes 106 rear-wheel horsepower and 80 lb-ft of torque, a huge upgrade over the stock bike’s 61 hp and 47 lb-ft of torque. It boasts a welded stroker crank, hi-lift cams, ported heads, etc., so the power-to-weight ratio is more than stimulating. Street-version “Trackers” are available starting at a base price of $30k.

In addition to the SBT/Triumph Performance USA line of parts, they also build their own “crate motors,” with at least 40 of their 1087cc engines now powering bikes around the world.  Set up for the street and running pump gas, the engines range in displacement from 865cc, a big-bore 904cc, a 988 (via stroker crank), 994cc big cylinder, and the 1087cc (also with stroker crank) monster. To make their power and maintain durability, only the best components are used, and thus the pricing. They range from $969 for the hot-rodded 865cc version to $11,000 for the burly 1087cc stroker. What you do with the motor is then up to you.

Matt Capri has a long history of making motorcycles go fast.

Matt Capri has a long history of making motorcycles go fast.

More of the SBT story is told in the photos and captions below. Further info can be found at SBT’s website.

SBT’s crewmember Teren takes the Triumph Bonneville record breaker through the ocean-side twisties.

SBT’s crewmember Teren takes the Triumph Bonneville record breaker through the ocean-side twisties.

Matt and Bonneville Record Maker take a scenic pit stop.

Matt and Bonneville Record Maker take a scenic pit stop.

While it might at first glance be mistaken for a “stocker,” a twist of the throttle would dissolve all such delusions.

While it might at first glance be mistaken for a “stocker,” a twist of the throttle would dissolve all such delusions.

Solo “tach attack” keeps everything neat and uncluttered.

Solo “tach attack” keeps everything neat and uncluttered.

Mirage RT rearsets are available from SBT’s parts list.

Mirage RT rearsets are available from SBT’s parts list.

Contrasting finish treatments polish off the classy cosmetics.

Contrasting finish treatments polish off the classy cosmetics.

Certification chronicling five land-speed records at Bonneville Salt Flats during 2009 BUB Speed Trials. SBT/ Team South Bay Triumph/Norton’s turbocharged Thruxton set FIM and AMA records, the latter with a best run of 171.65 mph.

Certification chronicling five land-speed records at Bonneville Salt Flats during 2009 BUB Speed Trials. SBT/ Team South Bay Triumph/Norton’s turbocharged Thruxton set FIM and AMA records, the latter with a best run of 171.65 mph.

“Let’s head that away …”

“Let’s head that away …”

Tracker’s gas tank carries 2.7 gallons. Twin 41mm Keihin FCR flat-slides replace the stock 36mm carbs.

Tracker’s gas tank carries 2.7 gallons. Twin 41mm Keihin FCR flat-slides replace the stock 36mm carbs.

Tracker’s minimalism treatment extends to instrumentation via a solo British-made Acewell digital tach.

Tracker’s minimalism treatment extends to instrumentation via a solo British-made Acewell digital tach.

A pair of Ohlins shocks are worth their weight in golden handling. Custom megaphones are perfect “trumpets” for the SBT Tracker.

A pair of Ohlins shocks are worth their weight in golden handling. Custom megaphones are perfect “trumpets” for the SBT Tracker.

Looking like solid muscle, SBT’s dramatically painted 1700cc Triumph Thunderbird-based Bonneville Salt Flats record challenger produces 130 hp. At its last run, it was just 4 mph shy of the world record and preparing to go for it again.

Looking like solid muscle, SBT’s dramatically painted 1700cc Triumph Thunderbird-based Bonneville Salt Flats record challenger produces 130 hp. At its last run, it was just 4 mph shy of the world record and preparing to go for it again.

Is that “Follow the Yellow Brick Curvy Road” to a world record?

Is that “Follow the Yellow Brick Curvy Road” to a world record?

A curvy road, a dialed-in Triumph and golden SoCal sunlight. What more do you need?

A curvy road, a dialed-in Triumph and golden SoCal sunlight. What more do you need?

 

South Bay Triumph/Triumph Performance USA Feature appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Honda Produces 300 Millionth Motorcycle
Honda Produces 300 Millionth Motorcycle [message #6908] Tue, 25 November 2014 11:51
Anonymous

Honda has reached an impressive landmark, producing the 300 millionth motorcycle in the company’s 66-year history. The milestone motorcycle, a Gold Wing, was completed in September at Honda’s primary motorcycle factory in Kumamoto, Japan.

The 1832cc flat-six Gold Wing is quite a departure from Honda’s first motorcycle, the 1949 Dream Type-D and its 98cc Single, but the two bike share a common heritage. Right from the start, Honda’s first motorcycle was unique with its semi-automatic clutch system and a maroon paint scheme in a world full of black motorcycles.

The Honda Super Cub is the world's most produced motorcycle, with 87 million units made as of March 2014. Remarkably, the Super Cub represents 29% of all Honda motorcycles ever produced.

The Honda Super Cub is the world’s most produced motorcycle, with 87 million units made as of March 2014. Remarkably, the Super Cub represents 29% of all Honda motorcycles ever produced.

Honda became the world’s largest motorcycle manufacturer in 1959, the same year it entered the U.S. market. Today, the company has 33 motorcycle production facilities in 22 different countries worldwide.

“Thanks to support from our customers and all of the people involved in development, production and sales, Honda was able to reach the 300 million-unit milestone,” says Takanobu Ito, president and chief executive officer of Honda Motor Co. “We will continue to provide products that will please our customers in each country and region in the world.”

112514-honda-300-million-infographic

[Source: Honda]

Honda Produces 300 Millionth Motorcycle appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Torres to World Superbike: Rumour
Torres to World Superbike: Rumour [message #6915] Tue, 25 November 2014 08:54
Anonymous

Moto2 ace might be working with Kawasaki next year.

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 Topic: Yamaha recall
Yamaha recall [message #6914] Tue, 25 November 2014 08:45
Anonymous

Some FZ-07s need recall attention.

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 Topic: DrivingTest.ca adds motorcycle information
DrivingTest.ca adds motorcycle information [message #6913] Tue, 25 November 2014 08:38
Anonymous

Practice up for your motorcycle licence.

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 Topic: Kawasaki H2, H2R: Not for showrooms
Kawasaki H2, H2R: Not for showrooms [message #6912] Tue, 25 November 2014 08:26
Anonymous

Kawasaki wants you to make an up-front deposit if you are going to buy their new superbike.

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 Topic: Honda reaches 300 million motorcycle mark
Honda reaches 300 million motorcycle mark [message #6911] Tue, 25 November 2014 06:58
Anonymous

Big Red is really, really big.

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 Topic: Tomfoolery – Shoutin’ Out
Tomfoolery – Shoutin’ Out [message #6901] Mon, 24 November 2014 21:03
Anonymous

On weekdays, when the canyons are devoid of weekend road warriors, our bike testing, photo and video shoots take place. Because we maintain the same weekly, nine-to-five grind as most worker bee motorcyclists, rarely do we cross paths with the average enthusiast out for a Sunday ride.

Occasionally, though, a motorcyclist playing hookey from work will give us the hairy eyeball, wander toward the collection of bikes we’re testing, then say something like, “How come you guys look familiar?” It’s a rare occurrence, but one we look forward to because they’re always pleasant interactions, oftentimes reaffirming what we do isn’t completely fruitless.

The other day, while grubbing at one of our favorite mountain locale restaurants (Crystal Lake Cafe) Garrett Hardy arrived on his GSX-R750 with his riding buddy aboard a modified Star Bolt. Confirming who we were, then posing for the obligatory group photo, Garrett went on to tell us that he based his motorcycle purchase on our recommendation.

Apparently, in a past shootout involving the GSX-R and a more expensive opponent, we gave him the notion that purchasing the lesser expensive Gixxer and spending the money saved on riding gear and trackdays was the better way to go. A phrase we’ve repeated in similar shootouts.

Having now navigated numerous tracks and crashing a few times, Garrett’s readying to retire the Gixxer to trackday-specific duty, and pick up new an S1000RR as his street ride. Another decision influenced by our honest (his word) opinions.

From left: Evans Brasfield, Randy Emata, Thai Long Lee, Kevin Duke, Tom Roderick, Troy Siahaan

From left: Evans Brasfield, Randy Emata, Thai Long Ly, Kevin Duke, Tom Roderick, Troy Siahaan

Thai Long Ly and friend “Nut Smuggler” rode up the day last year when we were filming our Four-Thirds Shootout. We bumped into him again months later (Thai’s a bohemian musician who keeps abnormal hours, freeing weekdays for time spent aboard his Triumph Daytona 675). Since then a bromance blossomed between him and our own Asian correspondent, Troy Siahaan. They go on long rides together, and Troy even invited him along to participate in one our shootouts (see Thai’s motojournalist debut in our 2014 Lightweight Naked Shootout).

The thing Thai, Garrett and anyone else who meets us wants to know is how did we score this job of riding motorcycles for money? To which we normally reply, dumb luck and good timing. However, luck is when preparation meets opportunity, right?

I doubt Thai would want to give up his rock-n-roll lifestyle, but young, Padawan Garrett probably doesn’t want to make a parts counter position at Bert’s Mega Mall his career choice. To him I say, start preparing. At his age I was doing about the same thing, and, well, look at me now.

thanksgivingBut, I’m digressing. What I’m meaning to say is that Thai and Garrett probably didn’t know it at the time, but their exuberance and outwardly spoken words of appreciation meant a lot to all of us MO editors. We exert so much energy resisting the urge to reply to crazy Youtube commenters accusing us of having sold out to one OEM or another, reading cue cards, etc., it truly is an inspirational breath of fresh air on the rare occasion we meet a fellow enthusiast who appreciates our work.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving and on behalf of the MO staff, I say thank you to Garrett, Thai and all the past and future friends of MO.

Now, please pass the Turbaconducken.

Tomfoolery – Shoutin’ Out appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Riding Factory Superbikes with Michael Schumacher
Riding Factory Superbikes with Michael Schumacher [message #6900] Mon, 24 November 2014 15:56
Anonymous

Michael Schumacher, the legendary Formula 1 driver and erstwhile motorcycle racer who suffered a severe head injury in a freak skiing accident nearly a year ago, remains paralyzed and is unable to speak, according to Philippe Streiff, a close friend of the seven-time world champion.

Streiff was interviewed on French radio last week, and he revealed a few details of Schumacher’s latest condition. He says Schumacher is “getting better, but everything is relative,” adding that Schumi is also suffering memory problems.

News about the 45-year-old German ace’s condition has been kept mostly secret since the skiing accident in the French Alps on December 31, 2013 when Schumacher suffered a brain injury, despite wearing a helmet, after his head struck a hidden rock.

Schumacher was placed in an artificial coma while he recovered in hospital. A month later came some good news: doctors had begun awakening Schumacher from his coma. And last April, Schumacher’s spokeswoman Sabine Kehm said the F1 legend was showing moments of consciousness, but precious little new info about his condition has been released. He is currently being cared for at his home on the shores of Lake Geneva where his wife, Corinna, helps care for him.

Streiff, who ironically is a quadriplegic after an F1 crash in 1989, told French radio that Schumacher’s condition is “very difficult. He can’t speak. Like me, he is in a wheelchair paralysed. He has memory problems and speech problems.”

Michael Schumacher’s Official Website

In light of this latest news, we wanted to share a story from one of our contributors, Jim McDermott, who a few years ago had an unforgettable experience riding factory superbikes with Schumacher. Godspeed, Schumi. – Kevin Duke, Editor-in-Chief


Circuit Algarve, Portimao, Portugal, October 2008: My second lap, and thoughts of crashing an Australian’s priceless Italian museum piece started to dissipate. Riding a bit looser, getting harder on the gas, I started to feel almost confident.

And that’s when the most memorable 60 seconds I’ve ever spent on a motorcycle began.

I was in Portugal to test ride the 2008 factory World Superbikes for Superbikeplanet.com the day after the season wrapped up. The series organizers had asked Soup editor Dean Adams to send a fast guy to the first group test for journalists they’d ever done. Why Dean chose me, I’ll never know, as I’m anything but fast. I’ll be eternally grateful to him for picking me. As a longtime WSBK fan, it was nothing less than a dream to sample the factory machines of Honda, Yamaha, Kawasaki and Ducati.

112414-michael-schumacher-bayliss-wsbk

Michael Schumacher greets fellow multiple-world champion Troy Bayliss at the Ducati rider’s last WSBK race at Portimao.

It was a special event on several fronts. Portimao was a brand-new track, the World Superbikes series racing there for the very first time. Ducati hero Troy Bayliss, who had already wrapped up the 2008 Championship, was hanging up his leathers after this round. Bayliss’ 1098 F08 featured a special one-off livery, with elements of the Australian flag. Bayliss rode out like a true champion, winning both races on Sunday to cap off a truly emotional weekend.

Those invited to the test were instructed to turn up at the circuit at 8am for a briefing, followed by riding. Portimao is on the south coast of Portugal, and on that October morning, it was cold, every exhalation leaving a cloud in the air. About a dozen journalists showed up, and while huffing double espressos, we were told: 1) We’d get two laps on a scooter to “familiarize ourselves” with the Algarve Circuit, followed by 3-5 laps on each World Superbike. 2) We’d be required to sign waivers relieving everyone involved if we seriously injured ourselves. 3) If we did crash, the team of the bike we binned would likely ensure we were seriously injured. This was said in jest … I think.

112414-michael-schumacher-wsbk-test-troy-corser-yamaha-r1-2

Fast on two wheels or four, Michael Schumacher rides Troy Corser’s R1 superbike.

There was one last announcement, and it was incredible: Legendary F1 racer Michael Schumacher would be riding with us. The seven-time Formula 1 champion had become obsessed with racing motorcycles since his retirement in 2006, and he was at Portimao to ride the Yamaha and Ducati WSBK bikes. So, on this Monday in October, the day after Bayliss’ last race, we’d all be riding his motorcycle, on a new track, alongside one of the greatest F1 drivers of all time.

The Ducati guys handed me Bayliss’ 1098 F08 in his “as raced” preparation; the suspension settings, tire compound, mapping, and gear ratio settings he had used to ride the Ducati to victory in both races on Sunday, the last of his World Superbike racing career. They set the traction and anti-wheelie control quite a bit higher than what Bayliss normally used. Ducati were quite generous, letting journalists ride this piece of history before it was tucked away, but they weren’t stupid.

As eager as I was to ride Bayliss’ bike, I had serious concerns. I’d never ridden a bike with slicks, or with a reverse/race-pattern gearbox. Acclimating to both, while riding a priceless factory racebike around a racetrack I’d never seen before, was intimidating to say the least. And the other guys, many of whom were “name” European ex-racers, were absolutely flogging the bikes. I just hoped I could ride fast enough to keep heat in the slicks and not kill the gearbox or crash. Luckily, between the scooter laps and a session on another factory machine that morning, I had a good idea which way the track went.

Bayliss’ 1098 F08 did not disappoint. Riding it was like glimpsing an ideal future and wishing you could stay there. Relative to a street Ducati Superbike, I had expected the factory machine to be a beast. Surprisingly, it felt incredibly refined: superlative suspension, fueling, braking, and stunning speed, delivered in a wholly usable, unintimidating manner. The connection between the bike and the rider was almost spiritual in nature. Unlike the other factory bikes I rode that day, the 1098 F08 seemed to want to help me be the best I could be.

So on that second lap, caught up in the rapture, I braked deep into the hairpin by the VIP Tower, looking uphill, over my shoulder. After a short run through a left-hand kink, with Turn 8 ahead, I clicked down (up) two gears, the revs going high under engine braking, aural nirvana. Lightly dragging the front anchors as I approached my turn-in point, I thought, “Wow, I can’t believe how late I can leave the braking on this bike.” Just then, I heard an exhaust note, violently shredding the air slightly behind and to the right of me. There was little room between me and the curbing, and we were almost at the corner. I was sure I was about to be hit, or watch the rider go into the gravel trap. “Who can this damned fool be,” I thought, “This isn’t a race!”

112414-michael-schumacher-wsbk-test-noriyuki-haga-yamaha-r1-1

Sparks fly as Michael Schumacher drags a knee on Noriyuki Haga’s factory Yamaha R1 superbike.

In my peripheral vision, Michael Schumacher shot into view, riding Noriyuki Haga’s YZF-R1, hard on the gas. As he charged into the corner, his eyes loomed large behind the visor, fixed on his turn-in point, far beyond where mortals like me would peer. He downshifted, the dual exhausts spitting long tongues of unburnt fuel from the Yamaha’s cauldron heart. And then, at an apex that seemed so delayed he’d need a hinged bike to complete it, Schumacher shot through the corner. I turned in a moment later, albeit much wider, and was already several bike lengths behind the R1.

My memories of the next 45 seconds or so are very ABC’s Wide World Of Sports. The colors saturated, images grainy in my mind. I thought of all the Formula 1 drivers who had been passed that close by Michael Schumacher over the years. He was fast on a bike, no question, riding with total commitment, but there was something else happening. Close to him at speed, I felt the history he carried, his incredible record of victories, an aura which had a stunning effect. For a few heartbeats I forgot where I was, and just watched him go.

I stayed within reach of Schumi for a few more corners, the 1098’s booming V-Twin counterpointing the shrill revs of the R1, and I mimicked his movements as best I could. Countless others had followed Schumacher to gain a tenth here and there, why not me? But I couldn’t stick with him. He pulled on me steadily, and by the time we came down the hill to the front straight, he was gone. Speeding past the empty grandstands on Bayliss’ Ducati, I knew that those 60 seconds were the best I had ever spent on a motorcycle, and likely ever would.

Michael Schumacher (#77) raced in select rounds of the 2008 German Superbike Championship, riding a Honda CBR1000RR for Holzhauer Racing.

It was incredibly sad to hear of Schumacher’s grave injuries in December, 2013, five short years after I encountered him. It seemed impossible that a tenacious legend such as he would be stopped in his tracks whilst on a ski vacation with his family, after living a lifetime on the edge of danger.

As I grow older, a few magic rides stand tall in my memory, when the road seemed mine alone, a rusted glow illuminating every perfect corner. Rides where I thought, “It cannot get any better than this.” But none were more magic than those 60 seconds, riding that Ducati alongside Michael Schumacher.

Original Story on Soup: http://www.superbikeplanet.com/2008/Nov/081110-ola1.htm

Riding Factory Superbikes with Michael Schumacher appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: MotoAmerica Revs Up for Launch: New Wayne Rainey Video (News)
MotoAmerica Revs Up for Launch: New Wayne Rainey Video (News) [message #6906] Mon, 24 November 2014 14:45
Anonymous
We abandoned coverage of U.S. road racing several years ago when, in our opinion, it began to be managed in a horribly disjointed, unprofessional manner, offering a confusing mish-mash of racing classes. 2015 is a new beginning for American motorcycle road racing. We haven’t talked much about MotoAmerica, but the concepts it brings forward are […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Szoke gets 14th in BMW racing competition
Szoke gets 14th in BMW racing competition [message #6905] Mon, 24 November 2014 09:41
Anonymous

Injuries torpedoed chances in BMW Motorrad Race Trophy.

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 Topic: US racing updates: Flat Track schedule released
US racing updates: Flat Track schedule released [message #6904] Mon, 24 November 2014 09:20
Anonymous

Also, Waine Rainey talks about MotoAmerica's roadracing plans.

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 Topic: Questions and answers: Dan Kruger talks Macau GP
Questions and answers: Dan Kruger talks Macau GP [message #6903] Mon, 24 November 2014 09:01
Anonymous

Canadian racer shares his experiences from his first outing at the treacherous roadrace.

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 Topic: S&S to release new 162-hp motor for drop-in swaps to Harley-Davidsons
S&S to release new 162-hp motor for drop-in swaps to Harley-Davidsons [message #6902] Mon, 24 November 2014 07:30
Anonymous

Got a 2008-and-up MoCo touring bike? Want to shred rubber with reckless abandon? Good news ...

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 Topic: Church Of MO 2004 MV Agusta Brutale S On The Track, Dyno & Street
Church Of MO 2004 MV Agusta Brutale S On The Track, Dyno & Street [message #6897] Sun, 23 November 2014 05:56
Anonymous

If there’s one thing you can count on in the world of motorcycledom, it’s that MV Agustas will always be beautiful. Case in point: the Brutale. In this case, the 750cc inline-Four Brutale S, designed by none other than the great Massimo Tamburini. In this week’s Church of MO feature we go back to 2004, and Sean Alexander’s impressions of the stunningly beautiful 750 Brutale. Sean was still at his fighting weight back then, AMA racing and all, which makes his thoughts about the MV all the more interesting. Does beauty translate into a winning street and track naked? Read on to find out. Also, be sure to check out the five-page photo gallery for a lot more pictures.


2004 MV Agusta Brutale S On The Track, Dyno & Street

By Sean Alexander Oct. 26, 2004

As people stare with mouths agape and unabashed lust in their eyes, there’s no denying the fact that this is one sexy and exotic motorcycle. However, as a “professional motojournalist” – (cough!), it is my job to test these things and tell you about them, without the rose-colored glasses and the dribbling spittle of a rabid motorcycle fanatic. As with most jobs, some days are easier than others.

Today, I’m finding my job to be a little tougher than most. You see, I have to give you the straight poop on one of Massimo Tamburini’s finest pieces of lustworthy moto sculpture. Youdo know Tamburini, don’t you? He’s that guy who co-founded Bimota, helped bring us the original Ducati Desmoquattros and penned the stunning and oft-imitated 916 family of motorcycles. His touch was sorely missed, when Ducati replaced the 916 series with the Pierre Terblanche designed 999 family. However, Ducati’s loss was CRC/Cagiva/MV Agusta’s gain and the stunning MV Agusta F4 and Brutale serve to underline all that is “right” with Italian motorcycle design in the 21st century.

Part I – The Track and Dyno

My first exposure to Buzz’s Brutale came at Willow Springs Raceway’s “Big Track”. A sun and wind blasted wide-open expanse of asphalt snaking through the Mojave foothills, Willow Springs isn’t what one would call an “ideal” place to evaluate streetfighter type motorcycles. However, Willow does allow one to concentrate on a motorcycle’s steady-state suspension feedback, not to mention the motor’s ability to pull the bike through various 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th gear stretches.

During my racetrack ride, the Brutale amazed me with its ability to feel very light, while remaining stable everywhere around the track. It amazed me with its powerful six-piston Nissin brakes and ability to repeatedly scrub speed like a racebike (Believe me, I can burn the stock brakes off most bikes in about 12 laps, but these Nissins were every bit as good as the best Brembos I’ve tested.) I was likewise amazed by its super-compact dimensions and racebike aggressive footpeg position.

You’d think all this amazement would result in my loving the Brutale on the racetrack. Alas, somehow I found the bike a little disconcerting at speed. It did sound nice, and it sure was eager to wheelie out of the pit lane. It even remained quite fun on track right up to a 90% pace. However, once the tires were warm and I started probing max lean angle, I found it hard to decipher what the bike was telling me. This feeling never caused any scary “moments” but it did keep me from pushing any harder. Some of this is no doubt caused by not having the suspension completely dialed-in, but that doesn’t explain all of it. The problem isn’t the “standard” upright style handlebars either, because I’ve won more than 30 Expert roadraces on motorcycles equipped with similar handlebars, so it’s safe to say that I’m used to the differences between clip-ons and regular handlebars, when it comes to front tire weighting and feedback.

Buzz’s Brutale was set-up with way too little compression and rebound damping for truly fast riding. After awkwardly tiptoeing around for my     first four laps, I came back to the pits and maxed the rebound damping adjustment. I also added a few clicks of compression damping. This made a noticeable improvement during subsequent sessions, but I still think the bike needs more rebound damping or perhaps a set of lighter springs.

I’ve heard quite a bit about MV’s radial-valve 750cc inline-four and not all of it was positive. The gist of it being that the bike sounds awesome, but pulls more like a strong 600, rather than a modern 750cc “Superbike”. My firsthand racetrack experience served to validate those rumors, as the bike does indeed feel a bit soft on acceleration and the engine seems to prefer that you rev it to the moon, while tap dancing on the shifter. When you comply with its wishes, the Brutale rewards you with a healthy pull and some seriously sexy sounds. Some people say “Ferrari”, when they describe the engine’s note, but to me it is more of a raspy high-revving four cylinder snarl-wail, than a sonorous V-12 howl.

There is little doubt that the engine sounds cool as you troll through the pits blipping the throttle. However, even when properly warmed-up, the engine has a tendency to stall if you let the revs fall back to idle too quickly. It stalled on me three times in the pits at Willow and once more rolling up to a stoplight in LA traffic. It would seem that the fuel injection mapping needs a few more hours of fine-tuning. This impression was further reinforced when I ran the Brutale on MO’s Dynojet Dyno, as there is a noticeable hitch around 4,000RPM and considerable smoke on overrun when the throttle is chopped. I suspect an overly rich fuel map to be the culprit, but then again I’m no mechanic.

Even with the wonky injection mapping, the 750cc Brutale generates 107.2Hp and 52LbFt, with both peaks arriving at 11,000-RPM. More relevant for street use, is the fact that the Brutale stays above 40LbFt, from just above 5,000RPM, all the way to its 13,000-RPM rev limiter. For comparison, the 636cc Kawasaki ZX-6R generates 108.3Hp @ 12,700-RPM and 47.1LbFt @ 11,000-RPM, with a noticeably softer low-mid range than the MV’s 750 motor. With the slightly puzzling racetrack handling and the under achieving motor, it’s really no surprise that my personal recommendation is to look elsewhere for your next “naked” track day bike.

Part II – The Street

Ok, so now KPaul can proceed to tell all of us why the Brutale is inferior to a GSX-R750 on the Price:Performance chart. While he is busy babbling away, it is important to note that forreal world street motorcycling, the underwhelming engine performance will still be way more than sufficient for sport riding. Not to mention the fact that the Brutale still makes more power than 1000cc sportbikes did 15 years ago. Trust me, the Brutale isn’t slow.

On the street, the Brutale’s rough edges are somehow less obtrusive. I don’t think they are any less pronounced, it’s just that the lower dynamic demands of the street team with the sexy engine sounds and cause the rider to overlook the bike’s shortcomings, as he is distracted by the bikes’ overall attitude and overwhelmed by the simple joy of piloting a great looking motorcycle that’s blessed with an abundance of “character”. Much like Aprilia’s     stellar Tuono, the MV Brutale has an innate ability to turn the mundane into the extraordinary and the minor moving violation into a 1st degree felony.

I’m not really sure which of the bike’s traits are most offensive to the local constabulary. Is it the “less quiet” nature of the Brutale’s intake and exhaust, or is it the fact that while riding in any gear lower than 4th, the bike -more likely than not- is wagging its front tire about three feet off the pavement? These are real problems that cause genuine traffic citations and generate grouchy neighbors. These are EXACTLY the problems that hooligan bike buyers pay good money to obtain.

On the street, the Brutale doesn’t disappoint. I was smiling in my helmet, every time the bike would make that rough transition through 4-5K RPM, because I knew that it was about to stretch my arms and time-warp forward to the next group of caged sheep. Between playing with the sound, the acceleration and the wheelies, there is little consideration left for officer avoidance. Giggles ensue.

img_7795On a more practical note, Like most bikes in its class, the Brutale offers a good view of traffic and the handlebars work well with the taut chassis, giving the bike a nimble feeling that encourages the rider to shoot those  ill-advised gaps and generally carve-up surrounding traffic in an antisocial, non-PC manner. That quick witted nature and comfortable riding position is precisely the stuff that makes a hooligan bike so well suited to life as a commuter or courier bike. However, in the Brutale’s case, mundane commuting or god forbid courier’s ratbike duty would border on sacrilege. The fragile aluminum wheels probably wouldn’t last a month on LA’s freeways and surface streets. Furthermore, the high-and-tight pegs would turn knee replacement surgery into a semi-annual event, while the harsh and choppy suspension would earn your chiropractor a new Rolex every week. No, the Brutale’s ideal place is to be parked in a place of honor, where it can be admired between the occasional fling. It really should be the second or third bike in your garage, not your daily thrasher. It’s a bike for the accomplished rider who is mature enough to stay out of jail (most of the time) yet still spry enough to treat her like the spicy Italian slut that she is.

Part III – Living with the Brutale, An Owner’s Perspective

Story by Buzglyd

“She’ll burn your house down and crash you car, but one night with her will be worth all of it.” Have you ever met a girl like that? (Yes, and they were all redheads -Sean) I have and she was gone, after a ten-day whirlwind romance. The MV Agusta Brutale is the motorcycling equivalent. My infatuation with the naked MV came upon me shortly after my purchase of a 2003 Ultra Classic Electra Glide. I triumphantly took down my computer’s Harley-Davidson wallpaper after buying the E Glide, since my beloved Harley was now in my garage. After seeing her in person at the Long Beach Motorcycle Show, I decided to replace my HD wallpaper with a photo of the MV Brutale, rather than a pic of some big-breasted bimbo. This was a big mistake! I did not intend to actually buy another motorcycle. I already had a nice Ducati ST4 alongside the Electra Glide, making for the perfect V-twin harmony in my garage. But she just kept calling me. I had no room in my life for such a temptress, but I couldn’t get her out of my brain. I closed my eyes and her image would be in front of me…..Oh wait! We’re talking about a motorcycle here, aren’t we? Sorry.

Buzz_BrutaleBlame it on Yossef then. His Brutale ride report and description sent me into a frenzy. I was now stalking the MV- magazine articles, bike shows, and finally a visit to GP Motorcycles in San Diego. One test ride and I was smitten. I rode home on my Ducati and drove back the next day with my truck, slipping my checkbook into my back pocket, before walking into the dealership. Upon loading the bike into the back of my truck, a car stopped in the middle of the street, a girl leaned out the window and said, “Damn you look good sitting on that bike.” Of course, she was talking to Paul Lima of GP Motorcycles rather than me, but the point is, the Brutale leaves people slack-jawed.

img_7914I appreciate the “ART” of a motorcycle, more than performance statistics. This helps to explain why no Japanese liter bikes take up space in my garage. The MV is simply an absolute stunner. The lines, materials, colors, sound and shape all morph into moto-perfection. People talk to you at stoplights. You can park it in front of a restaurant and watch motorcyclists and non-motorcyclists alike circle it slowly like some ancient mating ritual. I sneak into the garage at least once a day to make sure she’s still there.

So what’s she like to own? Beyond the looks, there is the sound. This is one of the sexiest sounding four cylinder motors ever. I can’t believe this thing is street legal, because it is quite loud. The 750cc four has a nice raspy exhaust note and the intake honk right around 6,000 RPM is pure 60s Ferrari (Not a chance! Sure, it sounds great, but no four cylinder will ever sound as nice as a Colombo or Lampredi designed 60° V-12 sucking     through six twin-choke Webers. But we digress… -Sean). The suspension is a bit harsh, but it gets better the faster you ride the bike. I softened it up too much prior to our track day, leaving Sean a little disappointed. However, trust me the firmer settings would have been perfect. True to its name, the Brutale is quite brutal on Interstate 5 though. Bring your kidney belt. The bike changes direction quickly and upon changing the tires from stock Michelin Pilot Sports to Pirelli’s excellent Diablo Corsa (thank you Pirelli!), she sticks like glue. As an added bonus, wheelies are a breeze with the short wheelbase.

img_7969Dealers are few and far between – just two in California. My experience with the local dealer “GP Motorcycles” has been excellent. They’ve taken care of my Ducati and were quite fair during my purchase and subsequent break-in service of the MV. The bike runs a little rich and we’ll see about a possible remap and perhaps a few more ponies! Fuel mileage is a dismal 25 mpg, so you’ll be a frequent customer at your local filling station. I recently purchased a Marsee tail bag to add a little luggage capacity, but a sport tourer it is not. The tough seat and stiff suspension limit your days to about 150 miles or so.

Listen fellow MOFOs, life is short and we only get few opportunities to own something truly special in our lives. You can argue that the Brutale is way more expensive than a Kawasaki Z1, but it’s still cheaper than a new Hyundai. Go ahead, take the plunge. You can always buy a new house and car.

F4 BRUTALE S
SPECS PROVIDED BY MV AGUSTA
MSRP $13,995
ENGINE
Type Four cylinder, 4 stroke, 16 valve
Timing system “D.O.H.C”, radial valve
Total displacement 45.7 cu. in.
Compression ratio 12:1
Starting Electric
Bore x stroke 2.9 in. x 1.7 in.
Claimed Max. horse power – r.p.m. (at the crankshaft) 93,4 Kw (127 CV) at 12500 r.p.m. – Lim. 13100 r.p.m.
Max. torque – r.p.m. 7,9 Kgm at 10500
Cooling system Liquid cooled, oil cooler
Engine management system “Weber Marelli” 1,6 M ignition – injection integrated system; induction discharge electronic ignition,”Multipoint” electronic injection
Clutch Wet, multi – disc
Gear box Cassette gearbox; six speed, constant mesh
Primary drive 47/81
Gear ratio First gear: Speed 13/38 64.2 mph at 13100 r.p.m.
Second gear: Speed* 14/31 84.8 mph at 13100 r.p.m.
Third gear: Speed* 18/32 105.6 mph at 13100 r.p.m.
Fourth gear: Speed* 20/30 125.1 mph at 13100 r.p.m.
Fifth gear: Speed* 22/29 142.3 mph at 13100 r.p.m.
Sixth gear: Speed* 19/23 155.3 mph at 13100 r.p.m. electronically limited
Final velocity ratio 14×41
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
Voltage 12 V
Alternator 650 W at 5000 r.p.m.
Battery 12 V – 9 Ah
DIMENSIONS AND WEIGHT
Wheelbase 55.65 in.
Overall lenght 79.75 in.
Overall width 32.28 in.
Saddle height 31.70 in.
Min. ground clearance 5.32 in.
Trail 4.00 in.
Dry weight 407.9 lb
Fuel tank capacity 4.16 Brit. gal. ( reserve fuel: 0.88 Brit. gal. )
PERFORMANCE
Maximum speed* 155.3 mph electronically limited
FRAME
Type CrMo Steel tubular trellis (TIG welded)
Rear swing arm pivot plates: material Aluminium alloy
FRONT SUSPENSION
Type “UPSIDE – DOWN” telescopic hydraulic fork with rebound-compression damping and spring preload adjustment
Rod dia. 1.97 in.
Travel on leg axis 4.65 in.
REAR SUSPENSION
Type Progressive,single shock absorber with rebound – compression damping and spring preload (F4 SPR, F4 Agostini and F4 Brutale rear suspension fully adjustable)
Single sided swing arm: material Aluminium alloy
Wheel travel 4.72 in.
BRAKE
Front brake Double steel floating disc
Flange: material Steel
disc dia.; caliper piston number and dia. 12.2 in.; 6 with 0.89 in. dia.; 1.00 in. dia.; 1.19 in. dia.
Rear brake Single steel disc
disc dia.; caliper piston number and dia. 8.27 in.; 4 with 1.00 in. dia.
RIM
Front: Material / size Aluminium alloy 3,50″ x 17″
Rear: Material / size Aluminium alloy 6,00″ x 17″
TYRE
Front 120/65 – ZR 17 (56 W)
Rear 190/50 – ZR 17 (73 W) or 180/55 – ZR 17 (73 W)
FAIRING
Material Thermoplastic

Church Of MO – 2004 MV Agusta Brutale S On The Track, Dyno & Street appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Wayne Rainey Talks About MotoAmerica + Video
Wayne Rainey Talks About MotoAmerica + Video [message #6894] Sat, 22 November 2014 11:25
Anonymous

The most exciting bit of news about the 2015 racing season is that the series is under new management. The Wayne Rainey-led MotoAmerica series has high ambitions of developing emerging American talent to hopefully stand on the top step of the podium one day in MotoGP.

In this video, Rainey talks about his vision for the series. Of particular interest is the mention that MotoAmerica will run in conjunction with both MotoGP rounds next year, at Indianapolis Motor Speedway and the Circuit of the Americas (as well as the World Superbike round at Laguna Seca). This exposure to the top teams in international racing is what America’s budding talent needs. It’s how guys like Rainey, Schwantz, Spencer, Lawson, Roberts, et al. made their way overseas. Check out what Rainey has to say in the video below.

Wayne Rainey Talks About MotoAmerica + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Weekend Awesome Front Wheel Swap During a Wheelie
Weekend Awesome Front Wheel Swap During a Wheelie [message #6893] Sat, 22 November 2014 09:00
Anonymous

Trying to change your front tire but don’t have a stand to lift your bike? No problem! All you need are the proper tools, a truck, and a friend who’s really good at performing wheelies.

At least, that’s what we got out of this video comes from Wetten, Dass..?,  a German variety show featuring people performing some pretty difficult and bizarre tasks.

For this challenge, two stunt riders and a support crew on a truck swap out the front wheel on a BMW F800R while performing a wheelie down a long runway.

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

Easy, no?

Weekend Awesome – Front Wheel Swap During a Wheelie appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: 2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Review
2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Review [message #6888] Fri, 21 November 2014 20:36
Anonymous

The Gods of Torque looked down upon the land and saw the Star Raider muscling its way through the atmosphere – its rider clinging to the grips, vainly trying to become more aerodynamic – and they decided to help the poor mortal to better enjoy the awesome engine that their powers had wrought. By their command, salvation for the rider, in the form of a bullet cowling, descended from the heavens, magically attaching itself to the triple clamp. And all was right in the world.

2012 Star Raider SCL Review

Okay, so maybe this isn’t exactly how the 2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl came into existence, but the effect of one simple addition to Star’s muscular chopper is no less transformative. Since its introduction in 2008, the Raider has been all about attitude in the form of its 1854cc (113ci), 48-degree air-cooled V-Twin. Sourced from the Star Roadliner and Stratoliner, this engine was dropped into a chassis that is lower in weight and heavy on aggressive styling – with the fat 210-series tire and the 39° rake stealing the show from the Liner’s more pedestrian 190 and 31° bits. The result is a bike that, with its 21-in. front wheel and rearward angling lines, looks ready to launch.

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Action

On the leading edge of the lower pipe’s heat shield, the bolt that contacts after the peg feelers can be seen. The peg mounting bracket comes shortly thereafter.

But back to the engine. The two pistons operating through a bore and stroke of 100.0 x 118.0mm have, in the past, shown us dyno numbers which are certain to make a V-Twin torque junkie smile knowingly. To wit: 103.4 lb-ft at 2200 rpm and 81.8 hp at 4400 rpm. Whacking open the Bullet Cowl’s butterflies delivers a pull of similar proportions. Additionally, the power delivery is silky smooth with one small quibble. While maintaining neutral throttle is quite easy, the transition from neutral throttle to full-on engine braking can be abrupt. After some time riding this beefy Twin, it recedes into the background only to call attention to itself when it occurs mid-corner, like in a decreasing-radius highway entrance ramp. Big Twins are known for their healthy engine braking, so this characteristic should come as no surprise, but more modern EFI systems are able to alleviate this condition.

In the straight-up-and-down world of the Stop Light Grand Prix, tire-spinning launches and their tell-tale pavement tattoos are regular occurrences – unless you can restrain your inner hooligan. While riding at a more grown-up pace, the engine remains pleasantly smooth until it hits its upper rev range, and the only reason to go there is because you’re not behaving like a grown-up. So, around town, and even on the highway, the Raider’s 113 cubic inches offers tractable power delivery with only a hint of vibration at most speeds.

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl  Engine

Say it with me: One-hundred thirteen cubic inches. Rolls off the tongue, doesn’t it?

Speaking of riding on the highway, the bullet cowl from which this Raider gets its name is nothing short of a revelation. Yeah, I know what you’re thinking, Star slapped new graphics and a bikini fairing on a Raider and called it a new model. The thing is: The bullet cowl makes the Raider much more fun to ride if you go any distance at elevated speeds. And I do mean elevated. When approaching the ton (not that MO would ever condone breaking posted speed limits), rather than struggling to hang on in the face of the wind blast, the Raider Bullet Cowl remains easy to ride with a relaxed grip on the bar. My 5’ 11” frame experienced no helmet-level buffeting at these speeds – unlike those barn doors of windshields that cruisers are sometimes saddled with. Enough air still makes it around the cowl to allow for effective cooling during hot weather, too.

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl

Who would have thought that simply adding this sultry cowl would change the riding experience so dramatically? The mirrors’ shape is pretty cool, too.

The only criticism I could find about the bullet cowl itself is that it leaves a large, empty space on the inside of the cowl above the headlight – smack, dab in the middle of the rider’s line of sight – but I know if Star’s accessories department hasn’t already started working on some storage device, the aftermarket will.

Mainstream Choppers Shootout

Once you look past the improved high-speed riding experience (meaning any speed above 60 mph, actually), the Raider Bullet Cowl is the same fun-to-ride bruiser that it’s been since 2008. The dual 298mm discs, clamped by four-piston monoblock calipers, deliver impressive stopping power. Although low-speed maneuvers can be a bit awkward, the Raider’s handling is good for a raked out cruiser – with the handlebar offering plenty of leverage to muscle the bike when necessary. While the rear suspension only offers 3.5 in. of travel, Star managed to get the most out of the shock’s stroke, taking care of most road irregularities except sharp-edged bumps. In fast cornering situations, the chassis and the shock’s rebound will tend to wind up over rippling pavement, but the times that most Raiders are pushed this way are few and far between.

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Interior

There’s enough room in here to pack your lunch.

The lean angle before the Raider touches down peg feelers is just a hair better than cruiser average (which is still a tad too soon). However, on the left, there is still room to lean the bike over even further before other hard parts start grinding. To the right, a muffler clamp ends the party shortly after the peg touches down.

First Ride: 2008 Star Raider

Star has taken a cruiser that has been around for seven model years and managed to make it seem new again with the simple addition of the bullet cowl – or maybe it was just the right time to rediscover what a fun bike the Raider has been all these years. The 2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl is available in dealers now for $15,390. The only color option is Raven, but as is typical of Stars, the paint quality and the bike’s fit and finish are quite nice.

+ Highs

  • Intoxicating torque
  • Improved rider comfort
  • Did we mention the torque?
- Sighs

  • Limited ground clearance in right turns
  • We have to return it to Star
  • Only available in black (Raven)

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Action

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Specs
MSRP $15,390
Engine Capacity 1854cc (113 cu. in.)
Engine Type Air-cooled 48° V-Twin
Bore x Stroke 100.0 x 118.0mm
Compression 9.5:1
Fuel System Fuel injection
Ignition TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Valve Train Pushrod/Overhead Valve, 4 valves per cylinder
Transmission Five-speed
Final Drive Belt
Front Suspension Telescopic fork; 5.1-in travel
Rear Suspension Single, preload-adjustable shock; 3.5-in travel
Front Brakes Dual 298mm disc, 4-piston calipers
Rear Brakes Single, 310mm disc, single-piston caliper
Front Tire 120/70-21M/C 62H
Rear Tire 210/40-18M/C 73H
Seat Height 27.4 inches
Wheelbase 70.9 inches
Rake/Trail 39° / NA
Wet weight 730 lb.
Fuel Capacity 4.2 gal.
Colors Raven

2015 Star Raider Bullet Cowl Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: 2014-2015 Triumph Models Recalled for ECU Problem
2014-2015 Triumph Models Recalled for ECU Problem [message #6887] Fri, 21 November 2014 13:11
Anonymous

Triumph is recalling several 2014 and 2015 motorcycles because of a problem with the engine control units. The recall affects the Bonneville, Bonneville T100, Thruxton, Scrambler, Tiger 800, Tiger 800XC, Speedmaster, America, Thunderbird, Thunderbird Storm, Rocket III Touring and Rocket III Roadster. As of this writing, recalls have been announced in the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada but we expect a similar recall in the next few days for the U.S. market.

According to Transport Canada, the ECU may inadvertently activate one of the fuel injectors, causing it to fill one of the engine cylinders. This may cause the affected motorcycle to fail to start or, if the motorcycle is already operating, may cause one engine cylinder to lose ignition due to excessive fueling. The U.K.’s Vehicle and Operator Safety Agency the problem is caused by ECU components which may be “incompatible when operating at extremes of tolerance”.

Triumph dealers will correct the problem by replacing the ECU on affected units.

We will provide more information when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announces a similar recall for the U.S.

2014-2015 Triumph Models Recalled for ECU Problem appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: 2014 Honda CBR650F: MD Ride Review (Bike Reports) (News)
2014 Honda CBR650F: MD Ride Review (Bike Reports) (News) [message #6892] Fri, 21 November 2014 10:58
Anonymous
Asking somebody if they ever had a CBR600F2 is like asking if they’ve ever tried McDonald’s fries or flown in a 737. Just ask what year or color, because when it comes to sportbikes, I can’t think of many that rival the F2’s mix of handling, performance, reliability and value, which is why everyone I […]... Click Here for Article
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Current Time: Thu Nov 27 22:57:55 EST 2014