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Forum: Vendor Forum (HTML Format)
 Topic: Total Control Level 1 (TCARC1) July 26th - ONE DAY SALE
Total Control Level 1 (TCARC1) July 26th - ONE DAY SALE [message #5672] Fri, 25 July 2014 12:06
Anonymous
****** OFFER EXTENDED **** RESPOND BY 10PM *****
(give those that were working all day a chance to see it.)


Hey Everyone,

Sharp Rider has a Total Control Level 1 course running tomorrow and we still have a few spots open.

So.... ONE DAY SALE. Save $100 today only, for the TCARC1 course that is running tomorrow!

Regular cost: 375.00. Today, between now and 6pm $275.00.

Email or call before 6pm today and save 100 dollars for the TCARC1 course that is running tomorrow (July 26th). At this price, you might consider doing it again just to get the additional practice and learning.

Sharp Rider Motorcycle Training Team
Email: info@sharprider.com
Tel: 647-885-1801Website: www.sharpridermotorcycletraining.com

From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Reverse Auction-Bazzaz ZFi-TC 09-12 ZX6R-new-missing quickshift switch-opens @ 500
Reverse Auction-Bazzaz ZFi-TC 09-12 ZX6R-new-missing quickshift switch-opens @ 500 [message #5649] Wed, 23 July 2014 15:21
Anonymous
Competition Cycle desperately needs more space, and besides, I'm sick of looking at this stuff. So..instead of waiting around for someone to come out and buy a specific item, I'm going to put a few post a few things up here at a reasonably good price, then reduce it by a specific amount every day. Here's the way it works.


1) Items will go down by 10$, 5$ a day until sold. less expensive item will go down every other day.
2) all sales are final !! So, make sure it fits before you buy it. No returns, credits... nothing! you don't like it, or it doesn't fit....too bad resell it yourself.
3) if you want to pay over the phone, by VISA/MC,EMT or PayPal that's ok, but all sales are final---you buy it -you own it.
4) No deposits, items must be paid in full
5) no saving something for anybody. item is available to everyone ..until its bought and paid for. I don't care who you are...fair is fair
6) I can't update everyday, so do the math if you have to
7) Most of these items are closeouts from the distributor, and some have been discontinued from the manufacturer, so there are no warrantees on these items. Depending on the item, you may be required to sign a waiver
8) You pay HST at Walmart, so why should I be any different. You live in Canada, so suck it up, princess

and most importantly:


:cool: I'm the boss, I reserve the right to change the rules as I go along!

- Bazzaz ZFi-TC 09-12 ZX6R-new, but missing quickshift switch opens today(July 22)@ 500$ reduces by $10 every day until it gone!

From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: BikerBoyz 11 - BIKE SHOW - STUNT SHOW - THIS SUNDAY! Jul 27th, 2014!
BikerBoyz 11 - BIKE SHOW - STUNT SHOW - THIS SUNDAY! Jul 27th, 2014! [message #5648] Wed, 23 July 2014 13:08
Anonymous
Sunday July 27th, 2014
from 1pm-9pm
(Rain date: Sun Aug 3)

@ The Woodbine Centre - 500 Rexdale Blvd (SE Parking Lot)
BIKERBOYZ 11
Featuring...
The BIGGEST Outdoor Bike MEET of the Year!
The Miss 2RIDE Pageant 2013
Custom Motorcycle Show N Shine
Bikini Bike Wash
Motorcycle Accessories & Apparel on Sale
Food & Drinks on Sale

HUNDREDS OF FREE ITEMS TO GIVEAWAY!
- Kickstand Pucks
- Helmets
- Gloves
- Tshirts
- Jackets
- Sweaters
- Accessories
- Calendars
AND MUCH MORE!

Over 5000 Bikes Expected!

Daytona Motor Sport Will Be There, Will You??


From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Competition Cycle Reverse Auctions- Bell Custom 500 Lace Green Med opens @ 88.50
Competition Cycle Reverse Auctions- Bell Custom 500 Lace Green Med opens @ 88.50 [message #5636] Tue, 22 July 2014 18:26
Anonymous
Competition Cycle Reverse Auctions



Competition Cycle desperately needs more space, and besides, I'm sick of looking at this stuff. So..instead of waiting around for someone to come out and buy a specific item, I'm going to put a few post a few things up here at a reasonably good price, then reduce it by a specific amount every day. Here's the way it works.


1) Items will go down by 10$, 5$ a day until sold. less expensive item will go down every other day.
2) all sales are final !! So, make sure it fits before you buy it. No returns, credits... nothing! you don't like it, or it doesn't fit....too bad resell it yourself.
3) if you want to pay over the phone, by VISA/MC,EMT or PayPal that's ok, but all sales are final---you buy it -you own it.
4) No deposits, items must be paid in full
5) no saving something for anybody. item is available to everyone ..until its bought and paid for. I don't care who you are...fair is fair
6) I can't update everyday, so do the math if you have to
7) Most of these item are closeouts from the distributor, and some have been discontinued from the manufacturer, so there are no warrantees on these items. Depending on the item, you may be required to sign a waiver.


and most importantly:


8) I'm the boss, I reserve the right to change the rules as I go along!




Here goes: Bell Custom 500 Lace Green Med opens today(July 22) @ 88.50 reduces by $5 every other day until its gone
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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Competition Cycle Reverse Auctions- Bell Custom 500 Freedom Machine Med opens @ 88.50
Competition Cycle Reverse Auctions- Bell Custom 500 Freedom Machine Med opens @ 88.50 [message #5635] Tue, 22 July 2014 17:58
Anonymous
Competition Cycle Reverse Auctions

Competition Cycle desperately needs more space, and besides, I'm sick of looking at this stuff. So..instead of waiting around for someone to come out and buy a specific item, I'm going to put a few post a few things up here at a reasonably good price, then reduce it by a specific amount every day. Here's the way it works.


1) Items will go down by 10$, 5$ a day until sold. less expensive item will go down every other day.
2) all sales are final !! So, make sure it fits before you buy it. No returns, credits... nothing! you don't like it, or it doesn't fit....too bad resell it yourself.
3) if you want to pay over the phone, by VISA/MC,EMT or PayPal that's ok, but all sales are final---you buy it -you own it.
4) No deposits, items must be paid in full
5) no saving something for anybody. item is available to everyone ..until its bought and paid for. I don't care who you are...fair is fair
6) I can't update everyday, so do the math if you have to
7) Most of these item are closeouts from the distributor, and some have been discontinued from the manufacturer, so there are no warrantees on these items. Depending on the item, you may be required to sign a waiver

and most importantly:


8) I'm the boss, I reserve the right to change the rules as I go along!

Bell Custom 500 Freedom Machine Med opens today(July 22)@ 88.50 reduces by $5 every other day
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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Chain and Sprocket Deal
Chain and Sprocket Deal [message #5620] Mon, 21 July 2014 10:29
Anonymous
$219.99 plus tax for any of the below in stock chain/sprocket combos. Once these are gone the deal will obviously be done. The sprockets are Driven (front and rear) and the chain is RK520GXW (520 pitch).

Below are the sets that are available and what the sprockets are. For anyone that has not bought sprockets before, the -/+ front and rear numbers means how many less or more teeth these sprockets have then a stock sprocket. If you have any questions about anything just post up, PM, email (rpmoto722 at gmail dot com) or contact us through our new facebook page.

Be sure to like us on facebook also for motorcycle videos, pictures and deals.

SUZUKI:
GSXR 600 (06-10) -1 front, +2 rear
GSXR 750 (06-08 ) -2 front, even rear
GSXR 750 (00-05) -2 front, +3 rear
GSXR 1000 (01-06) -2 front, +3 rear
GSXR 1000 (07-08 ) -2 front, +2 rear

Honda:
CBR600RR (03-06) -1 front, +1 rear
CBR600RR (07-10) -1 front, +2 rear
CBR600F4i (01-05) -1 front, -2 rear
CBR 929/954 (00-03) -1 front, +1 rear
CBR1000RR (04-05) -1 front, +3 rear
CBR1000RR (05-09) -1 front, +2 rear

Yamaha:
R6 (06-14) -1 front, +2 rear
R6S (06-09) -1 front, -1 rear
FZ6 (04-09) -1 front, +1 rear
FZ6 FAZER (04-05) -1 front, +1 rear

From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
 Topic: Just a Reminder... We Are Opened 7 Days a Week All Summer! - Daytona Motor Sport
Just a Reminder... We Are Opened 7 Days a Week All Summer! - Daytona Motor Sport [message #5607] Sun, 20 July 2014 12:02
Anonymous
Just a Reminder, Our Summer Hours Are "We Are Opened 7 Days A Week!"

We have had a few inquires about what days we are opened lately with all the stores in the area either closing down or cutting their hours back.

YES, we are still opened EVERY DAY!


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Our Showroom & Retail Store: 4000 Steeles Ave W, Unit 12
Vaughan, Ontario L4L 1V9 (Weston Rd / Steeles Ave)
1 Light West of Weston Rd.

Daytona Motor Sport

Monday - 10am-7pm
Tuesday - 10am-7pm
Wednesday 10am-7pm
Thursday 10am-7pm
Friday 10am-7pm
Saturday 11am-7pm
Sunday -11am-5pm

Tel: 905-605-7666

http://www.DaytonaMotorSport.ca
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From Greater Toronto Area Motorcycle forum. Link: here
Forum: Motorcycle Site Feeds
 Topic: You Can Buy Wayne Rainey’s Title Winning 1990 Yamaha YZR 500 for $170,000 (News)
You Can Buy Wayne Rainey’s Title Winning 1990 Yamaha YZR 500 for $170,000 (News) [message #5671] Fri, 25 July 2014 21:50
Anonymous
Are you still dreaming about owning a two-stroke 500cc GP race bike? A German collector has offered for sale a 1990 Yamaha YZR 500 works racer used by Wayne Rainey to take his first of three 500 GP titles. Here is the link with the details. Just a heads up to our wealthy readers … […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Harley-Davidson Confirms Project Livewire Will Appear In Avengers Movie
Harley-Davidson Confirms Project Livewire Will Appear In Avengers Movie [message #5664] Fri, 25 July 2014 19:07
Anonymous

From the “Unless-You’ve-Been-Living-Under-A-Rock” department comes Harley-Davidson’s announcement today at the San Diego Comic-Con, that H-D’s first electric motorcycle, the Livewire, will indeed be used in Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron movie as the ride of choice for Natasha Romanoff (a.k.a. Black Widow) played by Scarlett Johansson, in an epic scene with Captain America in the film.

Of course, if you’ve been following Motorcycle.com for a while you’ll have known this already, as we brought you the scoop about Livewire. Not only that, but we also brought you a first ride review of the Livewire, along with a video, to boot.

Interestingly, as Harley-Davidson is still gauging interest in Livewire, fans attending the San Diego Comic-Con will get their chance to see the bike up close and personal while there. Fans with motorcycle endorsements on their licenses will be able to ride the bike at the San Diego Harley-Davison dealership July 25-26 and provide feedback to help shape the future of Harley-Davidson’s first-ever electric motorcycle.

It will be revealing to see what fans in attendance and those who ride the bike will say about Livewire. As Harley is aiming at a younger demographic for the e-bike, Comic-Con gathers a large swath of the intended audience for this motorcycle. There’s no doubt H-D is crossing its collective fingers for positive feedback from this group.

Learn more about Project Livewire and The Experience Tour, visit www.projectlivewire.com.

Harley-Davidson Confirms Project Livewire Will Appear In Avengers Movie appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Michelin Launches Motorcycle Tire Review Site
Michelin Launches Motorcycle Tire Review Site [message #5663] Fri, 25 July 2014 18:35
Anonymous

Michelin’s Two-Wheel business has launched a new online tool designed to capture consumer feedback about the performance of Michelin motorcycle tires. The site, located at mototirereviews.michelin.com, represents a continued effort to seek consumer feedback in an effort to provide products to meet the needs of today’s motorcycle riders.

The site highlights consumer feedback of products with a five star rating system as well as allowing users to provide their riding profile along with their motorcycle’s year, make and model, share their personal experience with Michelin motorcycle tires, and upload two favorite photos.

Scot Clark, Michelin’s Two-Wheel marketing manager explains, “The site grew out of a need to streamline the gathering of consumer testimonials, but it was clear that we needed a dedicated site to share this data. In the end, we gained a site that satisfies both needs.” Clark goes on to explain that consumers typically rely on objective feedback and recommendations from other consumers prior to purchase—whether solicited from friends and family or popular publications.

This website fills that gap offering consumers a valid and objective resource to read about real-world experiences with Michelin motorcycle tires directly on the Michelin website and without relying on forums or review sites that require membership or fees. The website can gather feedback on most motorcycle tire Michelin offers in the United States. Visitors can filter the reviews by tire model or star rating.

Additional information about Michelin’s motorcycle tires and a tire selector tool are available at Michelinmotorcycle.com

Michelin Launches Motorcycle Tire Review Site appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Great Places to Ride: Nebraska Sandhills
Great Places to Ride: Nebraska Sandhills [message #5662] Fri, 25 July 2014 18:18
Anonymous

Nebraska probably isn’t the first place you think about when it’s time for a nice motorcycle ride. Maybe that’s what makes it such a cool destination: Neither does anybody else.

It’s a state you drive through on your way to someplace else, really, which is the way it’s been since the Oregon Trail followed the North Platte River out toward the west coast, followed by the transcontinental railroad, followed by just about everybody and everything in North America not content to stay in one place. A few people who realized a good thing when they were in it stayed, but not many; Wiki says Nebraska ranks 43rd in population density.

I always assumed the entire state is one big – no, two big fields – one wheat and one corn. What I discovered is that fully a fourth of the state is ancient sand dunes covered with a light covering of prairie grass, most of which has never seen a plow. In fact, most of northwest Nebraska is a vast, rolling Sahara that happens to sit atop the Ogallala Aquifer – which makes it a grass-covered Sahara pockmarked with lakes and marshes and birds. And cows. It’s also semi-arid, not much humidity.

072514-nebraska 054 (2)

Add those up and what have you got? A beautiful, depopulated place with open sightlines where you can open up your Hayabusa during the day and get a really good steak at night. I was lucky enough to get to spend a week there recently, cruising around on a borrowed Victory Cross Country Tour.

Union Pacific Railroad, Bailey Yard, North Platte

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As a bona fide train nut, I would go to Nebraska for this alone. At the world’s biggest train yard – 8 miles long with 985 switches – trains are banging around 24/7 (in fact, full automation assures no cars hit faster than 2.5 mph), and you can go to the top of the eighty-story Golden Spike Tower to take it all in. Crews are sorting 10,000 railroad cars a day (which is not quite as impressive as it seems when you find out 70 “unit trains” a day are hauling 130 cars of coal each; good luck with lowering those emissions anytime soon). The diesel shop repairs 750 locomotives a month, which swill 14 million gallons of diesel in the same time frame. It all started when the Union Pacific took a short break here in 1876 and built a small repair facility.

072514-nebraska-goldenspiketower

The history of most of the U.S. – the parts worth inhabiting anyway – is really the history of the railroad, and the UP lays out quite a bit of it here, including the “orphan trains” which brought children from New York, including the Titanic survivors, out west to live wholesome farm lives. Or serve as free child labor. Possibly as many as 200,000 were imported from 1850 to 1930, the beginning of American foster care.

Lincoln County Historical Museum, North Platte

072514-nebraska-canteen
There probably is an inverse relationship between population density and niceness. When the families and friends of the local National Guard unit came to the train station to give their boys Christmas gifts on December 17, 1941, and found a company of unknown Kansas soldiers on the train instead, they went ahead and gave the Kansas boys the gifts anyway. Then they continued greeting and feeding every troop train to come through North Platte for the next five years, organizing volunteers from all over the state to serve more than 6 million troops before it was over – regardless of race, color or creed.

Accommodations are always up to date in Nebraska. I kid. This is an original Ft. McPherson barracks, on site at the Lincoln County Museum.

Accommodations are always up to date in Nebraska. I kid. This is an original Ft. McPherson barracks, on site at the Lincoln County Museum.

Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park, North Platte

072514-nebraska-buffalobillsplace

William F. Cody started working at eleven years old, as an ox team driver, and by the time he died broke in 1917 at his sister’s house in Denver, he’d been a fur trapper, U.S. Army scout, Pony Express rider, gold miner, buffalo hunter, 20 other things, and a famous showman whose Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show toured the U.S. and Europe. When he was flush (and he was very flush indeed), BB built his dream home, Scout’s Rest Ranch, in North Platte – the Neverland Ranch of the 19th century. It’s now beautifully restored on 233 acres, complete with barn and stream-fed swimming hole out back.

Buffalo B was a way snappy dresser.

Buffalo B was a way snappy dresser.

The Sandhills Scenic Byway, Nebraska Highway 2, takes you right through the heart of the, ahhh, Sandhills.

The Sandhills Scenic Byway, Nebraska Highway 2, takes you right through the heart of the, ahhh, Sandhills.

Tubbing on the Middle Loup

072514-nebraska-tubbing

That huge Ogallala Aquifer bubbles a steady supply of pure glacier water up into the Loup River system, making the whole area a great spring-fed place to canoe, or in this case, “tub.” The Mullen locals SandhillsMotel.com (and canoe rental) had the bright idea of packing everybody into stock tanks for a nice leisurely float down the Middle Loup. These sturdy craft are unsinkable, almost unsnaggable with their shallow draft – and able to hold plenty of people and coolers. Alternatively, you can put in at the wider, deeper Niobrara up in Valentine at GrahamOutfitters.com, and check out the Valentine National Wildlife Refuge while you’re there. Floating down a river might be the next best thing to riding your motorcycle.

Cody

072514-nebraska-sandhillbootco.

Blink on your Hayabusa and you will miss Cody, population 154, hard up against the South Dakota border on Highway 20 just west of Valentine. Unlike in the fun yet ridiculous Bruce Dern movie I just watched named Nebraska, there are a lot of sharp, well-travelled people in these little towns who just plain like it here. Stop for a bit and visit the Sandhills Boot Company, where Kyle Rosfeld makes custom boots and other leather goods on a Singer machine made in 1876.

Great Vinegar

072514-nebraska-vinegar

Meanwhile down the street, some might’ve taken offense when their daughter’s boyfriend from California said “your wine would make great vinegar.” But not George Johnson, who did a bit of research, and whose delicious handcrafted George Paul vinegars are now sought out by fine restaurants all over the country. The stuff is amazingly good.

Beaver Rules

072514-nebraska-hat

Might as well get a really nice hat to go with your new boots at the Bar None Hat Company in Thedford. Kaycee Orr-Hoffman makes some stupendous headgear.

Wine!

072514-nebraska-wine!

I can’t pass up an out-of-the-way winery, and they don’t get much more out of the way than the Niobrara Valley Vineyard – in fact it was only with the help of Baby Jesus that I got in and out of the dirt (mud) road through the cow pasture without tumping the Victory over again. Greg and Tim Nollette started out supplying grapes for George Johnson’s vinegar operation, but then George talked them into making wine too, which is a good thing as it has weaned them off the hard stuff. “They said you couldn’t grow grapes here,” says Greg, “so we decided that’s what we’d do.” The brothers’ French/American hybrid grapevines are good to 40 below zero. I like the Boss Cow white, winner of some silver medals somewhere …

Perfect 10 Bison Ranch

072514-nebraska-bison

David Hutchinson raises organic cattle and goats on his 5000 acres, too, but his heart is with the bison – the original inhabitants of this endless rolling grassland. The cows the white man brought in to replace the bison as the main food source require lots more care. When the snow gets deep, the bison will use his big head  to punch through and  eat the grass underneath, and to punch through the ice and drink, while the cow needs hay, dries out and keels over. The bison gather themselves into a ring to repel wolves, with the babies in the middle; cows just stand there and get eaten. The list goes on; one species has been here forever, the other was imported not so long ago. So why did we nearly kill off the bison anyway? Mr. Hutchinson simply passes on what the Cherokee told him: “White man big stupid.”

Water’s not a problem; deep artesian wells bring it up from the Ogallala Aquifer, and the Sand Hills are shot through with rivers and lakes.

Water’s not a problem; deep artesian wells bring it up from the Ogallala Aquifer, and the Sand Hills are shot through with rivers and lakes.

It’s hard to argue with that, but I think we’re just spoiled and cows taste a little better. I ate some nice ones in Nebraska, but can’t remember ever having a really good bison steak. Do your own investigating here. Anyway, the ranch is a lovely peaceful place to stop if you’re in the area, complete with a bed and breakfast operation, but beware the dirt road in has a few sections of deep sand.

Bowring Ranch State Historical Park

General Curtis LeMay is just one of many framed heads of the famous and crazy on Sen. Bowring’s walls.

General Curtis LeMay is just one of many framed heads of the famous and some say crazy on Sen. Bowring’s walls.

Eva Kellie Forrester was a traveling saleswoman for a bakery when her car broke down and Henry Bowring came to her rescue. They wound up married 10 years later, Henry wound up dying, and Eva wound up not only running the ranch but also becoming Nebraska’s first woman U.S. senator, in 1954. In DC, she hobnobbed with and framed pictures of all sorts of people including JFK, Ike, Harry S. Truman, Haile Selassie – and SAC Commander General Curtis LeMay, inspiration for General Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove.

The ranch house at the Bar 99 is just as she left it at her death in 1985, a fun political and domestic trip back into the mid-20th century, as the many framed heads of state juxtapose Sen. Bowring’s pink bathroom and ceramic chicken collection. Though the 7500-acre ranch now belongs to the state, it still raises tasty Herefords. I also saw a pair of young antelope on the dirt road on the way out.

Dancing Leaf Cultural Center

072514-nebraska-dancing_leaf_earth_lodge01_mforsberg01

Wow. Les Hosick at the Dancing Leaf Cultural Center claims to be a high-school drop-out but gives what sounds like doctoral-quality information about the ancestors of the Pawnee who lived along Medicine Creek thousands of years ago. Peaceful farming for hundreds (maybe thousands) of years got them no headlines. Not until European explorers arrived later with horses did these natives become nomadic, and not too much longer after that, angry and combative – much like the trajectory of the typical marriage.

Les and his wife Jan have built an earth lodge like the ones those people lived in years ago in the hills above the creek, and it’s just the thing for you adventure-bike types to stay in for a nominal fee. Paddle canoes in his pond, explore 115 acres of cedar-covered canyons, etc. The most interesting part might be all the fossils that get dug up in Medicine Creek, repository of nearly all the mastodons found in museums around the world. Nebraska was on the edge of a huge glacier at the end of the last Ice Age, and was home to camels, shovel-tusk mastodons and all sorts of creatures.

Fort Cody Trading Post

072514-nebraska-ftcodytrading

Just off I-80 in North Platte, this self-described tourist trap is actually a lot of fun – packed with all the cheesy gifts you need to bring back, but worth a visit mostly for the working diorama/model of the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show that takes up a whole corner of the store.

Gothenburg

072514-nebraska-gothenburg

Your quintessential small Swede-settled Nebraska town from the 1880s, Gothenburg has an original Pony Express station transplanted into the town park, a cool old downtown and a museum packed with things like tonsil snares. I can’t get enough stuff like that. You?

072514-nebraska-civilwarvets

I’ve got more, but that’s probably enough for now. What I mostly remember is rocking along on the Cross Country Tour around Valentine, tuning into the local 96.1 FM, which I think was coming from the big reservation just across the border in South Dakota. First, Three Dog Night played Never Been to Spain, followed by The Platters’ Life Could be a Dream, followed by some completely wacky tribal wailing unlike anything I have ever heard before – a quick trip from the ’70s to the ’50s to ancient times in 10 minutes.

They’ve been separating wheat from chaff for a long time up in here, there’s no constant chatter to distract people from what works and what’s crap. A guy I was talking to in Valentine while we were eating cows in the Peppermill told me how when we were kids and everybody had big families, lots of locals had no choice but to run off to the big city. Now, people have one or two kids – just enough to replenish the population. And now that everybody’s been to the big city, they appreciate what they’ve got here even more.

Wide-open spaces. The Sandhills isn’t only a nice place to visit, it wouldn’t be a bad place to live. Oh, I saw zero traffic officers. Fire up the Hayabusa.

072514-nebraska2 051 (2)

Great Places to Ride: Nebraska Sandhills appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: CycleAT Lets You Monitor Your Tires In Realtime + Video
CycleAT Lets You Monitor Your Tires In Realtime + Video [message #5661] Fri, 25 July 2014 18:10
Anonymous

As the only pieces of your motorcycle (or bicycle) actually in contact with the ground, tires play a vital role in your safety while on two wheels. With the proper care and maintenance, tires can last a long time and perform at their best. However, not everyone remembers to take care of their bikes. That’s where the CycleAT comes in.

Before we go any further, it’s worth mentioning that this is a Kickstarter project. Meaning, unless RDV Labs, creators of the CycleAT, don’t reach their $80,000 goal by 2:12am PST on September 20, the CycleAT won’t see the light of day.

So what is the CycleAT? In short, it’s a Bluetooth tire sensor that allows motorcyclists and bicyclists to monitor their tire pressure, temperature, and motion data all in real time. The CycleAT also can record and map your ride. To use the CycleAT, simply screw it atop the tire valves of your preferred tw0-wheeled vehicle. From there, pair your smartphone with the CycleAT via Bluetooth…and you’re done. Now the device will be in constant communication with your phone, via visual or audio notifications, keeping you up to date on the condition of your tires. 

There are numerous sensors buried inside the CycleAT, meaning its functionality goes way beyond simply monitoring tire pressure. Temperature sensors are especially important to motorcyclists, as a cold tire can mean the difference between staying up right or crashing. In addition, its lean angle sensor can provide important information for any rider looking to improve their skillset.

At the moment, the CycleAT app is only available for iOS platforms, but an Android version is said to be on its way. But again, if $80,000 isn’t reached, this whole plan gets scrapped (at press time, the CycleAT currently has raised $15,542 with 56 days left).

To learn more about the CycleAT, visit its Kickstarter page and watch the video below.

CycleAT Lets You Monitor Your Tires In Realtime + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

... Click Here for Article
 Topic: SMEC To Promote Supermoto Events In North America At All Levels
SMEC To Promote Supermoto Events In North America At All Levels [message #5660] Fri, 25 July 2014 16:07
Anonymous

The East Coast based company – Supermoto East Coast (known as SMEC) – was formed to organize and promote Supermoto events at all levels starting with a local series to a National Pro series. SMEC has dedicated themselves to provide racers with a professional racing environment and the highest level of competition over the last one and a half seasons since SMEC was created. Having extensive knowledge of the European SuperMoto market, Co-founders Marco Pedde and Jay Kliger have made it their mission to build a similar structure and race atmosphere in North America.

SMEC has announced that the current 2014 AMA Supermoto East Coast Championship Series will now continue as the “FIM North America Supermoto Championship” series for the remainder of the season and beyond. FIM-NA Supermoto is now associated with the surrounding sanctioning bodies: American Motorcycle Association (AMA), Canadian Motorcycle Association (CMA) Supermoto Quebec and Supermoto Ontario. With the support of these organizations FIM-NA Supermoto will be able to provide Supermoto racing events across North America for the remainder of 2014 and into 2015, as well as for years to come.

“Structuring SMEC-promoted events as a Continental Union series makes perfect sense,” said AMA Director of Racing Bill Cumbow, who also serves as the treasurer of FIM North America. “Working with our partners at the Canadian Motorcycle Association, which shares FIM NA governing responsibilities with the AMA, we will provide full sanctioning and operational support, as well as continental-level recognition, to this growing program.”

“We are delighted to play a role in the development of an FIM North America continental Supermoto series, and we echo the remarks of our colleague AMA Director of Racing Bill Cumbow,” added Marilynn Bastedo, CEO of the Canadian Motorcycle Association. “It will provide opportunities for growth of Supermoto in North America as well as be the stepping stone for riders to advance from national through continental to world level competition.”

Jay Kliger stated, “We’ve been working on this for some time. There was a great deal of collaboration between all parties to make this happen and we want to thank everyone involved. We are now in a position to bring Supermoto and the North American riders to a level of International exposure. We have already begun working on a 2015 schedule that will make the FIM-NA Supermoto Championship a true International series for North America.” What does this mean for current Supermoto East Coast members? All 2014 credentials, classes, championship points and events will remain the same as planned for the 2014 season. With the introduction of the FIM-NA Supermoto Championship, SMEC riders will receive year end FIM-NA Championship status for their selective class. Champions will also be inscribed into the 2014 FIM Yearbook and results will be publicized on the FIM-NA website.

FIM-NA Supermoto is excited to announce that they, with the support of the promotor of the Mettet Superbikers event, will be providing entry for the top two 2014 FIM-NA Supermoto Championship Pro SMEC1 class points finishers to race in the Mettet Superbikers event in Belgium Oct. 3- 5. This prestigious event draws hundreds of top FIM Supermoto, motocross, enduro, road racing and flat track racers from across the world to see who is the best in front of 30,000 plus Supermoto fans. Over the last two years SMEC riders Miles Thornton and the current FIM-NA Supermoto Championship Pro SMEC 1 points leader Johnny Lewis have represented for the USA at this event. Lewis & Thornton both earned 3rd place in the StarBiker event, Lewis in 2012 and Thornton in 2013.

FIM-NA Supermoto is currently working with the International Motorcycling Federation (FIM) to have a presence at the SuperMoto of Nations as early as 2014. The 2014 SuperMoto of Nations location has not been released yet by FIM but will be held on October 12th, 2014. The structure of how a team would be selected for this event will be released soon.

For more information on the new series, click the links below.

SMEC To Promote Supermoto Events In North America At All Levels appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Danny Gray Introduces Independent Suspension Line Of Motorcycle Seats
Danny Gray Introduces Independent Suspension Line Of Motorcycle Seats [message #5659] Fri, 25 July 2014 15:09
Anonymous

Danny Gray Enterprises, the Santa Ana, Calif.-based designer and manufacturer of custom motorcycle seats, recently introduced the IST (Independent Suspension Technology) line of motorcycle seats, designed to eliminate the compression and shock the body receives from riding on a traditional solid seat pan while providing the hand-crafted look, quality and performance of an aftermarket seat.

Sitting on a traditional motorcycle seat, the shocks and bumps of the road transmit into the rider’s hips and up their spine. This “whole body vibration” often leads to pain and fatigue, ultimately shortening the amount of time a person can ride comfortably. The new IST product line works by damping road impact right where it matters most – at the two lowest bone points in the pelvis called the ischial tuberosities, or ITs. IST is like two little trampolines, positioned side by side within the seat.  IST isolates the rider’s IT bones, cushioning them independently in reaction to the shocks and bumps of the road. And since IST is seamlessly built into the saddle, bike owners can have the custom look of a Danny Gray designed seat while enjoying longer, more comfortable rides.

Danny Gray IST Rider Anatomy

The IST line offers motorcyclists four models with multiple options for adding comfort and duration to their rides:

·        The MinimalIST is the entry level IST product, available in vinyl or leather covering with tailbone and stress relief, narrow width and sized for a solo rider.

·        The BigIST for the solo rider is available in vinyl or leather with tailbone and stress relief, and features a wider footprint, back support and is sized to accommodate a pillion. The BigIST is also available as a two-rider seat in a full-touring style with tailbone and stress relief, and back support, available in vinyl or leather.

·        The LowIST is a two-rider, low-profile style seat available in vinyl or leather with tailbone and stress relief, low and narrow, and cut down the rear.

·        The TourIST is a two-rider seat in a mid-touring style with tailbone and stress relief and back support.  The TourIST is available in vinyl, leather or with sweat-control Spacer Mesh Fabric and leather accents.

Danny Gray’s line of IST seats will be on display at Sturgis Rally 2014 at Black Hills Harley Davidson in Rapid City, and J&P Cycles in Sturgis.  The line will be available to dealers by July 31through Biker’s Choice and Drag Specialties.

More detailed product information is available at www.dannygray.com.

Danny Gray Introduces Independent Suspension Line Of Motorcycle Seats appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Energica Partners With Chargepoint
Energica Partners With Chargepoint [message #5658] Fri, 25 July 2014 14:36
Anonymous

Energica, the Italian manufacturer creating buzz in the electric motorcycle world for its Ego model, has partnered with Chargepoint, to provide riders access to over 18,300 EV charging stations worldwide.

If you aren’t familiar with the Energica Ego, E-i-C Kevin Duke rode the prototype in Italy some months back. He also took a spin on a production unit here on home soil just last weekend. Click here to see what he thought about it.

Until now, Chargepoint has worked exclusively with the automotive market in regards to partnerships. However, according to Erin Mellon, Chargepoint’s Communications Director, this is because no other electric motorcycle brand has approached them. “Energica actively pursued our involvement,” she says. “We are more than happy to partner with any and all electric vehicle makers.”

Energica says upon receiving their Ego, owners will be given a Driver Kit (yes, we agree it should have been called a Rider Kit), which will allow them instant access to the Chargepoint network. While a Chargepoint membership is already free, there’s typically a wait time to receive your card before you can begin charging. With the Driver Kit, Mellon says Ego owners will get two free membership cards, allowing them immediate access to charging stations. Also provided are instructions that walks riders through how and where to charge.

Visit the Energica website for more details on the Ego. You can also visit the Chargepoint website for more information on its extensive charging network and member benefits.

Energica Partners With Chargepoint appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: 2015 Energica Ego Second-Ride Review + Video
2015 Energica Ego Second-Ride Review + Video [message #5657] Fri, 25 July 2014 14:06
Anonymous

2015 Energica Ego

Editor Score: 83.0%
Engine 18.5/20
Suspension/Handling 12.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 10.0/10
Brakes 9.5/10
Instruments/Controls5.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 6.5/10
Appearance/Quality 9.5/10
Desirability 9.0/10
Value 3.0/10
Overall Score83/100

The world of electric sportbikes just got turned up a notch with the debut of the production version of the Energica Ego. Built in Italy as an adjunct business for a Formula 1 supplier, the Ego brings European style and sophistication to the e-bike market.

You may recall we had a chance to throw a leg over the Ego prototype last year in Italy, and we were impressed by how production-ready the Italian e-sportbike performed. With its oil-cooled, permanent-magnet AC motor factory-rated at 134 horsepower and 144 ft-lb of torque, it easily trumped anything from e-bike leaders Zero and Brammo, and its claim of a lofty 150-mph top speed almost seemed like it might be feasible.

2015 Energica Ego Review – First Ride

We’re still unable to verify the Ego’s top speed, but a recent ride on the production Ego solidified our initial impressions about Energica’s platform and performance. Riding on familiar roads this time around, we were able to double our impressions by bringing along one of our riding buddies, Daniel Schoenewald, for the ride.

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2013 Brammo Empulse R vs Zero S ZF11.4 + Video

What’s New

The transition from prototype to production has seen several changes and updates to the Ego. Here’s a quick rundown of the major tweaks.

  • Completely new electronics and Vehicle Control Unit.
  • New, 4.3-inch full-color TFT instrumentation.
  • Four ride modes: Standard, Sport, Eco and Rain.
  • A choice of three levels of regenerative braking and the ability to switch it off.
  • Reverse mode: Handy if parking on inclined surfaces; functions only at a crawl speed.
  • New engine cases built of cast aluminum rather than the billet pieces on the prototype.
  • Curb weight increased by 22 pounds due to the engine castings and addition of an onboard charger.
  • Swingarm made of a single aluminum casting. Wheelbase increases by 5mm to 57.9 inches.
  • New battery case to ensure waterproofness.
  • Front brake rotor diameters go up by 10mm to a large 330mm size.
  • The 240mm rear disc is larger by 20mm.
  • Bosch ABS will be standard equipment, but the system is undergoing calibration and wasn’t fitted to our test bikes.
072414-2015-energica-ego-ENERGICA EGO3

The Ego is now equipped with an onboard battery charger located under the seat, which is mostly responsible for shifting the Ego’s weight an additional 1% rearward, now at a 53/47% F/R balance.

Top Of The Range, First Off The Line

The first 45 Egos to be produced will be a high-spec version called the Ego 45 Limited Edition. Each will be individually numbered with a plaque mounted on the upper triple clamp. Electronic upgrades include GPS integration, Bluetooth connectivity and a smartphone app.

Mechanical bits raised to a higher standard are the suspension and wheels. An Ohlins FGRT NIX-30 cartridge fork leads the way, while a TTX shock holds up the rear. Wheels are OZ forged-aluminum hoops instead of the cast wheels on the base version. It is also supplied with a 20-kW DC fast-charger, an extra-cost option on the regular Ego.

The Ego 45’s bodywork is lightweight carbon fiber instead of the injection-molded plastic on the base model. It’s also graced by a smattering of 3D-printed components from Energica’s parent company, the CRP Group, a noted supplier to several Formula 1 teams.

The Ego 45’s trim pieces around the LED headlights feature a ceramic and metallic coating (Zircotec) that feel cool to the touch and look exceedingly trick.

The Ego 45’s trim pieces around the LED headlights feature a ceramic and metallic coating (Zircotec) that feel cool to a touch and look exceedingly trick.

Pretty much every limited-edition motorcycle from Italy has been expensive, and the Ego 45 continues that trend. It retails at a whopping $68,000, twice the price of the base model. If that seems too steep, consider that Energica is sweetening the deal with an Italian Lowell watch crafted from wood and individually numbered to match the number on your Ego 45.

Critical Numbers

EV batteries are expensive, and high-capacity batteries (11.7 kilowatt/hour in the Ego) are heavy. Hence, the base-model Ego is tropospherically priced at $34,000 and scales in at a hefty 584 pounds. Below are Energica-supplied numbers for range and recharging times.

Range Recharging
190 km at 60 kph (118 mi. at 37 mph) Zero to 100% via 110-volt outlet: 8 hours
150 km at 80 kph (93 mi. at 50 mph) Zero to 100% via J1772 220-volt DC charger: 3.5 hours
100 km at 100 kph (62 mi. at 62 mph) Zero to 85% via Mode-4 DC supercharger: 30 minutes.
50 km (31 mi.) when ridden on a racetrack Battery is said to be good for 1200 cycles before it
drops below 80% capacity.
The Energica Ego 45 - better living through electrons.

The Energica Ego 45 – better living through electrons.

Charged Up And Ready To Roll

Our ride was set in the twists and turns of the Santa Monica Mountains bordering the tony seaside city of Malibu, Calif. Schoenewald and I were let loose on a standard Ego (but with carbon-fiber bodywork) and the limited-production Ego 45 in its Matte Pearl White. I was quick to call dibs on the exotic Ego 45 bearing the mega-exclusive 00/45 badge.

Before taking off, Energica’s Chief Technical Officer, Giampiero Testoni, walked us through the new electronics and brilliantly vivid TFT color instrumentation. We decided to start off in the Standard ride mode and with regenerative braking in its medium setting.

An electric motor’s power delivery can be anything its engineers program into its motor controller, so a rider is never quite sure what kind of response a twist of an e-bike “throttle” will deliver. But in the Ego’s case, twisting the grip spits forth a completely intuitive response that allowed us to smoothly accelerate out of the parking lot and onto the open road.

Schoenewald (in black) is no spring chicken, but that doesn’t stop this dedicated moto enthusiast from riding like a talented 30-year-old. “I was impressed with the bike,” he said afterward.

Schoenewald (in black) is no spring chicken, but that doesn’t stop this dedicated moto enthusiast from riding like a talented 30-year-old. “I was impressed with the bike,” he said afterward.

My next test was to see how hard the Ego accelerated with the twistgrip spun to its stop. While it pulled with the supernatural response of a high-performance electric motor and an unending powerband, the thrust didn’t feel as enormous as the prototype I rode in Italy. I decided to switch it to Sport mode at the next opportunity and was rewarded with serious levels of oomph.

A few other button pushes toggled the regen braking up to its highest setting. I was wary of using the higher level of regen because I feared it would add an unnatural amount of braking force, but I couldn’t have been more impressed. Fully shutting the throttle produced a level of force very similar to that delivered from an internal-combustion engine on the overrun, so it felt entirely natural. And, just as important to smooth riding, there is an easily ascertained neutral-throttle area just behind the closed-throttle point that allows the Ego to coast without adding engine/motor braking. This well-tuned setup is ideal and feels entirely natural.

As with the prototype Ego (and the recently hyped Harley-Davidson LiveWire), the Energica is definitely not a silent motorcycle. The straight-cut transmission gears whine like something out of science-fiction movie and are a visceral audio accompaniment to a sporty ride.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire First Ride
Video of the LiveWire and interviews with execs and engineers

A face like a pissed-off hawk and a shriek that will ruffle feathers.

A face like a pissed-off hawk and a shriek that will ruffle feathers.

The Ohlins suspension on the Ego 45 was expertly set up and provided a fairly supple ride despite well-controlled damping settings. It worked so well that critiques are non-existent. The suspension on the base Ego (Marzocchi fork, lower-spec Ohlins shock) I sampled later also felt quite good, lacking only some suppleness compared to the Ego 45’s premium dampers.

Brakes, too, are top-shelf items and beyond reproach, with immense power and precise modulation. The only thing lacking is the still-absent ABS system that has delayed the Ego’s full production until April or May next year due to calibration requirements.

When riding the Ego after a petrol-powered sportbike, the first thing you’ll notice is the extra weight, especially when pulling it up off its sidestand. At nearly 600 pounds, there’s no escaping its lardiness. And yet the Ego feels considerably lighter in motion than its specs indicate. The heaviest part of the Ego, the battery, is thankfully mass-centralized between a rider’s legs, and the chassis geometry is quite aggressive, with a steep 23.5-degree rake and a tidy 100mm of trail. The result is a sportbike that responds with a quickness superior to what its weight suggests, but with a heaviness that makes a GSX-R 750 feel like a GP bike.

The Ego’s riding position is committedly sporty, but discomfort won’t set in with just 60 to 90 miles of range.

The Ego’s riding position is committedly sporty, but discomfort won’t set in with just 60 to 90 miles of range.

Agility is also slightly dulled by handlebars placed quite low and at the end of a long reach, something I griped about when I rode the prototype Ego. Bars placed higher and further back toward a rider would impart greater forces to the steering and allow the bike to turn into a corner a bit quicker.

A short trip up Pacific Coast Highway revealed the Ego’s ease of use in urban environments. No clutch to modulate, no gears to shift, and bottomless power available the instant your wrist rotates. Also, the Ego’s LED headlights are dazzling and impossible to ignore, and the bike looks impressively snazzy as it whirs down the road.

Duke’s Den – Is Electricity the Savior of Dirtbikes?

Post-Ride Numbers

After logging 46 miles on both bikes, the standard Ego had 34% of charge remaining in the battery. We had 27% charge remaining on the Ego 45, to which I blame my greedy throttle hand. I predict about 90 miles could be wrung out of the Ego if it wasn’t ridden like it was stolen and you stayed off the highway,

“Riding it was a good experience,” Schoenewald opined. “It has that great speed and rush that we look for from a motorcycle.”

Dueling Egos.

Dueling Egos.

So, the Ego is a thrilling new take on a sportbike, delivering a sporty riding experience that has the potential to warp your mind of what you previously thought was possible from a motorcycle. It looks sexy, goes like stink and redefines the term high-tech.

But, like every electric motorcycle we’ve sampled, the price tag will give pause to any prospective buyer. The Ego’s $34k MSRP could buy a sweet petrol-powered motorcycle – or five mediocre ones – that can be refueled in minutes at locations scattered on street corners all across the country.

“It’s a great bike, but I don’t think it fits what I’m looking for,” Schoenewald said, adding its price, heaviness and range limitations rule it out of consideration. “I’m just not ready for it.”

2012 Lightning Motorcycles Exclusive First Ride + Video

The development of electric motorcycles is blossoming into some really exciting forms, such as this wonderful Ego. But the e-bike bugaboo issues of range and price assure they remain a niche market, at least at present. The Ego earns high marks in every category of our scorecard but Value, where its finite range is factored in with its eye-squinting price.

The Ego’s allure is sure to be strong among those with deep pockets and extra motorcycles in their garage, but the Italian superbike is out of practical reach for the proletariat.

More information can be found at http://www.energicasuperbike.com/

Irony dispensed here

Irony dispensed here

+ Highs

  • Immaculate throttle response and control
  • Power whenever and wherever
  • Extremely high level of exotica
- Sighs

  • Price tag looks like a W-2 form
  • Range anxiety
  • Tips scales too heavily
2015 Energica Ego Specifications
Motor Oil-cooled, permanent-magnet AC
Horsepower 100kW (134 hp) from 4900 rpm to 10,500 rpm
Torque 195 Nm (144 ft-lb) from 0 to 4700 rpm
Transmission Single speed, with reverse
Final drive #525 o-ring chain
Frame Tubular trellis
Front suspension Fully adjustable Marzocchi 43mm inverted fork (Ohlins 43mm inverted fork on Ego 45)
Rear suspension Fully adjustable Ohlins single shock
Front brakes Brembo 4-piston radial-mount monoblock calipers; 330mm dual discs
Rear brake Brembo 2-piston caliper, single 240mm disc
Front tire 120/70-17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso
Rear tire 180/55-17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso
Seat height 31.9 inches
Curb weight 584 lbs
Rake 23.5 degrees
Trail 100mm
Wheelbase 57.9 inches
Fuel capacity 11.7 kW/h battery
Electronics Ride modes, regenerative braking, ABS
Colors Matte White or Matte Pearl White
MSRP $34,000; $68,000 for Ego 45 Limited Edition

2015 Energica Ego Second-Ride Review + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Fundy Adventure Rally registration closing
Fundy Adventure Rally registration closing [message #5670] Fri, 25 July 2014 12:41
Anonymous

Registration for the Fundy Adventure Rally closes on 28th July at noon!

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 Topic: Top 10 Things Jeremy Toye Needed to Win the 2014 Pikes Peak Hillclimb
Top 10 Things Jeremy Toye Needed to Win the 2014 Pikes Peak Hillclimb [message #5656] Fri, 25 July 2014 11:57
Anonymous

072414-top-10-toye-pikes-peak-00000-f

Big-time MO congratulations to our favorite San Diegan racer Jeremy Toye, who celebrated the Kawasaki Ninja’s 30th anniversary in style by riding a ZX-10R (actually two ZX-10Rs) to victory in this year’s Pikes Peak International Hillclimb.

In his first attempt, JT became just the third motorcyclist to make the 5000-foot 156-turn 12.4-mile ascent in under 10 minutes (9:58.69), and was named Rookie of the Year and King of the Mountain for doing it. While JT’s other career highlights include some impressive AMA finishes, a third at the Macau GP, and the fastest newcomer lap at the 2006 Isle of Man TT, we’ll always remember him as that crazy fast guy from the old Willow Springs Motorcycle Club, who won two Toyota 200s at $50K each. Here, in his own inimitable words, are the Top 10 things that made Pikes Peak possible.

Top 10 Things Jeremy Toye Needed to Win the 2014 Pikes Peak Hillclimb appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Review: Arai Pro Shade visor system
Review: Arai Pro Shade visor system [message #5669] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:35
Anonymous

Mr. Tate tries out Arai's new external sun visor on his helmet collection.

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 Topic: Nicky Hayden to miss Indianapolis, Brno races
Nicky Hayden to miss Indianapolis, Brno races [message #5668] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:32
Anonymous

Leon Camier will fill rider's seat as he recovers from surgery.

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 Topic: Aerostich releases 2014 catalogue
Aerostich releases 2014 catalogue [message #5667] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:23
Anonymous

The good folks at Duluth, Minnesota, have included more custom options than ever in new catalogue.

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 Topic: Video: Stories of Bike
Video: Stories of Bike [message #5666] Fri, 25 July 2014 06:44
Anonymous

Videos about Australian riders celebrate everyday motorcyclists.

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 Topic: Friday Fudge
Friday Fudge [message #5665] Fri, 25 July 2014 05:21
Anonymous

This week: Someone goes riding in a land down under the Carleton University campus.

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 Topic: Nicky Hayden Will Miss Next Two Races Following Recent Wrist Surgery (News)
Nicky Hayden Will Miss Next Two Races Following Recent Wrist Surgery (News) [message #5655] Thu, 24 July 2014 22:39
Anonymous
Nicky Hayden (Honda) always looks forward to the Indianapolis MotoGP round, and considers it his “home” race. This year, however, Hayden will be a spectator, rather than a participant. He underwent yet another surgery on his troublesome wrist in San Diego on July 17, and will sit out not only the Indy round on August […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Kevin Schwantz To Serve As Embassador For AIMExpo
Kevin Schwantz To Serve As Embassador For AIMExpo [message #5651] Thu, 24 July 2014 13:09
Anonymous

The American International Motorcycle Expo (AIMExpo) has announces that 1993 500cc GP champ Kevin Schwantz is the 2014 “AIMExpo Champion.” Schwantz will play an integral role in pre-event publicity and promotion, will be a focal point of several of AIMExpo’s festivities, and will share his stories and experience with attendees.

“I feel truly honored to be selected as this year’s ‘AIMExpo Champion,’” says Schwantz. “This event has completely changed the landscape of the motorcycle industry and provided a much needed jolt of energy for the business in North America. I’m also excited about the opportunity to join such an impressive gathering of motorcycle enthusiasts.”

Throughout his illustrious career, Schwantz rode for Suzuki, helping the now iconic brand rise to the prominence it enjoys in racing. The longstanding relationship between Schwantz and Suzuki has become most notable in recent months following the official announcement that the Houston-born rider would continue his pursuit of the one crown jewel that has eluded him, a Suzuka 8 Hours win, at the age of 50. The race is Sunday, July 27th (although with the time difference, July 26th in North America).

“The fact that Kevin still has that desire to go out there and give it his all adds to his legacy,” says Larry Little, Vice President and General Manager of AIMExpo. “He’s genuinely a true racer at heart - he lives and breathes motorcycling. It makes him a perfect fit for ‘AIMExpo Champion’.” Follow Kevin’s Suzuka exploits by Liking his Facebook Page Kevin-Schwantz-Official, on Twitter@KevinSchwantz and Instagram @kschwantz34.

 For more information about AIMExpo check out the show’s website AIMExpoUSA.com.

Kevin Schwantz To Serve As Embassador For AIMExpo appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Middleweight Sport-Touring Shootout – Caponord Vs Multistrada Vs Ninja
Middleweight Sport-Touring Shootout – Caponord Vs Multistrada Vs Ninja [message #5650] Thu, 24 July 2014 12:49
Anonymous

Suzuki Burgman 200

According to my weather app, it was officially 100 degrees at 10pm the night we rode in to Borrego Springs, CA, during our Middleweight Sport-Touring Shootout. I’m sitting poolside sipping a tasty, cold beverage while bossmen, Kevin Duke and Sean Alexander, discuss the finer points of gun control in the parking lot.

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Thankfully, we’re not aboard those overweight rigs from our recent Heavyweight Sport-Touring Shootout; the wind protection from those two-wheel barn doors would have had us dead from heat exhaustion before reaching the bottom of Montezuma Grade. These three lighter, sportier, sport-tourers are much better suited to aggressive riding in hot climes. And although two bikes in this test are quasi sport-adventure-tourers, they’re still a heap load more fun in the tight stuff. Well, at least two of the three are.

Click here for the full gallery and specs

Aprilia’s recently launched Caponord and its bevy of electronic aids have garnered much attention – some good, some not so good. MO’s, Troy Siahaan wrote a very complimentary review of the Caponord following the bike’s press launch a few months ago. But now, in the harsh reality of judgement among its peers, the Caponord’s weak points become more apparent.

In the context of this group, the Capo is the comfy, more touringish bike, similar to how we rated the Triumph Trophy in our Heavyweight Sport-Touring Shootout.

In the context of this group, the Capo is the comfy, more touringish bike, similar to how we rated the Triumph Trophy in our Heavyweight Sport-Touring Shootout.

Aprilia Dynamic Damping, an unwisely chosen acronym of ADD – as in attention deficit disorder, by which we mean to say: “Hey, Aprilia suspension, quit yer daydreaming, I’m going fast now, would you please stiffen up.” But it pays no heed when ridden aggressively on bumpy roads, marshmallowing along, occasionally bottoming out and performing with a general sense of wallow.

“When ridden quickly in the twisties, the Aprilia starts sending nauseating warning messages early and often,” says Alexander. A statement to which Duke agrees, saying, “It feels less buttoned-down while cornering in the full-auto ADD mode than I’d like. In terms of front-end feedback and rider confidence at a fast pace, the uncertain-feeling Capo rates a distant third.”

The Ducati Twin throbs at 80 mph/4,500 rpm in top-gear. Its handling demands you keep pressure on the inside bar through sweeping corners. Short legs beware, the Multi’s seat is claimed to be 33.5 inches from the ground and feels even taller.

The Ducati Twin throbs at 80 mph/4,500 rpm in top-gear. Its handling demands you keep pressure on the inside bar through sweeping corners. Short legs beware, the Multi’s seat is claimed to be 33.5 inches from the ground and feels even taller.

In completely opposite land resides Ducati’s Skyhook suspension. The Touring S manages composure whether you’re riding slow and vertical or fast and leaned – automatically tightening and loosening damping settings depending on conditions and riding modes.

“The Multi’s stiffness and rigidity stands in sharp contrast to the Caponord’s plushness, whether referring to the suspension, chassis, seat or the way it makes your private parts feel,” quips Duke.

One of the biggest differences between the Ducati’s semi-active Skyhook suspension and the Caponord’s active/semi-active ADD is the Aprilia’s ability to automatically adjust the preload of its shock. There exists numerous other ways in which the two systems differ, and the ADD may be more advanced in its functionality compared to Ducati’s Skyhook, but whether due to overly soft springs, incorrect damping settings or a combination thereof, we believe Aprilia needs to better refine its ADD system.

“I had a scare while running deep into a bumpy, downhill corner with ADD set in its full-auto mode,” says Duke. “The system seemed to dial up an excess of front compression damping in an attempt to keep the chassis level, causing a front-end chatter that unexpectedly released grip from the front tire.”

How did the Kawi get into a brawl with two sport-adventure-tourers? Our shootout requirements demanded hard luggage and chain drive. Honda’s new Interceptor was meant to be included to help balance the equation of traditional sport-touring vs sport-adventure-touring, but an example with bags was unavailable at the time of testing.

How did the Kawi get into a brawl with two sport-adventure-tourers? Our shootout requirements demanded hard luggage and chain drive. Honda’s new Interceptor was meant to be included to help balance the equation of traditional sport-touring vs sport-adventure-touring, but an example with bags was unavailable at the time of testing.

Then there’s Kawasaki’s Ninja 1000 and its manually adjustable suspension (lacking only rear compression-damping adjustment), which seems passe next to the active Italian dampers. However, it works better and with more consistency than the Caponord’s fancy-schmancy ADD. No complaints were logged regarding the Ninja’s suspenders, and it came in a comfortable second in the suspension category of the ScoreCard, which also contributed to the Ninja winning the handling category of the ScoreCard despite feeling a little less nimble than the Italian duo.

“While the Ninja shares a 190mm rear tire width with the Multistrada, the Kawi uses the now-antiquated 50-series profile instead of the Duc’s modern 190/55 size,” says Duke. “This contributes greatly to the Kawi’s relatively sluggish steering response. And yet the Ninja does a nice job at unwinding a twisty road, aided by a wheelbase (56.9 inches) at least three inches shorter than the rangy Italians.”

Even without the massive amounts of leverage provided by the two sport-adventure-tourer’s wide handlebars, a rider can choose exactly where he wants to put the Kawi at any given time, in any given corner. The Ninja remains stable in long sweepers and outperforms its taller, adventurish rivals in higher-speed environments.

The Kawi’s engine is also worthy of mention as it handily out-gunned both the Duc and Capo in top-gear roll-ons, even though its down a few hp and ft-lbs to the Multistrada.

The Capo’s dyno chart draws the ugliest lines of the three, exhibiting peaks and valleys that illustrate its poor fueling and tendency to surge under neutral throttle. Check out the Kawi’s torque curve; It’s not often you see a 1000cc inline-Four with more torque than a 1200cc Twin.

The Capo’s dyno chart draws the ugliest lines of the three, exhibiting peaks and valleys that illustrate its poor fueling and tendency to surge under neutral throttle. Check out the Kawi’s torque curve; It’s not often you see a 1000cc inline-Four with more torque than a 1200cc Twin.

“Even though it isn’t as torquey as the Multistrada, the Ninja 1000 easily and decisively walks-away from both the Aprilia and Ducati in any contest of acceleration,” says Alexander.

Considering the two Italians share engine architecture, the Twin in each exhibits astoundingly different characteristics. Where the Testastretta 11° L-Twin launches from a standing start with gobs of low-end grunt, the majority of the Aprilia’s power resides high in the rev range of its 90-degree Twin. The Capo also suffers from a surprisingly glitchy EFI and R-b-W.

Kawasaki Ninja 1000
+ Highs

  • Least expensive
  • Sportbike with bags
  • Roll-on champ
- Sighs

  • Relatively tight legroom
  • Expensive bags and extra-cost centerstand
  • Outdated rear tire size

“The R-b-W tuning feels a little unnatural,” says Duke. “Throttle response feels linear over the first 70% of twisting its grip, but its full corral of horses is unleashed only after twisting it further along its lengthy rotation. There’s also a surging condition at small throttle openings.”

But, for those less inclined to ride at higher speeds and steeper lean angles, the softer Caponord could be the better choice as the only model here with cruise control (albeit a rudimentary system) and the greatest amount of wind protection. The Aprilia was also best outfitted for the passenger accommodations.

“The passenger seat is narrower than the Duc’s, but reasonably thick padding is accommodating to a posterior,” says Duke. “A raised forward end of the saddle inhibits sliding forward during braking. The top case includes a backrest pad, which greatly adds to a feeling of security for passengers.”

Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring
+ Highs

  • Super sporty
  • Open ergos
  • Thrilling engine
- Sighs

  • Price
  • Lofty seat height
  • Gearbox imprecision

For the rider, the two sport-adventurers, with their relaxed rider triangles, longer wheelbases and lengthy suspension travel, have an unfair advantage over the Ninja. But for a traditional sport-tourer packing the performance the Ninja does, it’s a relatively comfortable mount upon which to spend the day. “Its bars and ergonomic triangle fall roughly halfway between a real supersport and a traditional sport-tourer,” says Alexander.

At 32.3 inches the Ninja has the lowest seat height by nearly an inch compared to the Capo and more than an inch on the Ducati. It’s narrow passenger seat, however, offers the least amount of pillion comfort of the three.

Aprilia Caponord 1200
+ Highs

  • Best comfort
  • Two-up champ
  • Strong value
- Sighs

  • Too squishy
  • Too heavy
  • ADD needs further development

By virtue of its 40-liter top case ($399.95 option) the Aprilia easily provides the greatest amount of storage capacity: 98 liters total vs. the Duc’s 58 liters vs. the Ninja’s 56 liters, according to each manufacturer’s claims. While the Capo’s top case will fit a full-face helmet, its saddlebags will not, whereas either of the Ninja’s saddlebags will swallow a full-face. A helmet will fit the Multi’s left bag, but the right bag will not due to the cut-out for exhaust heat which drastically reduces the bag’s capacity.

As noted in our initial review of the Ninja 1000, the bike’s hard saddlebag kit lists for $1,269.75. There’s also a choice of a 39-liter top case ($139.95), but due to different mounting hardware, the saddlebags and top case cannot be attached simultaneously. If more carrying capacity is needed, there’s a wide selection of soft luggage available from Kawasaki specifically designed for the Ninja 1000.

Egad! At 599 pounds wet, the Caponord is almost deserving of a place in our Heavyweight Sport-Touring Shootout. The Aprilia is, in fact, closer to the weight of the Yamaha FJR1300ES (644 lbs) than it is to the Multistrada’s 543 lbs. It’s heated grips are a $200 option, the Duc’s are included in the price.

Egad! At 599 pounds wet, the Caponord is almost deserving of a place in our Heavyweight Sport-Touring Shootout. The Aprilia is, in fact, closer to the weight of the Yamaha FJR1300ES (644 lbs) than it is to the Multistrada’s 543 lbs. Its heated grips are a $200 option, the Duc’s are included in the price.

In the end, it turned out that all the technology couldn’t keep the Duc or the Capo in front of the Kawasaki on the ScoreCard. Factoring in the objective scores of price and weight, the more analog bike has enough of an advantage to claim victory over the pricey Multistrada, the bike that each editor scored as the subjective winner.

The Caponord, while a fantastic bargain considering its arsenal of electronics and the only bike here with cruise control, couldn’t overcome the shortcomings of its ADD suspension system, unrefined EFI and R-b-W, and it’s quirky handling manners. You have the option of choosing the non-ADD mode such as solo rider, solo rider with luggage, two-up and two-up with luggage, and Aprilia says that for fast canyon riding the stiffest setting (two-up with luggage) is the preferred choice. However, we tried that and didn’t notice a significant improvement in suspension performance.

The desert yeti on sentry duty. The Kawi’s 1,053cc inline-Four feels like a large electric motor and pulls hard just about everywhere on the tach, especially in the midrange. At 80 mph, the Duc's engine is spinning at 4500 rpm, 1000 revs lower than the Ninja. When powered on, the Capo’s cruise control indicator lamp flashes green which is annoying and easily confused with the turn-signal indicator. When activated it turns solid green.

The desert yeti on sentry duty. The Kawi’s 1,053cc inline-Four feels like a large electric motor and pulls hard just about everywhere on the tach, especially in the midrange. At 80 mph, the Duc’s engine is spinning at 4500 rpm, 1000 revs lower than the Ninja. When powered on, the Capo’s cruise control indicator lamp flashes green which is annoying and easily confused with the turn-signal indicator. When activated it turns solid green.

“What a shame,” says Alexander. “That squishy electronic suspension costs significant dough, raising the Caponord’s base MSRP. If our test bike was available with old-school twisty-knob adjusters, it would quite likely make a fantastic sport-touring motorcycle and might have been priced near to the saddlebag-equipped Ninja.”

The Ninja isn’t perfect, exhibiting a high-frequency buzz in the upper rev-range in various gears (thankfully not at freeway cruising speeds), but the way in which it goes about its duties without the influence of electronic suspension for a far more attainable price tag makes it the winner of this shootout.

It was a close finish: 86.04% Kawi vs 85.37% Duc, but, simply put, the Multi didn’t perform $5,500 better than the Ninja.

It was a close finish: 86.04% Kawi vs 85.37% Duc, but, simply put, the Multi didn’t perform $5,500 better than the Ninja.

Alexander relates; “At the end of our first day’s ride it was time for one last rotation before making the final slog to our arid desert hotel. I thought it was my turn on the Kawasaki and I began to quietly fret… until I realized it was actually my turn on the Aprilia. Near the end of that last leg of our route we followed S-22 down almost 4,000 feet of elevation via a sublime series of high-speed sweepers before dropping us into the furnace of Borrego Springs. In hindsight, I would have chosen the Kawasaki’s relatively cramped ergonomics in exchange for its superior ground clearance, suspension composure, and thrust during the ride down those last few miles.”

“Discovered by the Germans in 1904, they named it San Diego, which of course, in German means a whale's vagina.” – Ron Burgundy

“Discovered by the Germans in 1904, they named it Saan Deeahgo, which of course, in German means a whale’s vagina.” – Ron Burgundy

2014 Middleweight Sport-Touring Shootout Scorecard
Category Aprilia Caponord 1200
ABS Travel Pack
Ducati Multistrada 1200
S Touring
Kawasaki Ninja 1000
Price 67.5% 0.0% 100.0%
Weight 60.0% 95.0% 100.0%
Engine 83.3% 92.1% 90.8%
Transmission/Clutch 89.2% 71.7% 91.7%
Handling 68.3% 87.5% 91.7%
Brakes 81.7% 95.0% 87.5%
Suspension 53.3% 96.7% 87.5%
Technologies 89.2% 90.0% 70.0%
Instruments 76.7% 72.5% 86.7%
Ergonomics/Comfort 91.7% 85.0% 75.8%
Luggage/Storage 89.2% 78.3% 85.0%
Appearance 79.2% 90.8% 88.3%
Cool Factor 76.7% 90.8% 81.7%
Grin Factor 60.0% 92.5% 81.7%
Overall Score 77.9% 85.4% 86.0%
Price and weight are scored based on objective metrics. Other scores are listed as a percentage of editors’ ratings in each category. The Engine category is double-weighted, so the Overall Score is not a total of the displayed percentages but, rather, a percentage of the weighted aggregate raw score.

Middleweight Sport-Touring Shootout – Caponord Vs Multistrada Vs Ninja appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Kevin Schwantz’s busy summer
Kevin Schwantz’s busy summer [message #5654] Thu, 24 July 2014 08:30
Anonymous

Former MotoGP racer to run Suzuka 8 Hour, then take a trip back through time.

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 Topic: Spy shot, video: Ducati Scrambler
Spy shot, video: Ducati Scrambler [message #5653] Thu, 24 July 2014 07:41
Anonymous

Ducati decides to tease us with their new Scrambler via claymation.

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 Topic: Gear up your Grom: Woodcraft brings out new accessories
Gear up your Grom: Woodcraft brings out new accessories [message #5652] Thu, 24 July 2014 07:09
Anonymous

If you want to race your Grom, Woodcraft can help.

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 Topic: MD First Ride: 2014 Suzuki Burgman 200 (Bike Reports) (News)
MD First Ride: 2014 Suzuki Burgman 200 (Bike Reports) (News) [message #5647] Wed, 23 July 2014 21:44
Anonymous
What’s the perfect two-wheeled vehicle? No way it could be a lowly scooter, right? Well, judging from the rants posted by our wise and noble readers, it’s inexpensive, light, low to the ground, handles admirably, seats two comfortably, gets stellar fuel economy, offers good wind protection, plenty of locking storage for touring and has a […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Arrow Exhausts Introduces 2014 Yamaha FZ-07 Fitments
Arrow Exhausts Introduces 2014 Yamaha FZ-07 Fitments [message #5641] Wed, 23 July 2014 18:43
Anonymous

New fitments from Arrow exhaust are now available from SpeedMob, Inc. for the 2014 Yamaha FZ-07. The new exhaust applications include Arrow Street Thunder and X-Kone silencers, both of which are designed to work in conjunction with a full stainless steel racing collector (headers), much the same as Arrow’s 2014 FZ-09 fitments. The Arrow exhaust brand is now being distributed to the US and Canada through SpeedMob, Inc. – a premium brand distributor headed by former LeoVince USA President Tim Calhoun.

 

Arrow FZ-07 exhaust 2

Arrow Street Thunder
Smaller profile stock exhaust systems are becoming more and more popular on newer model bikes, so naturally the want for after market exhausts of similar size and style are also in high demand. To meet this demand, Arrow has developed its “Street Thunder” silencer (based on the core
 design of its smaller off-road product line) to be one of the best looking and working silencers on the market.

This design features a compact silencer with a diamond shaped outer body and it is engineered to combine great design with leading age material technology. In order to manage the heat and sound issues related to a silencer with reduced interior volume, extensive research was conducted to find the optimal sound absorbent and thermal insulating materials; this was also key for Arrow to be able to utilize these materials easily in the production process.

For the 2014 Yamaha FZ-07, Arrow is proud to introduce the Street Thunder exhaust, a perfectly engineered balance of power and sound with a minimal profile. This silencer is available in your choice of Titanium, Aluminum, “Dark” Aluminum or Carbon Fiber. The uniquely designed end-caps are available in either Stainless Steel or Carbon Fiber. The Arrow Street Thunder Silencer also includes a removable baffle (dB killer) for optimal sound control.

Arrow FZ-07 exhaust 1

Arrow X-Kone
One of Arrow’s newest exhaust designs, the X-Kone was originally developed to be u
sed only in “competition” as “competition full titanium” full systems for racing and track day use. These are now being made available for a wider range of Sportbikes, naked bikes and more. Depending on the specific applications, X-Kone silencers can either be fitted to original pipes with a link pipe or, in the case of the FZ-07, it must be used in conjunction with a stainless steel collector (headers). The X-Kone silencers are typically secured by mounting it to the footrest through a bracket that is welded on the silencer body. The average weight of an X-Kone silencer is around 2.2 kg (or 4.85 lb), which usually offers a 30%-40% reduction in weight compared to stock silencers.

Because this is a full race system (headers and silencer), the power and torque output is noticeably improved. More importantly, fitting an X-Kone system does not require riders to change the ECU settings nor add an ECU module; however, a check on CO levels after installation is recommended. The silencer’s internal components are constructed of stainless steel, allowing for reduced weight and a small overall design with exceptional noise reduction by absorption. For the 2014 Yamaha FZ-07, X-Kone silencers sleeves are offered in NiChrome (stainless steel alloy) with a satin finish and the end-caps are made of Carbon Fiber. A removable baffle (dB killer) is also available for optimal sound control.

See the chart below for different FZ-07 fitment options.

Arrow FZ-07 exhaust options

For more information or to place an order, please contact SpeedMob at (510) 232-4040 or email sales@speedmob.com.

Arrow Exhausts Introduces 2014 Yamaha FZ-07 Fitments appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Harley-Davidson Launches Denim Line For Men
Harley-Davidson Launches Denim Line For Men [message #5640] Wed, 23 July 2014 17:28
Anonymous

Harley-Davidson has just released new denim styles to supplement the existing line of jeans offered as part of its Harley-Davidson MotorClothes collection. The two new styles offer a variety of washes, waist size and inseam. Highlights include a slimmer fit, darker washes and features developed specifically for riding.

The new men’s Modern Straight Jeans ($60) are constructed from 13.2-oz., 100 percent cotton denim in the classic five-pocket style. Moto-friendly features include new rivetless pockets that prevent unwanted scuffs to motorcycle seats, while new back pockets are more durable and less likely to tear. Longer belt loops feature doubled material for increased durability and to accommodate wider belts, and the V-shaped center back loop prevents belts from creeping above the waistband. The left-side coin pocket adds riding convenience with left-hand accessibility. The Modern Straight cut offers straight legs, a slight taper to the ankle and a fit that sits just below the natural waist. Available at most H-D dealerships and at www.h-d.com/store in Light or Dark Indigo with slight distressing, in waist sizes 32-40 in. with 30, 32 or 34-in. inseams.

From the Black Label line, the new men’s Slim Straight Denim Jeans ($60) offer 54 percent percent cotton/46 percent polyester 12.75 oz. premium denim construction. Cut slim through the seat and thighs, with a straight leg and a slightly lower rise to the waist, these jeans match modern style with a five-pocket pant. The rivetless pocket design means no unwanted impacts to motorcycle seats, while a left-side coin pocket is a nod to their motorcycle heritage. They are available at most H-D dealerships and at www.h-d.com/store in waist sizes 30-38 in. with 30 and 34-in. inseams.

While these new jeans are no doubt stylish, they appear to be designed for riders who are looking for low-cost clothing with the H-D brand, perhaps someone who is not particularly concerned about technical gear with crash and/or abrasion protection.

MO would love to see Harley offer a stylish American-made jean with reinforced Kevlar stitching and some Kevlar or leather backing in the knees and buttocks.  What do you think? Would their lack of armor or abrasion-resistant material prevent you from buying a pair?

Harley-Davidson Launches Denim Line For Men appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Built For Speed Art Exhibit To Be Displayed At Sturgis Buffalo Chip
Built For Speed Art Exhibit To Be Displayed At Sturgis Buffalo Chip [message #5639] Wed, 23 July 2014 14:45
Anonymous

“Built for Speed – Race Inspired Motorcycles and Art” is the title of Michael Lichter’s 14th annual “Motorcycles as Art” exhibition in Sturgis this August, which for the second year in a row, will be jointly curated by Michael and Paul d’Orleans of the Vintagent. ‘Built for Speed’ is sure to impress visitors with a beautiful and thought-provoking display of motorcycles and related art, the race-inspired theme making connections between motorcycle racing and custom bike designs inspired by racers.

Each custom bike in ‘Built for Speed’ reflects a branch of racing; Speedway, Flat Track, Drag Racing, Board Track,  Grand Prix, Land Speed Record, and will be displayed beside the racing machines suggesting the origins of each style. On the walls surrounding these awesome bike will be race-themed painting, photography, helmets and prints by artists equally inspired by competition motorcycles in action.

The 32-motorcycles in ‘Built for Speed’ include customs by long established and emerging builders, side by side with factory-loaned machines. Builder sending bikes include Alan Stulberg (Revival Cycles), Arlen Ness, Bill Dodge (Blings Cycles), Bill Rodencal (Fat Dog Racing), Brandon Holstein (Brawny Built), Brian Klock (Klockwerks), Dan “Bacon” Carr (DC Choppers), Dan Rognsvoog with Skip Schulze, Jason Paul Michaels (Dime City Cycles), John Reed, Kenji “Ken” Nagai (Ken’s Factory, Japan), Kevin Baas (Baas Metal Craft), Kirk Taylor (Custom Design Studios), Matt Olsen (Carl’s Cycle), Michael O’Shea (Medaza Cycles, Ireland), Nate Jacobs (Harlot Cycles), Pat Patterson (Led Sled Customs), Paul Cox (Paul Cox Industries), Paul Wideman (Bare Knuckle Choppers), Roland Sands (RSD), Skeeter Todd, Tator Gilmore, Warren Lane  and Zach Ness (Arlen Ness, Inc). Factory-built machines include a custom Street 750 from the Harley-Davidson design department, Indian’s “Spirit of Munro” Jeb Scolman built streamliner and a Land Speed Racer from Confederate Motorcycles alongside Icon’s “Iron Lung” road racer, George Smith’s “Tramp” (replica) from S&S, Deus Ex Machina’s “DAKDAAK” Honda CRF 450X and Clem Johnson’s original Vincent “Barn Job” from John Stein. Artists on the walls include Conrad Leach, Darren McKeag, David Uhl, Eric Hermann, Harpoon, Jeff Nobles, Marc Lacourciere, Michael Lichter, Richie Pan, Scott Jacobs, Scott Takes, Susan McLaughlin and Paul d’Orléans, Tom Fritz, Trish Horstman and an all new “21 Helmets” display of race inspired Bell Helmets from SeeSee Motor-Coffee in Portland.

Customized motorcycles have often taken inspiration from racing machines, as witnessed in the ‘Cut-downs’ of the 1920s, ‘Bob-jobs’ of the 1930s, Café Racers of the 1950s, ‘Drag-bike’ choppers of the 1960s, and ‘Street Trackers’ of the 1970s. All of these styles are hugely popular with customizers today, which speaks to the enduring appeal of a racing motorcycle’s purity of purpose in its design. It’s a subject the ‘Motorcycle as Art’ exhibit explored last year in our ‘Ton Up!’ show about café racers and related customs (which became a book – ‘Café Racers’, published by Motorbooks), and this year Michael Lichter and Paul d’Orleans widen the scope of the exhibit to include even more branches of racing, and the beautifully crafted custom bikes taking inspiration from the types of original racers on display.

As always, entry to the Buffalo Chip’s 7,000′ purpose-built Michael Lichter art gallery is FREE and this year, hours have been extended, now opening at 10:30 am into the evening concert hours. The show opens on Saturday August 2 and closes Friday night August 9. To find the gallery, head to the Buffalo Chip and turn east on Alkali Road; go to the east entrance. The gallery is next to the east entrance and does not require a ticket to enter.

Be sure to also visit other displays in the Russ Brown Events Center (also with free admission) including the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum, which will have a “Women in motorcycling” display featuring women that have never been shown by the museum before, artist Marc Lacourciere with a display in his gallery of his latest works of art and an display of miniature paintings from industry notables for an auction to benefit Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that has been organized by Elisa Seeger of Indian Larry Motorcycles and the Aidan Jack Seeger Foundation.
For more information, visit www.buffalochip.com.

See below for a sample of what you will see at the exhibit:

470 471 472 475 474 473 476 478 481 480 479 482 483 484 487 486 485

Built For Speed Art Exhibit To Be Displayed At Sturgis Buffalo Chip appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Kevin Schwantz To Race Goodwood Aboard Norton Featherbed
Kevin Schwantz To Race Goodwood Aboard Norton Featherbed [message #5638] Wed, 23 July 2014 13:27
Anonymous

If you didn’t already notice, Kevin Schwantz has a full plate this year. At 50 years young, the 1993 500cc World Champion will be competing at the prestigious Suzuka 8-Hours in a few weeks, and he’s followed that up with the announcement he will be making his Goodwood Revival debut during the September 12-14 event on an iconic Manx Norton ‘Featherbed’.

Schwantz, last raced on UK soil during the 1994 British 500cc Grand Prix at Donington Park, but will tackle the daunting Goodwood Motor Circuit this year in the Barry Sheene Memorial Trophy, which will be run for bikes of 1951-54 period.

The American will race the only remaining example of the 1950 Norton Works 500 ‘Featherbed’, a bike on which Geoff Duke dominated the Isle of Man TT during that season, and which has not been seen in public for 64 years. The ‘Featherbed’ is owned by Peter Bloore and is being prepared by Ken McIntosh.

While Schwantz has never contested the Revival before, he has been a visitor to Goodwood previously and wowed crowds at the 2013 Festival of Speed after taking to the fabled 1.16- mile Hillclimb on his title-winning Suzuki RGV500.

Schwantz was elevated to grand prix racing in late 1986 and spent eight full years at the highest level. During a 103-race career he won 25 grands prix, finished on the podium 51 times, started from pole position on 29 occasions and set 26 fastest laps.

Kevin Schwantz said: “I’m excited to be taking part in the Goodwood Revival and riding not only one of the most famous racing motorcycles ever made, but also a machine whose design changed motorcycle racing forever. I’ve never raced at the Revival, but have been to the Festival of Speed and was blown away by what an incredible event it is. The machines, not to mention the legends of motorsports in attendance, and the sheer number of spectators was just amazing. The Goodwood Motor Circuit looks really quick and I am looking forward to racing the Norton 500 ‘Featherbed’ out on the track.”

 

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 Topic: Head Shake – Time and Distance
Head Shake – Time and Distance [message #5637] Wed, 23 July 2014 11:42
Anonymous

It is approximately 666.74 miles between St. Inigoes, Maryland, and Belgrade Lakes, Maine. This is good, I needed those miles.

There are times when you need to think, to figure things out and put things in order. We’ve all heard the metaphors, parables, similes, and whatever about motorcycles being good therapy, largely because it is true. It’s a solo pursuit, just you and a machine, your continued existence on this Earth largely dependent upon what you do. It is concentration which, strangely enough, offers one time to think. And it is satisfying. I needed to do some of that. I needed to think about rather weighty issues like marriage, and the future, and whatnot. I needed perspective.

I once heard, I believe it was Pete Conrad, describe watching Earth rise from his position circling the Moon. That sight, that glance at our little blue spinning marble out there, changed forever how he thought about everything, I needed a little bit of that. There was a small problem though, I couldn’t go to the Moon. I could go to Maine, however, which some days is almost as good.

Sabre

Some people have a therapist, I had a bike.

The initial flight plan called for my best bud Kurtis to go along on his punched out Z-1. He’d never seen Maine, it would be a new experience, he’d have fun, but we had a small problem. We worked at a three-man shop, I had gotten the week off for the trip, but the chances of our manager letting Kurtis off, who was our chief mechanic, were slim to none. So Kurtis resolved to get himself fired through some twisted logic about Maryland’s unemployment compensation law, and he tried, he really applied himself.

In fact he tried so hard that the day before we were to leave he showed up at work with a 12-pack, went down to the shop, elevated his bike stand, drank the 12-pack, and took a nap. Our manager, Mike, asked me, “What’s Kurtis doing?” So I told him.

“He’s taking a nap.”

Mike, our manager and a really good guy, went downstairs, gazed upon a supine Kurtis and an empty 12-pack, and came back upstairs. I asked Mike straight out, “So are you going to fire him?” Mike shook his head, chuckled and told me no. I think he knew what Kurtis was up to, and he also knew he had the best mechanic in town. He wasn’t stupid.

No matter, I was going, I’d fly solo. I could do this trip with my eyes closed, or so I thought. Kurtis broke the news to me that night at Monk’s, a local watering hole near my luxurious single-wide trailer, that he wasn’t going to be able to go. We commiserated, I stayed up way too late, and finally went home.

Dawn came way too early. I had wanted to be on the road before the sun broke the horizon but wasn’t. I snapped the tank bag into place,and took off. Push through, that was my thought, just drive on.

Loon

Loons live in Maine. They are beautiful birds; they also live in Southern Maryland, albeit in a different form.

Well, I got to Annapolis, Maryland, just short of the Bay Bridge, and I felt like death on a stick, it was hotter than hell, my back was killing me, a right wrist I had managed to tear up in the Army was none to happy, and I was sitting there chugging a Gatorade wondering at the wisdom of this whole endeavor. It was resolve time, it was time to get the game face on. Get across that Bay Bridge and we have crossed the Rubicon. Off I go, through the pain-in-the-ass, fumble-for-change-with-your gloves-on tollbooth, the relative sanity of US 301 on the Eastern Shore, and eventually on to I-95.

I had a plan, insofar as I had any plan in those days; I’d stop every hundred miles. The bike needed fuel about that time anyway and it would keep me halfway fresh for the trip. After all, that’s only six stops or so. Six stops sounds pretty good. It sounds a lot better than 666.74 miles on one of the busiest traffic corridors in the United States.

The bike had always been a good companion, and she ran great, and having cleared more interminable tool booths to finally get on the Jersey Turnpike and get dialed for New York City, it happened. I started thinking – the road trip meditation therapy started up, the inner voice kicked in.

Where’s your marriage going? What are you doing? What do you care about? What’s important?

I didn’t have answers right away, I never do, that takes time, and space, and distance. The pace on the Jersey Turnpike always increases in direct correlation to your proximity to New York City. My plan had been to divert and head North to the Tappan Zee Bridge and avoid the city altogether. And then I missed the exit, which put me on the George Washington Bridge at lunchtime, which is a living hell, matched only by the Cross-Bronx Expressway, which looks like a scene out of Mad Max; cars on the shoulder sitting on their axles, all window glass missing, and burnt out. We are, as Hunter S. Thompson would aptly describe, in bat country. You do not want to stop here.

That adrenaline rush sustained me until western Connecticut where sheer necessity determined I get fuel. As luck would have it, the Sunoco station owner was also a Husky aficionado and had several nice dirt bikes in one garage bay. We talked for a bit. I was reassured that humans do actually exist in the region, chugged another Gatorade, and got back on the bike and wicked her back up. Next stop the Mass Turnpike and the outer loop of the Boston beltway.

I actually exhaled somewhere around Waltham, Massachusetts. This is when sanity slowly started to set in. Did we make Portland? We get by Augusta? We got this, after another toll booth or two. And every mile the voice was there, I know how this works. Answers don’t come easily. You have to let them simmer.

Castle

Sanity and a good dose of common sense can be found here. You can catch some nice fish, too. You can also come to your senses. (Photo by Castle Island Camps)

What and who do you love? Do you love school? Do you want to stay with your wife? Do you want to go back in the Army?

Mile upon mile it was slowly untangling itself, this baitcasting backlash in my brain I was picking through. I had wanted to arrive at Castle Island Camps before dark, but because of my late start, I wasn’t going to make it. I hit the toll booth for the Maine Turnpike after dark. By this point I was well past Portland outside Augusta. You could smell the pine and feel the bite of the cold air. What had started off as a steam bath in Southern Maryland was destined to end as a chilly ride in a clear Maine night.

The road was empty, the state troopers were few, and the Honda loved chilly weather; I let her eat. Hearing that Kerker bark and letting her run just felt good, it was the best I felt all day, and worst-case scenario, the only creatures I could hurt would be myself and maybe an errant moose.

Sunset

My version of a think tank, set to the tune of loons calling and coy dogs howling at sunset. (Photo by Castle Island Camps)

I made it to the island. The proprietor, and my old boss, Horatio Castle, had waited up for me. I thought the world of this guy and respected him. Truth be told, he helped raise me, and I had learned a lot from him. This wasn’t a fishing trip like so many times in the past; this was a thinking trip. I asked Horatio for his advice that week, and I listened to it. I grabbed one of the rental boats and parked it out in the south end of the lake and floated for hours reading. We always had a bookshelf in the main house where meals were served. You could take one, and leave one. I grabbed “God Bless you Mr. Rosewater.” It was somehow right on time.

Despite outward appearances, sometimes we don’t have all the answers. We don’t know which way to go, and the future appears uncertain. For those times? Ride, and watch what happens. Your mind will do the rest.


About the Author: Chris Kallfelz is an orphaned Irish Catholic German Jew from a broken home with distinctly Buddhist tendencies. He hasn’t got the sense God gave seafood. Nice women seem to like him on occasion, for which he is eternally thankful, and he wrecks cars, badly, which is why bikes make sense. He doesn’t wreck bikes, unless they are on a track in closed course competition, and then all bets are off. He can hold a reasonable dinner conversation, eats with his mouth closed, and quotes Blaise Pascal when he’s not trying to high-side something for a five-dollar trophy. He’s been educated everywhere, and can ride bikes, commercial airliners and main battle tanks.

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