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 Topic: Gage McAllister, Monte Frank and Johnny Lewis Comprise U.S. Team At Supermoto Of Nations
Gage McAllister, Monte Frank and Johnny Lewis Comprise U.S. Team At Supermoto Of Nations [message #5951] Tue, 26 August 2014 19:14
Anonymous

The American Motorcyclist Association is pleased to announce the U.S. team that will compete at the FIM (Fédération Internationale de Motocylisme) Supermoto of Nations in Cremona, Italy, Oct. 12. The 2014 team will include Gage McAllister, Monte Frank and Johnny Lewis.

Brandon Ward and Eric Stump are alternates and will travel with the team to Cremona.

“Supermoto is a thrilling sport, and we’re excited for its resurgence in America,” said AMA Track Racing Manager Ken Saillant. “Sending riders to compete in the world team championship is another important part of accelerating the growth of U.S. Supermoto.”

Marco Pedde with Supermoto East Coast, which promotes the FIM North America Supermoto Championship Series, will manage the team.

“Supermoto has came a long way in the last few years, and the U.S. Supermoto of Nations team is the result of the hard work of the two AMA-sanctioned Supermoto series,” Pedde said. “Supermoto of Nations will be the great push the sport needs in America to get it back to where it belongs. I am really honored to be the team manager of the first American Supermoto of Nations team.”

Lewis competes in the FIM North America Supermoto Championship Series for Solid Performance KTM/Eyeball Moto.

“It’s been an amazing season racing the FIM North America Supermoto Championship Series so far with nine of 10 moto wins, and to now get the chance to represent the United States at the FIM Supermoto of Nations against the best in the world is going to cap off this awesome season,” said Lewis, who is from Coatesville, Pa. “I’m looking forward to teaming up with the other riders selected and putting in a great effort representing the USA.”

Gage McAllister

McAllister, who is from Lincoln, Calif., and rides for the Intents Racing team, said: “I am honored to be a part of the very first USA Supermoto of Nations team.”

Frank races in the AMA Supermoto National Championship Series for Team M&G Homes/Ajax Kawasaki. He’s second in points with four of six rounds completed.

“I’m pretty honored to be on the team since this is the first year,” said Frank, from Newcastle, Okla. “I’ve been racing Supermoto since 2006, so it’s good to still be around and get the opportunity to do this. The guys over there in Europe are super fast, so we’re looking forward to a great challenge. I’ve been going to Europe to race the last three years now, and everyone seems to take the sport just a bit more seriously over there, while over here in America, we’re still getting back up to speed. They might be a little bit more prepared in that sense, but Supermoto competition in the United States has definitely improved leaps and bounds with the new AMA series this year. We’re starting to get better rider turnout, and there’s a good group of fast guys committed to the series.”

Ward is part of the BW Racing team.

“I am extremely delighted to have the opportunity to be a part of the United States Supermoto of Nations team,” said Ward, from Newport Beach, Calif. “Racing in Europe has been a dream of mine for many years. I had the chance to race alongside the world’s best racers in the Mettet Superbikers last year, and ever since then I have had my eyes set on improving and being able to compete for a top finish alongside guys like Bidart, Hermunen, Lazzarini and the Chareyre brothers. Being selected to be a part of the United States SMoN team as an alternate is an unbelievable honor and if necessary, I will step in and represent the United States to the best of my ability.”

Stump rides for Eyeball Moto.

“Supermoto is coming back, and I am happy to be part of the first official U.S. Supermoto team competing at the FIM Supermoto of Nations,” said Stump, from Levittown, Pa.

Matt Stewart with USA Supermoto, which promotes the AMA Supermoto National Championship Series, and Jay Kliger, with the FIM North America Supermoto Championship Series, will be assistant team managers.

Monte Frank

“Everyone at the AMA Supermoto Championship Series is excited to be working with the Supermoto East Coast Series in sending the first U.S. team to the FIM Supermoto of Nations,” Stewart said. “We look forward to a successful trip and sending a team every year going forward.”

Added Kliger: “For the first time, the USA will have an official team for the FIM Supermoto Of Nations. This has been a goal of ours. To be part of it and to represent the United States on the world stage of Supermoto with a team of such talented riders is a true honor. We appreciate all the support from the AMA and the FIM and look forward to representing the USA in Cremona.”

Competition in the FIM Supermoto of Nations features the S1 class, which includes 175cc-250cc two-stroke motorcycles and 290cc-450cc four-stroke motorcycles.

The United States has never competed in the FIM Supermoto of Nations, which was first held in Bulgaria in 2008. Italy won the event in 2013, with Bulgaria second and France third.

Gage McAllister, Monte Frank and Johnny Lewis Comprise U.S. Team At Supermoto Of Nations appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: 2014 Moto Guzzi Griso 8V SE Review
2014 Moto Guzzi Griso 8V SE Review [message #5950] Tue, 26 August 2014 17:00
Anonymous

2014 Moto Guzzi Griso 8V SE

Editor Score: 78.25%
Engine 16.0/20
Suspension/Handling 12.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 7.5/10
Brakes 7.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.25/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 7.5/10
Appearance/Quality 8.5/10
Desirability 7.5/10
Value 8.0/10
Overall Score78.25/100

Originally launched in 2004, Moto Guzzi’s Griso isn’t new to the scene. The bike’s styling is so uncategorizable and timeless, it looks contemporary whether parked next to a BMW R nineT or KTM Super Duke R. Beauty’s in the eye of the beholder, and whether you love it or leave it, you certainly can’t say it looks dated.

If, like me, you’re enamored with the masculine brutishness of the Griso, there’s a lot of motorcycle to love. Five hundred and fiddy-six soaking wet pounds suspended between 61 inches of contact patches. The Griso’s no flyweight contender. And while it is somewhat ponderous in the canyons, the Griso was never meant to be a sportbike.

Yet, it is suspended like one. A fully adjustable, 43mm inverted fork and monoshock provide fine-tuning suspension adjustments. The components work well enough to maintain composure of the 741 pounds of combined bike and rider weight, even when pushed past their intended performance envelope.

That’s not a rectangular oil cooler haphazardly attached as an afterthought, it’s a hunk of strategically placed industrial art. All in the eye of the beholder, mate.

That’s not a rectangular oil cooler haphazardly attached as an afterthought, it’s a hunk of strategically placed industrial art. All in the eye of the beholder, mate.

First offered as a SOHC, two-valve 1064cc V-Twin, the Griso was later upgraded to an 1151cc four-valve “Quattrovalvole” arrangement, changing the bike’s performance characteristics from sluggish to slugger. But this was circa 2009, and the relatively powerful Twin (95 hp at 7200 rpm & 73 ft-lb at 6400 rpm) is where the majority of the bike’s shortcomings lie.

“The Griso’s most obvious flaw is the tuning of its fuel injection,” says chief speech therapist (“it’s Gootzi”), Kevin Duke. “It’s disappointingly cold-blooded for an EFI-fed motor, and it exhibits an unrefined surging condition at low throttle openings. The imprecise fueling also results in relatively poor fuel economy. It’s due for upgrading.”

These problems would be easily rectified if Guzzi transplanted the 1380cc V-Twin powering the newer California models. The Griso would also gain traction control, ABS and cruise control in this transaction.

Oh, my, god. Becky, look at those pipes! Seven inches in circumference befits the Griso’s brutish persona. The wide seat is comfy for both rider and passenger.

Oh, my, god. Becky, look at those pipes! Seven inches in circumference befits the Griso’s brutish persona. The wide seat is comfy for both rider and passenger.

There’s also some driveline lash through the shaft final drive, probably made more evident by the EFI’s improper fueling, but smooth clutch actuation can mask most of the issue. Brembo front brakes are powerful, but only after a firm, three-finger pull on the lever rather than the usual two-finger squeeze.

So, the Griso has imperfections, or are those charismatic attributes? Nah, they’re definitely zits on the face of an otherwise stalwart mug. The charisma comes in the form of the booming 90-degree V-Twin exhaust note emanating from the over/under turbine-engine styled muffler exits; the back and forth wagging of its handlebars when at idle; the right-side twitch when goosing the throttle; its avant garde styling.

+ Highs

  • More charisma than most motorcycles
  • Sounds as good as it looks
  • Fully adjustable suspension
- Sighs

  • Unrefined EFI fueling
  • Driveline lash
  • No ABS

The Griso ain’t perfect, but it’s a Guzzi, so we knew that going into this review, didn’t we? In no way is this meant to be sexist, but the Griso is – if there ever was – a man’s man kind of a motorcycle. So is the Star VMAX. And, like the VMAX, the larger the man you are, the more the Griso will appeal to you. The footpegs may need some rearranging depending on the length of legs, but if you’re a tall man by way of a long torso, you’re gonna love the Griso.

Bachelor Editor, John Burns, says the Griso’s great for attracting women, but he has low standards, so don’t get your hopes up.

2014 Moto Guzzi Griso 8V SE Specs
MSRP $12,990
Engine Capacity 1151cc
Engine Type Four-stroke V 90 Twin
Horsepower 95.14 @ 7200
Torque 73.16 @ 6400
Bore x Stroke 95 x 81.2 mm
Compression 11:01
Fuel System EFI
Transmission Six-speed
Final Drive Shaft
Frame High tensile steel tubular twin cradle
Front Suspension 43mm fork, spring preload and hydraulic for rebound and compression, 4.7 inches of travel
Rear Suspension Monoshock, spring preload, rebound, compression, 4.3 inches of travel
Front Brakes Dual, four-piston calipers, 320mm discs
Rear Brakes Single caliper, 282mm disc
Front Tire 120/70-17
Rear Tire 180/55-17
Seat Height 31.4 inches
Wheelbase 61 inches
Rake/Trail 26.30º/4.25 inches
Curb Weight 556 pounds
Fuel Capacity 4.4 gal
MPG 31.2 MPG
Colors Black/Silver

2014 Moto Guzzi Griso 8V SE Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Roadgear Offering 25% Off, Through Saturday, August 30
Roadgear Offering 25% Off, Through Saturday, August 30 [message #5949] Tue, 26 August 2014 15:48
Anonymous

If you’ve been waiting for the right time to get yourself some new gear, the time to act is now. Until Saturday, August 30, Roadgear will take 25% off your order if you use coupon code A25L7.

Tailored towards the touring rider (though suitable for everyone), Roadgear has the products you need. From jackets to pants, gloves to boots, Roadgear has you covered from head to toe. Don’t forget to stock up on accessories like rain gear, balaclava’s, scarfs or socks either. The summer riding season will be over sooner than you think.

Of course, Roadgear’s collection goes far beyond riding gear, as the company has a complete line of motorcycle luggage to choose from. Whether your needs are small enough for a backpack, or whether a full compliment of luggage like saddlebags, tail bag and tank bag are what you need, Roadgear has you covered. There are even more accessories at the Roadgear website, including camping gear like sleeping bags and cookware, amongst many others.

For more information, visit the Roadgear website link above and remember to use coupon code A25L7 at checkout. One coupon per customer, cannot be combined with other discounts, and is not valid for close-out, overstock or sale items.

Roadgear Offering 25% Off, Through Saturday, August 30 appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Third Annual ‘The MEET’ at ACM
Third Annual ‘The MEET’ at ACM [message #5948] Tue, 26 August 2014 15:02
Anonymous

More than 2,000 attendees visited America’s Car Museum for its 3rd annual Vintage Motorcycle Festival ‘The MEET’ last weekend in Tacoma, Washington, where over 300 motorcycles and scooters were showcased on the Haub Family Field at LeMay. The event drew pre-1981 motorcycles and scooters from the U.S. and Canada, including an antique motorcycle display, swap meet, cruise-in and a 78-mile roundtrip tour from ACM’s Anderson Plaza to Mt. Rainier.

“This MEET shows just how strong the motorcycle enthusiast community is,” said Burt Richmond, chairman of the Vintage Motorcycle Festival. “We have created a world-class event for riders and their families that grows every year and proves ACM is much more than just another car museum.”

The MEET is one of five annual signature events at the four-story, 165,000 sq. ft. LeMay museum with rotating exhibits museum, including the Pacific Northwest Concours d’Elegance on Sept. 7, the Wheels & Heels Annual Gala, Cars & Cigars and the new “Drive Away the Blues” beach-themed party scheduled for Feb. 2015. More information about the LeMay Museum can be found at www.lemaymuseum.org.

Award Winners:

Hagerty Best of Show – 1969 BMW R695 Sidecar, James Iwase

President’s Award – John and Zeta Smith

Motorcycle Classic’s Editor’s Choice – 1966 Mathless G12 Sidecar, Ron Predmore

Best Unrestored – 1973 Honda CL350, Mike Quinn

Best Use of Hillman Car Motor – Royal Enfield Spl., Peter Dent

Best Metal Flake Paint – 1972 Durat 750 GT, Loren Smith

Best Red Racer Guzzi – Moto Guzzi LeMans, Jim El

Best Brass Polishers’ Nightmare – 1957 BMW, Jonnie Walker

Best Custom Norton Single – 1963 Norton ES2, Allen Gillespie

Classes – Awards

Antique American – Pre-1940

  1. Harley-Davidson J, Robert Johnson
  2. Harley-Davidson J + sidecar, Harold Suhell
  3. Harley-Davidson Knuckle, Peter Maftein

Classic American – Post-WWII

  1. HD LCR, Michael Ruddell
  2. Simple Sevvi-Car, Robert J Johnson

Vintage British – Other

  1. 1951 AJS, Keith Anderson
  2. Matchess G-12, Ron Predmore
  3. 1950 Rapide, Bev Brown

Vintage BSA

  1. 1968 Firebird Scrambler, Sean Curtiss
  2. 1969 Rocket 3, Roger Huntly
  3. 1967 Lightening, Dan Lucas

Vintage Norton

  1. 1961 ES2, Dean Nissen
  2. 1967 Atlas, Gary Richey
  3. 1974 Commando 850, Gary Richey

Vintage Triumph

  1. 1964 Tri TT Special, John Meyer
  2. 1956 Tri T110, Wayne Hamilton
  3. 1970 Tri T120, Ken Morris

Vintage German

  1. 1969 BMW R695, James Iwase
  2. 1967BMW R695, Ken Prasig
  3. DKW RT200, Forrest Tonkins

Vintage Italian

  1. 1973 Ducati 7506T, George Docking
  2. 1978 Ducati 900SD Darmah, Tim O’Mahoney
  3. 1961 Gilera Sport 175, Jack Huisinga

Vintage Japanese – Other

  1. 1972 Modaca Wombar, Howard Fergason
  2. 1966 Mooska Ace 90, Ed Bray

Vintage Honda

  1. 1973 CL350, Mike Quinn
  2. 1961 CS77, Ron Orr
  3. 1970 250, Stu Moss

Vintage Kawasaki

  1. 1973 21, Kevin Iden
  2. 1983 GPZ 305, Frank Shuck
  3. 1982 GPZ 1100, Frank Shuck

Vintage Suzuki

  1. 1967 B105P, Michael Boyle
  2. 1973 RV125, Joe Smith
  3. 1980 GS1000, Mike Benak

Vintage Yamaha

  1. 1972 XS750, Ron Orr
  2. 1978 XS750, Jerry Kesselring
  3. 1979 XS1100, Harlan Smith

Motocross Post-1975

  1. Seige 1975 VA 360 Montesa
  2. 1975 KTM MC5 Seige
  3. 1975 Yamaha YZ250B, Todd King

Best Café Racer

  1. 1978 Moto Guzzi LeMans, Erik Lund
  2. 1978 BMWR80, James Iwase
  3. 1973 Honda, Rodger Huntley

Vintage Competition

  1. 1973 Durat 750, Gary Lewos
  2. 1960 Max Norton, Peter Hagaman
  3. 1956 Indian, Dan Lucas

Custom Bobber/Chopper

  1. 1968 Triumph, John Root
  2. 1949 Harley, Phil Hunter
  3. 1974 Harley, Chog Greninger

Classic Powered Bike/Scooter

  1. 1954 Allstate Phch, Jim Horstman
  2. 1958 Allstate Moped, John Richey
  3. 1971 Lambretta, Jason Freedbrick

 

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 Topic: 2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Lineup Revealed
2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Lineup Revealed [message #5947] Tue, 26 August 2014 14:08
Anonymous

Harley-Davidson revealed its four-model Custom Vehicle Operations lineup for 2015, adding new CVO versions of the Road Glide Ultra and Street Glide to go with the returning CVO Softail Deluxe and CVO Limited. Our own Evans Brasfield is currently in Sonoma, Calif., for Harley-Davidson’s 2015 press launch, and he’ll have full first ride reports later this week. For now, let’s take a look at the CVO models.

Like the CVO Limited, the CVO Road Glide Ultra and CVO Street Glide are powered by the Screamin’ Eagle Twin-Cooled High Output 110 engine which Harley-Davidson claims puts out 115.1 ft-lb. of torque at 3750 rpm. The CVO Softail Deluxe is the only one in the line to use the air-cooled Twin Cam 110B engine which claims 107.7 ft-lb. at 3000 rpm.

082614-2015-harley-davidson-CVO_Family

The CVO Road Glide Ultra offers the updates on the non-CVO Road Glide which returned to Harley’s lineup after a one-year hiatus. The new frame-mounted shark-nosed fairing offers three splitstream vents and a 13.5-inch windshield to help deflect air around the rider. The lower fairings divert air around the rider’s legs while also covering the Twin-Cooled engine’s radiators. Behind the new fairing is the Boom! Box 6.5 GT touchscreen infotainment system and 6.5-inch speakers, part of Harley-Davidson’s Project Rushmore enhancements.

For the CVO version, Harley-Davidson equipped the Road Glide Ultra with a 1.25-inch diameter handlebar that reaches higher and further back than the regular Road Glide’s hand controls.

Other differences include the rider and passenger backrests, heated handgrips and seats, Mirror Chrome Slicer Custom wheels and CVO Carryout Tour-Pak.

The CVO Street Glide also comes with the Boom! Box 6.5 GT infotainment system, pumping audio out of 12 speakers with two 300-watt four-channel amplifiers. The CVO team added custom five-spoke Aggressor wheels, extended saddlebags, a CVO seat, wind splitter windscreen, Daymaker LED headlights and other custom accessories and, of course, a special CVO paint scheme.

082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC7

The 2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide Ultra is priced at $39,649 while the CVO Street Glide comes in at $36,349. The returning CVO Limited is priced at $39,349 while the CVO Softail Deluxe offers the lowest price at $28,999.

2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Road Glide Ultra

082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-road-glide-ultra-15_FLTRUSE_LOC3 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-road-glide-ultra-15_FLTRUSE_LOC1 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-road-glide-ultra-15_FLTRUSE_LOC4 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-road-glide-ultra-15_FLTRUSE_LOC2 2015 CVO Road Glide Ultra 2015 CVO Road Glide Ultra 2014 CVO Road Glide Ultra 2015 CVO Road Glide Ultra 2015 CVO Road Glide Ultra

2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Street Glide

2015 CVO Street Glide 2015 CVO Street Glide 2015 CVO Street Glide 2015 CVO Street Glide 2015 CVO Street Glide 2015 CVO Street Glide 2015 CVO Street Glide 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC1 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC2 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC3 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC4 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC5 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC6 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_LOC7 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET1 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET2 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET3 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET4 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET5 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET7 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET6 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET8 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET9 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET11 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-street-glide-FLHXSE_DET10

2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Limited

2015 CVO Ultra Limited 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_LOC2 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET1 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET2 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET3 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET7 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET6 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET5 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET4 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_DET8 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 2015 CVO Ultra Limited 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-limited-15_FLHTKSE_LOC1

2015 Harley-Davidson CVO Softail Deluxe

2015 CVO Softail Deluxe 2015 CVO Softail Deluxe 2015 CVO Softail Deluxe 2015 CVO Softail Deluxe 2015 CVO Softail Deluxe 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_LOC1 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET1 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET5 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET4 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET3 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET2 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET6 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET7 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET8 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET9 082614-2015-harley-davidson-cvo-softail-deluxe-15_FLSTNSE_DET10

[Source: Harley-Davidson]

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 Topic: 2015 Harley-Davidson Freewheeler Revealed
2015 Harley-Davidson Freewheeler Revealed [message #5946] Tue, 26 August 2014 13:18
Anonymous

It’s no surprise, as we’ve already seen the spy photos and California Air Resources Board documents, but Harley-Davidson has officially introduced its new Freewheeler trike, adding a second three-wheeled model to go with the Tri Glide Ultra Classic.

Whereas the Tri Glide is designed for touring needs, the Freewheeler is more of a cruiser with 12-inch mini-ape-hanger handlebars and bobtail fenders.

2015 Free-WheelerUp front is a seven-piece nacelle with a dual halogen lamp mounted tight to the 49mm telescopic fork and frame. Below the headlight is a slender front fender covering the single 19-inch cast aluminum front wheel. The 12-inch ape hangers bring the hand controls up and closer to the rider, though potential shoppers should check with their state’s restrictions on handlebar height.

At the rear, the Freewheeler has two 15-inch cast aluminum wheels on either side of a low-profile waterproof trunk that Harley-Davidson says offers a 2 cubic-foot capacity and can fit two full-sized helmets.

2015 Trike Free-WheelerThe seat is shaped to position the rider forward to better reach the foot and hand controls while leaving room for a passenger.

The Freewheeler is powered by Harley-Davidson’s 1690cc air-cooled High Output Twin Cam 103 instead of the Tri Glide Ultra’s Twin-Cooled engine. Harley-Davidson says the engine produces 104.7 ft-lb. at 3250 rpm. The fuel tank holds 6 gallons, just as in the Tri Glide, while claimed fuel economy is 39 mpg, an extra mile compared to the Tri Glide (it helps that the Freewheeler’s claimed curb weight of 1082 pounds is 133 pounds lighter).

082614-2015-harley-davidson-freewheeler-FLRT_LOC8

The braking system is linked, with the foot pedal activated both the front and rear brakes. The front brake lever only controls the front brake.

Other features include electronic cruise control, foot-activated parking brake, electric reverse, and a hydraulic Assist and Shift clutch lever.

The 2015 Harley-Davidson Freewheeler will be available in Vivid Black for $24,999. Solid color options raise the price to $25,499.

[Source: Harley-Davidson]

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 Topic: Harley-Davidson Goes Low for 2015
Harley-Davidson Goes Low for 2015 [message #5945] Tue, 26 August 2014 12:26
Anonymous

Harley-Davidson revealed the new 2015 Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low and Ultra Limited Low, offering what it calls the the lowest seat height of any premium touring motorcycle on the market. Designed with riders 5 feet 7 inches and shorter in mind, the two Low models have a seat height of 25.6 inches from the ground, or 1.7 inches lower than the regular models.

The lower seat isn’t the only change to accommodate shorter riders. The primary drive housing and derby cover are narrower than on the regular non-Low models, offering more leg clearance.

082614-2015-harley-davidson-electra-glide-ultra-classic-low-animated

The handlebars are also drawn two inches closer to the rider, offering an easier reach and reducing strain. The handlebar grips are also a smaller diameter to suit smaller hands. Both Low models also come with an Assist and Slip hydraulic clutch to reduce lever pull effort.

Other changes include new passenger footboards that fold away to make it easier to push the motorcycles around and a new toe tab extension on the kickstand to make it easier to retract.

2015 Touring Electra Glide Ultra Limited Low

Otherwise, the two Low models are identical to the Electra Glide Ultra Classic and Ultra Limited, with Project Rushmore enhancements. The Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low is powered by the same High Output Twin-Cam 103 engine as the regular model, claiming 104.7 ft-lb. at 3250 rpm while getting a claimed 47 mpg. The Ultra Classic Low uses the Twin-Cooled engine, claiming 105.5 ft-lb. at 3750 rpm and 42 mpg.

The Ultra Glide Low is priced $900 more than the regular Ultra Glide, starting at $26,999 for the Vivid Black color, $27,599 for solid colors, $28,049 for two-tone color schemes and $28,299 for custom schemes. The Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low models cost $1,150 more than the non-Low version, starting at $24,399 for Vivid Black, $24,999 for solids, $25,449 for two-tones and $25,699 for custom colors.

Evans Brasfield is at Harley-Davidson’s press launch. Check back later in the week for his first impressions on the new 2015 Harley-Davidson models.

[Source: Harley-Davidson]

Harley-Davidson Goes Low for 2015 appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: This weekend in MotoGP: The invasion of Silverstone
This weekend in MotoGP: The invasion of Silverstone [message #5956] Tue, 26 August 2014 12:15
Anonymous

Marquez says the pressure is off, while Crutchlow looks ahead to season's second half.

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 Topic: Harley-Davidson 2015 Models Announced: New Freewheeler Trike and Return of the Road Glide (Bike Reports) (News)
Harley-Davidson 2015 Models Announced: New Freewheeler Trike and Return of the Road Glide (Bike Reports) (News) [message #5957] Tue, 26 August 2014 12:04
Anonymous
Harley-Davidson announced its 2015 model lineup, including a new Freewheeler Trike design (pictured above) and the return of the Road Glide, in both Standard and Special Editions (previously reported on, pictured below). The remaining new models, and model updates, are summarized in the following press release (click on the links for details on specific models): […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Video: Check out the Indian Continental Scout
Video: Check out the Indian Continental Scout [message #5955] Tue, 26 August 2014 10:19
Anonymous

Bike that was also profiled in Bike Exif bucks current custom trend.

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 Topic: Local racer dominates CMDRA action in BC (with photo gallery)
Local racer dominates CMDRA action in BC (with photo gallery) [message #5954] Tue, 26 August 2014 09:49
Anonymous

Burke Foster was the man to beat in Pro Modified in the weekend's Canadian Motorcycle Drag Racing Association action.

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 Topic: Harley-Davidson confirms Freewheeler, other models, for Canada
Harley-Davidson confirms Freewheeler, other models, for Canada [message #5953] Tue, 26 August 2014 08:46
Anonymous

The MoCo is bringing new trike, lowered Electra Glide, to our market.

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 Topic: Rumour: BMW S1000RR getting update
Rumour: BMW S1000RR getting update [message #5952] Tue, 26 August 2014 08:12
Anonymous

Dutch website shows photo of new bodywork.

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 Topic: Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans Review
Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans Review [message #5944] Tue, 26 August 2014 02:00
Anonymous

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans

Editor Score: 88.25%
Aesthetics 8.75/10
Protection 8.75/10
Value 9.0/10
Comfort/Fit 9.0/10
Quality/Design 9.0/10
Weight 9.0/10
Options/Selection 8.75/10
Innovation 8.75/10
Weather Suitability 8.5/10
Desirable/Cool Factor 8.75/10
Overall Score88.25/100

What’s America’s favorite kind of clothing? It would have to be denim blue jeans. Everywhere you go, folks are wearing them. The same could be said about motorcyclists on the street. If they’re covering their legs with something other than a dedicated riding suit, you can expect to see jeans. As comfortable and durable as jeans are, sliding down the interstate at 65 mph dramatically exceeds their job description. Cotton can only provide so much abrasion protection. So, what’s a rider to do? Go through life looking like a transformer, knowing that they’re protected from impact and abrasion but vulnerable to arrest by the style police?

Riding Jeans Shootout: Icon 1000 Rouser Vs. Rev’It Campo

Competition Accessories thinks they have the answer. By taking the company’s experience as one of the premier motorcycle gear retailers, the company designed its own riding jeans under the Sliders name. When looking at a pair of Sliders 4.0 Motorcycle Riding Jeans, the impression is that the designers took everything that made riding jeans suit their job and tried to improve them – all while keeping the price lower than that of the other riding jeans on the market.

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans

They look like regular five pocket jeans – with some extra stitching.

From a distance, Sliders look just like your typical brand-name denim. Only on closer inspection do the additional stitches that hold the Kevlar aramid abrasion panels in place become noticeable. Unlike your typical jeans, 13.5 oz. denim is used throughout for increased durability in a mishap. Competition Accessories claims that their Kevlar panels are larger than those on other, more expensive, riding jeans, and a quick look at the examples we have here at MO supports that claim. The knee panels cover from mid-thigh to about three inches below the knee, while the seat panels go from just below the belt line to a quarter of the way down the thigh. Additional panels wrap around the side of the legs offering sliding protection. The cut is a little on the relaxed side, but that keeps them from looking like you’re wearing motorcycle gear when you’ve got the knee armor installed.

Dainese D6 Denim Riding Jeans Review

Slider 4.0 jeans feature a nylon lining with a pouch to hold the optional knee armor. Even when choosing not to insert the armor, the liner will be appreciated since it slides over bent knees easier than the coarse Kevlar. Inserting the CE approved knee armor couldn’t be easier. Simply turn the jeans inside out and lift the lower edge of the liner away from the denim/Kevlar. Inside the liner, a pocket held closed with hook-and-loop fastener keeps the armor in place. While three positions of adjustability are claimed for the Sliders, in our experience, the range of adjustment is about an inch, at best. Try to place the knee pads too low, and the sole flaw of the Sliders is revealed. Since the pocket faces down, the armor can slip out while riding if you did not leave enough hook-and-loop to hold the pocket closed. Although we never had the armor fall all the way out of the jeans, riding down the road and feeling like something is trying to crawl into your boot is distracting.

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans

In addition to protecting your glutes, Sliders place Kevlar between your thighs and the pavement.

When wearing the Sliders, the heavier denim was noticeable on hot days but wasn’t uncomfortable – particularly when compared to the bulk of full-on riding suits. Otherwise, the jeans felt like Levis or any ore brand-name denim. When walking, the knee armor was almost invisible but could be felt. Folks who prefer more straight-legged jeans will notice that Sliders are a tad looser than they might prefer, but the extra room that hides the armor also makes the legs fit easily over boots. Out on the road, the Sliders’ fit was loose enough to remain comfortable but tight enough to hold the knee armor in place – with none of the rotating armor we’ve experienced with other gear.

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans

The slippery liner keeps the jeans from binding while the armor can be adjusted up and down about an inch.

Overall, our impression of Competition Accessories’ Slider 4.0 jeans was one of high quality construction, comfortable fit, and the same longevity as one would expect from regular jeans. When ordering Sliders, the manufacturer states that the sizes run about 1.5–2.5“ larger than the stated size but says this is ”fairly standard for relaxed or looser fit jeans like Levis 550 or similar styles.” Sliders are available in mens sizes to accommodate 30–44 in. waists and 30–36 in. lengths and are currently priced at a surprisingly low $85.(Compare that to the $180-$270 range in our previously tested riding jeans.) Color options are blue and black. Sliders Bella Womens Riding Jeans, Sliders 4.0 Cargo Motorcycle Riding Pants, and Sliders Khaki 4.0 Motorcycle Riding Pants are also available from Competition Accessories.

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans

Sportbike or cruiser, Sliders are equally at home.

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans

Sliders 4.0 Riding Jeans Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: American Honda Signs Cole Seely To Factory Team
American Honda Signs Cole Seely To Factory Team [message #5935] Mon, 25 August 2014 19:29
Anonymous

American Honda Motor Corp., Inc. announced today that it has signed Cole Seely to its factory supercross/motocross team with a multiyear contract. As a member of the Troy Lee Designs Honda satellite squad, Seely this year finished a close second in the AMA Supercross series’ 250 West title chase and also performed well during three appearances as a substitute rider on Team Muscle Milk in the premier class. Now Seely will campaign a Honda CRF450R alongside Trey Canard in the AMA Supercross and AMA Pro Motocross championships.

“I’m really excited to be with the Honda team,” Seely said. “We’ve worked together in the past, and we have great chemistry together. It’s my dream team, and it’s nice to officially be a part of it now. I really like the CRF450R too, ever since they introduced the new chassis. The geometry is great, and I think I fit it well. I know what I’m getting into, and I think it’s going to come down to preparation during the pre-season and getting the bike dialed in right for when Anaheim 1 comes around. Fortunately, I have a great group of guys to help with that.”

A natural supercross rider with a fluid riding style, Seely has also made progress in the outdoor setting, finishing the 2014 AMA Pro Motocross season well inside the top ten in the 250 points for the first time.

“We’re excited to welcome Cole into Honda’s factory team,” said Ray Conway, Director of Racing at American Honda. “While racing a CRF250R with Troy Lee Designs Honda, he has shown that he is a talented rider, and he performed well at the top level while willingly stepping in to help out our factory team this year. He has a solid base and it’s great that he’ll be staying with Honda as he makes this next important step in his career.”

Cole Seely Bio

Cole Seely’s background as an amateur BMX and motocross racer prepared him well for when he turned pro in 2009, and he signed for Troy Lee Designs Honda for the following season. In 2011, Seely tallied a pair of supercross victories, both in the 250 West class. He added another the following year, and 2013 saw him finish third in the series points standings. This past season is when the Californian came into his own, notching a pair of 250SX West wins and challenging for the class title up until the final round before eventually settling for second. Since 2011, Cole has also occasionally pitched in as a substitute 450 rider for the factory Honda team, and he scored a podium finish in the premier class at Indianapolis this year.

Date of Birth: March 10, 1990 (24 years old)
Birthplace: Westlake Village, CA
Residence: Laguna Beach, CA
Height: 5’10”
Weight: 155 lbs.
Racing Number: 21
Motorcycle: Honda CRF450R

American Honda Signs Cole Seely To Factory Team appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: American Honda Signs Cole Seely to Factory Team (Industry Press Releases)
American Honda Signs Cole Seely to Factory Team (Industry Press Releases) [message #5943] Mon, 25 August 2014 17:38
Anonymous
Torrance, Calif. (Aug. 25): American Honda Motor Corp., Inc. announced today that it has signed Cole Seely to its factory supercross/motocross team with a multiyear contract. As a member of the Troy Lee Designs Honda satellite squad, Seely this year finished a close second in the AMA Supercross series’ 250 West title chase and also […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Duke’s Den – The Perils Of Confidence
Duke’s Den – The Perils Of Confidence [message #5934] Mon, 25 August 2014 17:26
Anonymous

Confidence colors everything about our experiences on two wheels. At the early stages of our motorcycle careers, we’re mostly concerned with simple tasks like staying upright and not falling over. There are thousands of ways in which a moto ride could turn ugly, and we’re proud when we overcome hazards like gravel and traffic and rain. Your moto mind is sharp because your safety requires it.

As skills improve, so does our confidence, and rightly so. Maneuvers that once required our utmost concentration become second nature, and our focus moves on to other subjects, perhaps a pretty lady riding past, or maybe the pathetic state of your 401k. Or that dickhead in front of you tapping his brake pedal while he checks his email.

But, if you’re not completely focused on what’s going on behind the bars or are distracted by the stuff going on between your ears, you’re potentially compromising your safety.

The accumulation of skills results in increased rider confidence. But be wary of confidence turning into overconfidence.

The accumulation of skills results in increased rider confidence. But be wary of confidence turning into overconfidence.

Several years ago, I was riding on my way to a bike launch a few hours away from my home. I remember being anxious to get out there and try the new bike while I navigated surface streets on the way to a freeway. Traffic ahead was stopped, and I noticed the right lane was shorter, so I casually made a lane change to the shorter queue. What I didn’t notice quick enough was the driver ahead in the left lane also deciding the right lane looked preferable. She side-swiped me and the KTM 950 Adventure I was riding, causing us to hit the deck and prove, once again, that humans don’t bounce well.

Introspection is often a byproduct of intense pain, and so it was on that day as I grimaced to the curb and wondered if what happened was inevitable. The cops and the insurance company said later it wasn’t my fault, but, as I replayed the scenario over in my head, I knew I could’ve done more to reduce the likelihood of the collision.

Had I been more tuned in to my primary mission – navigating traffic safely – I may have noticed a sudden head turn that signalled immediate peril. But I’ll never know for sure, because I was instead not 100% focussed on my surroundings. After all, I had ridden down that same street  hundreds of times, and I had come out unscathed every time. Surely I must be quite competent at it, right?

When humans are proficient at something – anything – they don’t require maximum brain capacity to do it. I’ve played with musicians whose hands seem to fall almost mindlessly on the correct notes and chords while the brain controlling my hands of concrete is running on its rev limiter to simply follow along.

And so it is with trained and skilled motorcycle riders. Hundreds of small movements and actions are needed to just ride out of your garage and into traffic, and yet they are barely even considered by highly experienced riders. However, unlike our musician friends, a wrong note played while riding a motorcycle can be far more painful.

You might be the most skillful rider you know, but take my advice and don’t let your confidence go to your head.

Duke’s Den – The Perils Of Confidence appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Virgil Elings: The Eclectic Dialectic Collector
Virgil Elings: The Eclectic Dialectic Collector [message #5933] Mon, 25 August 2014 17:13
Anonymous

There are collectors and then there are collectors. And then there’s Virgil Elings, proprietor of the Solvang Vintage Motorcycle Museum. Is he eclectic or eccentric? Discriminating or indiscriminate? Crazy or crazy like a fox? Or all of the above?

Solvang Vintage Motorcycle Museum

Elings came early to motorcycling, and late to the collecting game. As a teenager, the first bike he rode was also the first one he bought. “My first bike was a ’39 James 125.” He hadn’t ridden anything before? “The other guys wouldn’t let me ride theirs.”

At age 16, after a frustrating experience with an Indian Brave, he traded it in on a BSA Golden Flash. “I had a paper route at the time, and made about $15 a week. So I made terms with the dealer to pay $10 a week on the BSA.” Dealer/customer relations were more relaxed in the Fifties.

Virgil is always glad to chat about the machines in his care, and occasionally sells a few when he runs out of space.

Virgil is always glad to chat about the machines in his care, and occasionally sells a few when he runs out of space.

A native of Des Moines, Iowa, Virgil attended a technical high school (where he built his own drill press) and went on to study mechanical engineering at the University of Iowa, followed by graduate work in physics at the prestigious MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). He completed his Ph.D. in 1966. The motorcycle habit continued, largely because “you couldn’t find a place to park a car in Boston.” For the next 20 years he taught physics at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), where the bikes included Triumph and BSA Twins, followed by a Honda Four, which gave way to a Jaguar roadster.

On sabbatical in 1986, Elings and former student Gus Gurley created Digital Instruments, pioneers in the field of scanning probe microscopes, at the forefront of nanotechnology. With the company’s success, UCSB determined that it represented a conflict of interest for a professor, and asked that he divest himself of the business. Elings gracefully declined, quit teaching and 10 years later, sold the company for many millions of dollars. Many many millions.

Jeff gets set to race in the Corsa Moto Classica at Willow Springs.

Jeff Elings gets set to race in the Corsa Moto Classica at Willow Springs while Virgil looks on.

With time and money on his hands, Virgil and sons Mike and Jeff got involved in vintage motocross. They all did well as Novices,  Jeff and Virgil both winning the west coast championship in their divisions. Jeff collected a National #1 plate in the Classic ’60s class. After a couple years they moved up to the Amateur class, “where we seemed to be a lot slower, so it wasn’t as much fun.” Instead, they decided to try roadracing.

Virgil takes the 1953 NSU Rennsport out for a few demonstration laps.

Virgil takes the 1953 NSU Rennsport out for a few demonstration laps.

Virgil has since retired from active competition, but still wrenches for Jeff in selected regional events of the American Historic Racing Motorcycle Association (AHRMA). Jeff ran three classes at the recent Willow Springs Moto Corsa Classica and collected three wins on Saturday and three more on Sunday. “Willow has been my favorite track,” Virgil said. “You get a long view and there’s not much braking involved.” He still takes some of the rare machines out for demonstration laps at the races.

The supercharged 1938 DKW 350 requires numerous plug checks. The fifth cylinder, on the bottom, acts as the pressure pump.

The supercharged 1938 DKW 350 requires numerous plug checks. The fifth cylinder, on the bottom, acts as the pressure pump.

Jaroslav Walter went to work for CZ in 1949. His father, Josef, began building motorcycles in Prague in 1902.

Jaroslav Walter went to work for CZ in 1949. His father, Josef, began building motorcycles in Prague in 1902.

While motorcycles represented fun and freedom in his student days, they now also serve Virgil as diverse examples of mechanical engineering and “a bank account I can enjoy.” A guided tour of the museum is a learning experience for even those with some background in moto-history, given the rarity of many of these machines. Elings obviously enjoys providing the commentary on such obscurities as the Mars, a customized Motosacoche and the Megola.

“This is a Walter,” he says, indicating a single-cylinder bike in the shop area behind the museum. “He (Jaroslav Walter) went on to design all the CZ overhead cam stuff, and I don’t think there are too many of these in the world. The Pebble Beach guys are gonna allow us to bring it up and stick it in the show. I think most of the CZ four-strokes were race bikes only.

“Over there is a BMW Rennsport, these were the overhead-cam engines, they made 25 in 1954, each with extra engine with no serial number. They raced them from ’54 to ’74, pretty much owning the world championship in sidecars for 20 years. If you blew up the crankcase you’d get a new one from BMW, if you traded yours in, with no serial numbers.”

A tourist asks about a single-cylinder Ariel sloper. “I think it’s 600,” Elings says. “I collect things that I typically don’t know about. So if I stumble on something like that and say what the hell? I tend to buy it. Also something I think you’ll never see again.”

While the winds at Willow usually preclude sun hats, Jeff's afro is sufficient to keep one in place.

While the winds at Willow usually preclude sun hats, Jeff’s afro is sufficient to keep one in place.

One notes the number of AJS racers in the collection. “I think we have six of them,” says Elings. “I like 7Rs. Some guys in England are still making them, so you can get parts. Same with the Norton Manx. Bikes that get raced you can gets parts for, bikes that don’t get raced have no parts. That’s the worry about Vincents, when people stopped racing them there was no market.”

Virgil points to a MV 500 Triple replica. “A guy in England also makes those. It dropped a valve at Willow and I thought it was just a spark plug and kept going around, ended up destroying the engine. Usually when that happens and you own the bike, you stop. It’s the guys who don’t own the bike that keep going. I loaned a Norton to a guy, really good racer, and he was doing well until it quit running. We pulled the spark plug out and it was smashed flat. He said let’s change the spark plug. I said I don’t think that’s going to help.”

From 1966 to 1972, Giacomo Agostini won seven consecutive world titles on the MV 500 three.

From 1966 to 1972, Giacomo Agostini won seven consecutive world titles on the MV 500 three.

Someone notices a Harley-Davidson VR 1000 in the corner, Milwaukee’s ill-fated attempt to go road racing. “I bought that to put beside the Britten,” Virgil says. “I was going to put a sign on it:(saying) Money Doesn’t Do Everything.”

Eastern European motorcycles were featured at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance this summer. In addition to the Walter, Elings displayed the DOHC CZ 125 with dustbin fairing and the 500cc Twin Jawa roadracer.

1960 Jawa DOHC 500cc Twin. The 350cc version came second and third in the 1961 world championship, behind the MV Four.

1960 Jawa DOHC 500cc Twin. The 350cc version came second and third in the 1961 world championship, behind the MV Four.

While Virgil is generous with his time at the museum, he doesn’t spend a lot of it there gloating over his acquisitions. He also has a large lavender farm near by, raises pigs and has “some big pets, Scottish Highland steers and a Zonky.” (Look it up) He also rides more contemporary motorcycles on the road.

Elings has also contributed generously to charities, education and medical research. He and Betty Elings Wells donated $12.5 million to UC Santa Barbara, for the California Institute for Science and Innovation building; $2 million to the Las Positas Friendship Park (now Elings Park) in Santa Barbara, and recently $3.5 million to the Center for Theoretical Physics at MIT.

Obviously Elings isn’t your average motorcyclist, or collector, and his absent-minded professor demeanor (complete with Einstein hair style) can be misleading. But you can tell his mind is always engaged, that some of his synaptic energies may be elsewhere. He reminds me of that Tom Waits song (“What’s he building in there?”). On the other hand, while he may seem to have more money than God, it’s also obvious that he puts a lot of it to good use. He doesn’t appear to waste any on fashion or frivolity – he’s been wearing the same leathers for 10 years.

Just another rider, basically. One with a really enjoyable bank account.

Virgil Elings will serve as Grand Marshal at the annual Central Coast Classic Motorcycle Show & Swap Meet in San Luis Obispo, Calif., Sat. Oct. 11, 2014. Special guest is Craig Vetter. Info at CentralCoastClassicMC.com.

Virgil Elings: The Eclectic Dialectic Collector appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: The Latest Motorcycle Helmet Brand: Nutcase
The Latest Motorcycle Helmet Brand: Nutcase [message #5932] Mon, 25 August 2014 16:33
Anonymous

The name might sound a bit, uh, nutty, but Nutcase Helmets, a recognized designer of lifestyle sports helmets, is gearing up for the spring with the global launch of MOTO, the brand’s first widely-available collection of scooter, moped and motorcycle helmet designs.

With a name like Nutcase, it’s no surprise the brand is known for its signature tongue-in-cheek graphics with performance that has made the brand a global hit with bike nuts, water sports fans, snowboarders and skaters.

Available in the spring of 2014, the MOTO line includes eight eye-catching designs – Stumptown Woody, Hypnotic, Americana, Modern Argyle, Union Jack, Retro Racer, Salt, and Pepper. Each helmet comes ready for daily use, featuring an ABS hard shell and Expanded Polystyrene protective inner foam for impact protection with two front intake vents. Removable ear pads, standard with every helmet, provide additional fit customization while smart features such as a quick-release, easy-use buckle and deluxe soft roll neck offer both practicality and comfort on the road. All MOTO helmets are DOT and ECE dual-certified, feature the iconic “I Love My Brain” and “Helmet Guy” logos and come with a Nutcase branded helmet cinch bag.

“Nutcase is moving into the fast lane in all senses,” says Michael Morrow, Nutcase founder and CEO. “We are no longer just a bike category brand. With our expansion in the snow, water and skate categories and now the addition of MOTO, we’re proud to say we’re helping people express their unique style and stay safe wherever they choose to get outside and have fun or go about their daily commute.”

Available in four sizes, Small (55-56cm), Medium (57-58cm), Large (59-60cm) & X-Large (61cm) owners of MOTO helmets will also be able to match whichever nutty design they choose with an anti-scratch shield available in two sizes and three colors. Each shield works on a simple pivot system and can be easily removed for cleaning or switching to a different color.

Go to www.nutcasehelmets.com for more information.

The Latest Motorcycle Helmet Brand: Nutcase appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Hero MotoCorps Hires Ex-BMW Designer Braunsperger
Hero MotoCorps Hires Ex-BMW Designer Braunsperger [message #5931] Mon, 25 August 2014 14:25
Anonymous

Hero MotoCorp has hired former BMW designer Markus Braunsperger to lead the Indian company’s research and development division. Braunsperger once held a similar position with BMW in the early 2000s, developing models such as the K1200S before moving on to BMW’s automobile division where he helped design the 5, 6 and 7 series sedans as well as the X3, X5 and X7 SUVs.

Braunsperger will head Hero’s new R&D center in Rajasthan, India, starting in October. Bringing Braunsperger into the fold is an important move for Hero, as its technology licensing deal with former partner Honda expired in June. Braunsperger will work with Hero’s current technology partners, fuel system company Magneti Marelli and Engines Engineering of Italy, Austria’s AVL and Erik Buell Racing (Hero MotoCorp also owns a 49.2% stake in EBR).

Hero’s first models developed without Honda are expected to hit the Indian market this fall, starting with the HXR250R sportbike (pictured above).

[Source: IBTimes]

Hero MotoCorps Hires Ex-BMW Designer Braunsperger appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Gear Review: Exustar Canyon boots
Gear Review: Exustar Canyon boots [message #5941] Mon, 25 August 2014 10:25
Anonymous

Alexandra puts in time with a set of street boots.

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 Topic: Toronto councillor backing loud pipe law motion
Toronto councillor backing loud pipe law motion [message #5940] Mon, 25 August 2014 09:36
Anonymous

Kristyn Wong-Tam wants to co-ordinate with province for battle against noisy bikes.

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 Topic: EagleRider adds new models from Indian
EagleRider adds new models from Indian [message #5939] Mon, 25 August 2014 09:01
Anonymous

Motorcycle rental outfit will offer Scout, Roadmaster.

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 Topic: The people behind the scenes: Kawasaki
The people behind the scenes: Kawasaki [message #5938] Mon, 25 August 2014 08:47
Anonymous

Team Green introduces the people essential to their World Superbike effort.

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 Topic: Missing Tennessee rider found
Missing Tennessee rider found [message #5937] Mon, 25 August 2014 08:38
Anonymous

Rider on cross-continental trip had been out of contact for days.

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 Topic: New gear from ICON for fall
New gear from ICON for fall [message #5936] Mon, 25 August 2014 07:33
Anonymous

Company promos product with video featuring a blast from the past.

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 Topic: Hottest events this week
Hottest events this week [message #5930] Sun, 24 August 2014 20:00
Anonymous

Wonderingggggg what large and interesting motorcycle related events are happening this week? Wonder no more, here’s the CMG list of the week’s hottest (and maybe some not so hot) motorcycle activities. Enjoy.

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 Topic: Church Of MO 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview
Church Of MO 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview [message #5929] Sun, 24 August 2014 10:09
Anonymous

Generally speaking, three-wheelers don’t get a favorable reception from you, our MO readers. That being said, check this out. After digging in the vaults just six years, we bring you our 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview from 2009. While many would call it blasphemy to convert a KTM 690 Supermoto into a trike, we think you’ll agree this is one cool three-wheeler. It leans into turns like the Piaggio MP3, but a flick of the wrist will also kick out the rear – something we’ve always wanted to do with a Can-Am Spyder. For this week’s Church of MO feature, check out what our European contributor, Tor Sagen, had to say about it from his 2008 preview.

2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview

Lean On Me

Although the Brudeli Leanster 654L is structurally based on the KTM 690 Supermoto, it resembles little else on this earth. It will be revealed next week at the Intermot show in Cologne, Germany, but the story of the Leanster goes back quite a ways.

DPP07D80602163433

A prototype known as the Brudeli 625L was first shown at EICMA in Milano back in November 2005 after a number of years in production. The inspiration for the 625L, which was based on a Polaris Trail Blazer ATV, came over ten years ago when inventor Geir Brudeli witnessed an old Swedish army motorbike that utilized skis up front in order to navigate the icy winter terrain.

Brudeli says the KTM-powered Leanster is at home on the local dirt track oval.

Brudeli says the KTM-powered Leanster is at home on the local dirt track oval.

The 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L is something quite out of the ordinary and has been created in a manner that accommodates leaning 45 degrees, which is five degrees more than Piaggio’s MP3 scooter. The Brudeli Leanster is no scooter though as it’s been made to lean, wheelie and stop just like a motorcycle – with the addition of one more front wheel!

Brudeli essentially pioneered this field as the Leanster was launched long before the Piaggio MP3 or Harley-Davidson Tri-Glide. The Leanster is powered by a 654cc four-stroke single cylinder powerplant supplied by KTM, as is much of the Leanster.

The high performing single produces 63 horsepower @ 7,000rpm and 48 ft-lbs of torque @ 6,550rpm. The dry weight is a claimed 525 lbs resulting in a claimed top speed of 104mph. Although it may not be the fastest bike around, it sure can be fun according to the inventor and manager of Brudeli Tech., Geir Brudeli.

“Making a 100 meter controlled powerslide at the local dirt track oval is quite an unbeatable feeling, especially when this is a street legal vehicle you actually rode to the track.” says Brudeli. “Then just a few minutes later you could be at a go-kart track without any change at the setup, leaning 45 degrees into corners with a control superior to a normal motorcycle.”

The Leanster suspension is 100% mechanical, leaving the rider in control of an experience unlike any other. The chassis is comprised of a tubular steel frame. Taking a closer look at those two front wheels that make this bike so special, you notice the massive 325mm brake discs with an inside out design and ISR calipers. The tires are 120/70/17 at the front and a 160/60/17 at the back.

DPP07D805170C0B48

The design of the new model has been executed by Atle Stubberud of ‘Soon Design’. Atle Stubberud was also the key designer for the concept model from 2005. Some designers would be intimidated to work on such a project, but Stubberud enjoyed the process a great deal.

“This really was a dream project for a transportation designer, it was similar to a student project where you could start with a really open mind,” says Stubberud.

Brudeli admits that he is looking for potential representation in the US as well as throughout Europe. He plans on having his company serve the market single-handedly but is considering possible dealership solutions. As opposed to the other more docile three-wheeled options, Brudeli is looking to target the true enthusiast – one who isn’t afraid to lean down 45 degrees and get their knees a little dirty.

Church Of MO – 2009 Brudeli Leanster 654L Preview appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: Roczen Crowned Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Champion in Utah (Industry Press Releases)
Roczen Crowned Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Champion in Utah (Industry Press Releases) [message #5942] Sat, 23 August 2014 17:39
Anonymous
Canard Earns First Career 450 Class Victory while Martin Dominates 250 Class TOOELE, Utah (August 23, 2014) – The 12th and final round of the 2014 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, signified the series’ second ever visit to Miller Motorsports Park, just outside of Salt Lake City, for the Zions […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Polaris Industries Delivers Ice Bucket Challenge to Dealers + Video
Polaris Industries Delivers Ice Bucket Challenge to Dealers + Video [message #5927] Sat, 23 August 2014 14:27
Anonymous

Polaris Industries, Inc.’s CEO and all around good sport, Scott Wine posted an Ice Bucket Challenge video this weekend, calling for all Polaris dealers to accept the challenge. After pointing out Polaris’ long history of support for the fight to end ALSthrough events like the Black Woods Blizzard Tour and pledging to donate $10,000 to ALS research if 100 dealers accept his challenge, Wine was doused with ice water.

“Polaris has a long history of giving back and is proud to support this effort,” said Wine. “We encourage our strong network of dealers to accept the nomination or donate to an ALS charity.”

To date, Polaris employees have raised more than $900,000 for ALS and have set $1,000,000 total as their goal for 2015. To donate to ALS research, go to the ALS Association web site.

Polaris Industries Delivers Ice Bucket Challenge to Dealers + Video appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Sturgis Motorcycle Ralley, Inc. Wins Trademark Infringement Suit
Sturgis Motorcycle Ralley, Inc. Wins Trademark Infringement Suit [message #5926] Sat, 23 August 2014 14:13
Anonymous

Those who can remember way back to 2001 may recall a kerfuffle over the rights to the name Sturgis being held amongst some of the rally’s players in Sturgis, SD. According to Trademark’em, “[t]he trademark dispute concerning the “brand” Sturgis goes back to January 30, 2001 when the Sturgis Area Chamber of Commerce filed a trademark application for STURGIS (‘Sturgis Mark’).” This legal wrangling continued until it was at least partially resolved with the creation of Sturgis Motorcycle Ralley, Inc. (SMRi), which assumed the Sturgis Mark assets in 2011. Since this time, SMRi has actively pursued any perceived infringements of the Sturgis brand.

Most recently, SMRi defended the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally trademark against Georgia company Renegade Classics and its retail store over its use of “Sturgis Rally Week” on products. SMRi successfully argued that Renegade Classics misuse would “confuse customers about the source of the products and deprive the City and the citizens of Sturgis of royalties due from officially licensed merchandise.”

“SMRi was established to spur economic development in the Black Hills region and to bring money back to the community through charitable contributions derived from sales of official licensed merchandise. When Renegade Classics and its agents use the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally trademarks without having a license, less money will go back to the community and we can’t stand for that,” said SMRi Board Member and City of Sturgis Councilman David Hersrud.

Although SMRi won this suit, the organization still has others working their way through the legal system. Actions againstRushmore Photo and Gift and Wal-Mart Stores for the use of “Officially Licensed Sturgis” and “Sturgis Motor Classic” on products are currently moving through the South Dakota federal courts.

Sturgis Motorcycle Ralley, Inc. Wins Trademark Infringement Suit appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: Weekend Awesome – Sticking the Landing
Weekend Awesome – Sticking the Landing [message #5925] Sat, 23 August 2014 09:25
Anonymous

This edition of the Weekend Awesome comes to us from Russia, the land of the dashboard camera. This week’s video features a rider making an ill-timed attempt at a high-speed pass in a small gap, finding himself crashing into the back of a car whose driver decides to change lanes at the exact same time. High speeds and poor decision-making often lead to tragedy, but not in this case.

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

At the speed he was going, the rider’s momentum sent him somersaulting in the air and landing on his feet on the roof of the car he rear-ended. We can’t tell if he was riding a Kawasaki, but the rider is definitely a ninja.

Weekend Awesome – Sticking the Landing appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: 2015 EBR 1190SX First Ride Review
2015 EBR 1190SX First Ride Review [message #5919] Fri, 22 August 2014 17:41
Anonymous

2015 EBR 1190SX

Editor Score: 85.25%
Engine 18.5/20
Suspension/Handling 14.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 8.0/10
Brakes 8.0/10
Instruments/Controls3.75/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.5/10
Appearance/Quality 8.5/10
Desirability 9.0/10
Value 7.0/10
Overall Score85.25/100

The heavyweight Streetfighter category of motorcycles has exploded in popularity lately, with seemingly every manufacturer jumping on the bandwagon for a piece of the pie. Japan’s represented with the Kawasaki Z1000, Honda CB1000R, and even Suzuki is entering the ring in 2015 with the GSX-S1000. Italy’s three representatives include the MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR, Ducati Monster 1200 and Aprilia Tuono V4R. Germany, of course, gives us the BMW S1000R, and we can’t forget BMW’s Austrian neighbors and their contribution to the party: the all-conquering KTM 1290 Super Duke R, Motorcycle.com’s 2014 Motorcycle of the Year.

With so many players in the game, it’s hard to stand out from the crowd. So what’s a small company like EBR to do? If you’re Erik Buell, you carve a different path, create a new category and become a party of one. Introducing the EBR 1190SX, the all-American Superfighter.

Unlike the P-51 Mustang in the background, the EBR 1190SX is a fighter of a different kind.

Unlike the P-51 Mustang in the background, the EBR 1190SX is a fighter of a different kind.

If the SX looks like the 1190RX sans clip-ons and front bodywork, you’re right. During the incredibly short press briefing, the folks in EBR shirts made note to mention the team took a “no compromises” approach to building a superbike for the street. What this means to you and me is EBR simply made the SX a naked version of the RX. Sharing many of the same components as the RX, like the fuel-in-frame chassis, 72-degree, 1190cc, liquid-cooled V-Twin with swirled intake air, and perimeter-style front brake, it’s actually easier to talk about what’s different between the two models: upright handlebars instead of clip-ons, minimal bodywork instead of full fairings, a slightly different underbelly exhaust cover, and a softer shock spring. That’s it. The rest of the SX shares the same part numbers as the RX. Even the EFI tuning is identical to the RX, meaning, unlike other streetfighters, this engine hasn’t been re-tuned or detuned to benefit torque production at the expense of top-end power. Not that the RX’s mill is lacking in this department, anyway.

Superfighter or streetfighter? Tomato or to-mah-toe? Whatever category you want to place the 1190SX in, the EBR matches nicely against three competitors: the Aprilia Tuono V4R, BMW S1000R and KTM 1290 Super Duke R, which just so happened to comprise our 2014 Ultimate Streetfighter Finale. Looking strictly at the numbers in the spec chart below, the EBR appears to be a formidable challenge to its three European competitors. At 1190cc, its engine is significantly larger than both the Aprilia and BMW, while its approximately 160 rear-wheel horsepower and 13.4:1 compression ratio is tops in this field. The KTM’s monstrous 96.5 ft-lbs is still king of the class, 10 up on the EBR, which itself then towers over the Italian and German.

2014 Ultimate Streetfighter Shootout Specs
Aprilia Tuono
V4R APRC ABS
BMW S1000R KTM 1290
Super Duke R
EBR 1190SX
MSRP $14,499 $14,950 $16,999 $16,995
Engine Capacity 999cc 999cc 1301cc 1190cc
Engine Type 65° V-Four Inline-Four 75º V-Twin 72º V-Twin
Bore x Stroke 78 x 52.3 mm 80 x 49.7mm 108 x 71mm 106 x 67.5mm
Compression 13:1 12.0:1 13.2:1 13.4:1
Horsepower/Torque 148 hp @ 11,600 rpm / 73.4 ft-lb. @ 9500 rpm 155.3 hp @ 11,200 rpm / 79.7 ft-lb. @ 9,500 rpm 156.0 hp @ 9,100 rpm / 96.5 ft-lb. @ 8,200 rpm 160 hp @ 10,600 rpm / 88 ft-lbs. @ 8200 rpm (approx.)
Fuel System Electronic fuel injection Electronic fuel injection Electronic fuel injection Electronic fuel injection
Transmission Six-Speed Six-Speed Six-Speed Six-Speed
Final Drive Chain Chain Chain Chain
Frame Aluminum dual beam chassis with pressed and cast sheet elements Aluminum composite bridge frame Tubular space frame made from chrome molybdenum steel, powder-coated Aluminum frame with integral fuel reservoir
Front Suspension Sachs 43mm inverted fork with one-by-one separated damping adjustments Sachs 46mm inverted fork with Dynamic Damping Control semi-active suspension WP Suspension 48mm inverted fork with adjustable compression and rebound damping Showa inverted Big Piston Fork
Rear Suspension Sachs piggyback monoshock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping Dynamic damping control semi-active suspension WP Suspension monoshock, fully adjustable Showa monoshock
Front Brakes Dual 320mm floating discs, Brembo M432 4-piston monoblock radial calipers and ABS Dual 320mm floating rotors, Brembo fixed radial-mount 4-piston calipers and ABS Dual 320mm rotors with Brembo M50 4-piston monoblock calipers and ABS Single 386mm perimeter rotor, 8-piston inside-out caliper
Rear Brakes 220mm disc. Brembo 2-piston floating caliper Single 220mm rear rotor, single piston floating caliper Single 240mm rear rotor with two-piston caliper Single 220mm disc, two-piston Hayes Performance caliper
Front Tire 120/70 ZR17 120/70 ZR17 120/70 ZR17 120/70 ZR17
Rear Tire 190/55 ZR17 190/55 ZR17 190/55 ZR17 190/55 ZR17
Seat Height 32.9 in 32.0 in 32.9 in 32.5 in
Wheelbase 56.8 in 56.7 in 58.3 in 55.5 in
Rake/Trail 25.0°/ 4.2 in 24.6º/3.9 in 24.9º/4.21 in 22.4º/3.8 in
Curb Weight 474 lbs 450 lbs 469 lbs 441 lbs. (est.)
Fuel Capacity 4.9 gal 4.6 gal 4.7 gal 4.5 gal

From there, all four bikes are similarly matched. Seat height is 32.5 inches, directly between the 32.0-inch BMW seat and 32.9 inches for both the Aprilia and KTM. At 55.5 inches, the EBR’s wheelbase is more than an inch shorter than the BMW, the next shortest one of the four at 56.7 inches. The SX also has the most aggressive rake and trail numbers at 22.4 degrees/3.8 inches, respectively. The BMW S1000R, at 24.6 degrees/3.9 inches, almost seems lazy by comparison. Interestingly, EBR lists the 1190SX’s wet weight, minus fuel, at 414 lbs. Factoring in its 4.5-gallon fuel load at 6 lbs per gallon, the SX should come in at approximately 441 lbs. If accurate, then the EBR will come in 9 lbs lighter than the BMW, the lightest bike from our shootout, and a whopping 33 lbs slimmer than the Aprilia!

The 1190cc 72-degree V-Twin is a torque lover’s dream. However, the cooling fans on either side will blow heat right towards your knees. Nice on cool rides, not so pleasant otherwise.

The 1190cc 72-degree V-Twin is a torque lover’s dream. However, the cooling fans on either side will blow heat right towards your knees. Nice on cool rides, not so pleasant otherwise.

Numbers Don’t Tell The Whole Story

Being nearly identical to the 1190RX I tested at Indianapolis Motor Speedway only a few weeks prior, what stood out to me about the EBR in a track setting was a seemingly endless amount of torque along with an incredibly agile chassis. Without any street time aboard the RX, however, the SX press ride would provide a glimpse into normal life with both bikes.

Unfortunately, Mother Nature doesn’t seem to cooperate with EBR press launches. First she rained down during the 1190RX launch at the Brickyard, then she did the same on our SX ride day in East Troy, Wisconsin, EBR’s own backyard. The rain was spitting at first, followed by a downpour later in the afternoon.

Rain meant any real testing of the 1190SX’s limits would have to wait for another time. However, the upright seating position compared to the RX is a welcome feature during any street ride.

Rain meant any real testing of the 1190SX’s limits would have to wait for another time. However, the upright seating position compared to the RX is a welcome feature during any street ride.

Nonetheless, a few things stand out about the 1190SX. First, the simple change from clip-ons to handlebars noticeably alters the riding position. It sounds obvious, but the more upright stance is easier on the back and wrists, which is especially appreciated on highway jaunts (either that or I’m just getting old). If it were mine, I’d opt for bars that are slightly higher still, while moving the pegs down to their lowest (of two) positions. This puts the feet about half an inch lower and a quarter-inch forward.

Just as I experienced at Indy, the 1190cc V-Twin is the center of attention. Twisting the throttle is met with an utterly addictive surge of torque that, from the seat-of-the-pants dyno, feels more outrageous to me than even the Super Duke R. And yes, I’m aware how audacious that sounds. No matter the gear and no matter the speed, if the gigantic torque curve the EBR delivers doesn’t put a smile on your face, there’s something wrong with you.

Aggressive rake and trail numbers combined with a short wheelbase gives the SX superb agility. Standard Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa tires work well, even in the wet.

Aggressive rake and trail numbers combined with a short wheelbase gives the SX superb agility. Standard Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa tires work well, even in the wet.

A tall first gear slightly tames that power when leaving a stoplight, but, assuming the traction control isn’t set too high, hoisting a wheelie accidentally will be a fate many experience – not that there’s anything wrong with that. Shifts are done without the help of a quickshifter, though one will be available through EBR parts and accessories in the future and will fit both the SX and RX. Personally, as I was never able to shift cleanly from first to second without using the clutch, opting for the quickshifter option is a no-brainer. That said, shifts through the rest of the gears are smooth. Considering the $16,999 KTM Super Duke R, which is only $4 more than the EBR, is also sans quickshifter (something the $14,950 BMW and $14,499 Aprilia are both equipped with), the lack of one on both the KTM and EBR just doesn’t make sense.

Equally pleasing as the torque are the wonderful sounds the bike makes. It barks loudly at every twist of the wrist, with a mean, two-pronged guttural attack on the senses coming from both the exhaust as well as the huge 61mm throttle bodies as they suck all available air in the vicinity. Although it’s already intoxicating in stock form, an aftermarket pipe will surely make it come alive. As an added bonus, hearing the chain idler whine as it keeps proper tension on decel sounds similar to a supercharger whine, giving the EBRs a distinctive noise unlike anything else out there.

It wouldn’t be an EBR without a massive perimeter rotor. While it no-doubt looks cool and performs well, they aren’t quite at the level of a high-end Brembo setup.

It wouldn’t be an EBR without a massive perimeter rotor. While it no-doubt looks cool and performs well, they aren’t quite at the level of a high-end Brembo setup.

However, good things come at a cost, and once revs exceed the 5000-rpm mark, noticeable vibration is felt through the bars. It’s an annoying buzz that puts hands to sleep quickly if the engine speed is sustained, but fortunately, highway speeds are easily met in higher gears at lower revs. Also, while the radiator fans are placed in a prime location to accept fresh air and expel heat, their positioning blows that hot air directly on your kneecaps.

As you might expect, twisty roads are hard to come by in Wisconsin, and the wet conditions meant exploring the limits on the few corners we did find was out of the question. Nonetheless, the standard Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa tires provided impressive grip levels considering the conditions. As with the RX, transitions are made quickly, but the shallow steering sweep makes slow-speed maneuvers, like U-turns for photo passes, a little tricky.

Cue the Tom Cruise scene from Top Gun.

Cue the Tom Cruise scene from Top Gun.

The mixture of rain, street tires and a fat torque curve is a recipe for highsides, but the traction control system employed by EBR, which relies strictly on wheel-speed sensors, provides a safety net for those who get overzealous with the throttle. With 20 different settings (plus off), the lower numbers allow quite a bit of slip before intruding, while the higher numbers virtually eliminate slip entirely. The multi-level settings allow a suitable one for almost any rider.

EBR’s signature 386mm single perimeter brake rotor and 8-piston caliper is fed with a steel-braided line, and though braking performance is strong, I’d stop short of rating it above the Brembo units on all three of the European streetfighters mentioned earlier. With all due respect to Erik Buell’s outside-the-box approach to stopping a motorcycle, the perimeter brake doesn’t quite match up to the M50 calipers on the KTM (and Ducati 1199 Panigale), which provide unmatched levels of power and feel.

EBR On The Move

Considering the infancy of EBR and the limited resources at its disposal, the 1190SX is an impressive machine. With his unique approach to chassis design and braking methods, Erik Buell is setting the 1190SX apart from the rest, which, in the street/superfighter category is an important element for consumers. Then again, so is price. At $16,995, it’s one of the more expensive players in the category and yet it lacks much of the technology of its less expensive rivals, including ride-by-wire throttle actuation, ride modes, cruise control, wheelie control, dynamic suspension, quickshifter and ABS.

On paper, the EBR 1190SX poses a formidable challenge to the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. We can’t wait to get the two together for a head-to-head faceoff.

On paper, the EBR 1190SX poses a formidable challenge to the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. We can’t wait to get the two together for a head-to-head faceoff.

However, what the EBR lacks in technology, it makes up for by appealing to the senses – the intangible X-factor. Erik Buell is relying on the torque, agility, sounds, and performance of his bikes to put a smile on your face. A smile big enough to head to one of 82 dealers (and growing) in this country, fork over 17-large and bring one home.

+ Highs

  • Torque!
  • Good looks in a field of attractive streetfighters
  • Relatively comfy ergos for street riding
- Sighs

  • Excess heat gets blown to kneecaps
  • The cost vs. technology ratio may not add up for some
  • Bars are buzzy above 5000 rpm

2015 EBR 1190SX First Ride Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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 Topic: NHTSA Launches Recall Look-up by VIN Tool
NHTSA Launches Recall Look-up by VIN Tool [message #5918] Fri, 22 August 2014 15:17
Anonymous

The U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have launched a new free online tool that should make it easier for consumers to inspect their vehicles’ safety recall histories. The new search tool, available at http://www.safercar.gov/vinlookup, allows people to look for recall campaigns by entering Vehicle Identification Numbers.

Consumers can enter their VIN information into the look-up tool and it will provide three different responses. “Recall Incomplete” means that an recall campaign is incomplete or “open”, and the tool will provide necessary instructions. “Recall Incomplete. Remedy Not Yet Available” means an open recall exists but the manufacturer does not have a fix in place yet. If there are no open recalls, the tool responds with “Number of Open Recalls: 0″.

“Safety is our highest priority, and an informed consumer is one of our strongest allies in ensuring recalled vehicles are repaired,” says Anthony Foxx, U.S. Transportation Secretary. “Starting today car owners, shoppers, and renters can find out if a specific vehicle has a safety defect that needs to be fixed – using our free online tool.”

NHTSA’s search tool relies on data provided by major light vehicle and motorcycle manufacturers. As of Aug. 20, all major  manufacturers are required to provide customers with search tools on their own websites for uncompleted recalls on their vehicles, with their databases updated at least once a week.

“Just as every single automaker should never hesitate to recall a defective vehicle, consumers should never hesitate to get their recalled vehicle fixed,” said NHTSA Deputy Administrator David Friedman. “By making individual VIN searches readily available, we’re providing another service to consumers – the peace of mind knowing that the vehicle they own, or that they are thinking of buying or renting, is free of safety defects.”

The tool provides information on incomplete recalls over the past 15 calendar years on major manufacturers. Small-volume manufacturers, especially custom builders are thus not included. The search tool also does not cover completed safety recalls, non-safety related recall campaigns and recalls that are more than 15 years old.

As of Aug. 22, NHTSA’s list of participating manufacturers includes BMW, BRP (Can-Am), Harley-Davidson, Honda, Suzuki and Triumph. Ducati, Kawasaki, KTM and Victory are not listed but all have a VIN look-up tool on their respective websites and will likely be added to NHTSA’s list shortly. As of this writing, Indian, MV Agusta and Yamaha do not yet have VIN look-up tools available on their websites.

[Source: NHTSA]

NHTSA Launches Recall Look-up by VIN Tool appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: 2014 Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS: MD Long-Term Ride Review (Bike Reports) (News)
2014 Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS: MD Long-Term Ride Review (Bike Reports) (News) [message #5923] Fri, 22 August 2014 13:42
Anonymous
You can call it ‘common wisdom,’ ‘group think,’ ‘Zeitgeist’ or maybe even ‘mob mentality,’ but as a product ages, the general narrative about it solidifies into a widely held belief. When it comes to V-Stroms, the narrative went, the 1000 is a pretty good bike, but the 650 is so much lighter and fun to […]... Click Here for Article
 Topic: Wharf Rat to charge $10 for entry
Wharf Rat to charge $10 for entry [message #5922] Fri, 22 August 2014 09:03
Anonymous

Registration is no longer optional this year.

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 Topic: Triumph Triumphant
Triumph Triumphant [message #5921] Fri, 22 August 2014 08:45
Anonymous

Pit Pass Radio talks to Kenny Riedmann after his Pro Sport Bike win.

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 Topic: Friday Fudge
Friday Fudge [message #5920] Fri, 22 August 2014 06:03
Anonymous

This week in Friday Fudge: Flying the chair.

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 Topic: Yamaha Patents Tricity Variant Design
Yamaha Patents Tricity Variant Design [message #5908] Thu, 21 August 2014 18:24
Anonymous

Yamaha has patented the design for a new variant to its Tricity leaning three-wheeled scooter featuring a broader fairing resembling the TMax. Yamaha has previously announced it would introduce more leaning multi-wheeled vehicles, and this newly patented design may be the next one to go into production.

The new design is heavily-based on the original Tricity. In fact, the renderings filed in the patent appeared to be digitally-altered versions of the Tricity’s patent diagrams. From the animated GIF below, we can see that most of the parts align perfectly with the Tricity’s design.

The new patents reveal a wider face with twin headlights like Yamaha’s Tmax instead of the Tricity’s V-shaped single headlight. The bodywork includes a piece that extends down between the two front wheels, perhaps to offer better protection for the parallelogram link mechanism that allows the three-wheeler to lean.

082114-second-yamaha-tricity-lmw-animated

Now, it’s possible the second design may have been an alternate look Yamaha considered for the TMax and not an all-new model. The new design patent however, was filed on July 4 whereas the Tricity’s patent was filed months earlier on Feb. 7. The five-month difference between patent filings suggest that the second design is indeed for a new model.

Beside the front face, the only other visible change between the two models is the area between the foot placements. The new design has plastic bodywork positioned between the feet, possibly to cover a larger fuel tank.

We hope to learn more about this new three-wheeler in the months to come as we enter the autumn motorcycle show season.

[Source: Japan Patent Office]

Yamaha Patents Tricity Variant Design appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

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 Topic: You Are Still Invisible (News)
You Are Still Invisible (News) [message #5914] Thu, 21 August 2014 17:39
Anonymous
Every 3.5 years (we are a little late), we re-publish the “Being Invisible” article first published by MD on Janaury 28, 2007. Feel free to comment if you have other suggestions, or simply disagree with our thoughts on how to stay safe. Note that the article was not meant to address gear (helmet, jacket, boots, etc.) […]... Click Here for Article
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Current Time: Wed Aug 27 04:50:07 EDT 2014